Julia Evangelou Strait | St. Louis Public Radio

Julia Evangelou Strait

Julia Evangelou Strait
Peter Raven
St. Louis Public Radio file photo

Once every three months, Peter Raven pays a visit to his dermatologist. Summers spent at 10,000 feet, hiking northern California's Sierra Nevada Mountains and roaming the sand dunes and vacant lots of San Francisco take their toll. "That did a real number on my skin. Of course, nobody thought a thing about the sun in the 1950s," Raven said, describing a boyhood spent outdoors, rearing butterflies, collecting insects and gathering plants.  

Richard Sayre
Courtesy of the Danforth Plant Science Center

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: September 12, 2008 - Richard Sayre always wanted to be a scientist.

"I was a nerdy little kid," he says laughing and recalling an early foray into renewable energy production. In high school, he and his father built a device they hoped would generate an electrical current when heated, almost like a solar-powered battery. For the first test run, they put it in an oven, rigged up a way to measure current, and flipped the switch.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: An international team of scientists has sequenced the genome of a duck-billed platypus. Part bird, part reptile and part mammal, the platypus genome sheds light on the evolution of mammals, including humans, and on the genetics of disease. Led by Richard K. Wilson, director of the Genome Sequencing Center at Washington University School of Medicine, the scientific team found that this mammal's DNA is as unusual as its duck-bill.

An international team of scientists has sequenced the genome of a duck-billed platypus. Part bird, part reptile and part mammal, the platypus genome sheds light on the evolution of mammals, including humans, and on the genetics of disease. Led by Richard K. Wilson, director of the Genome Sequencing Center at Washington University School of Medicine, the scientific team found that this mammal's DNA is as unusual as its duck-bill.

Mixed-up Mammal

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Twenty million Americans celebrated the first Earth Day on April 22, 1970. That massive outpouring of activism forced politicians to pay attention to the environment and resulted in the founding of the Environmental Protection Agency and the passing or strengthening of laws regulating clean air, clean water and endangered species. In just a few years, this grassroots, democratic action made the United States a world leader in environmental protection.