Kae M. Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Kae M. Petrin

Digital Reporter

Kae M. Petrin joined St. Louis Public Radio as a Digital Reporter in 2017; they write multimedia and web-based stories, with a sprinkle of radio. Previously, they worked for St. Louis Magazine and freelanced around Missouri and Illinois. Kae has reported on real life cyborgs, shady landlords, premiere tattoo artists, and the complications of everyday life. In their free time, they bake, play roller derby, game, and ride motorcycles.

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A drone photo from September 11, 2018, shows the site of the new headquarters of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency.
Zach Dalin Photography

The city of St. Louis has cleared another hurdle in its effort to secure the land needed for the new headquarters of a federal spy agency.

St. Louis Circuit Judge Michael Stelzer on Tuesday condemned the 97-acre site in north St. Louis, where the new National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s western headquarters will be built. The decision makes it more difficult for others to claim they have any legal rights to the property.

St. Louis civic leaders, members of the Taylor family, which owns Enterprise Holdings, and World Wide Technology Jim Kavanaugh announced plans to form a bid to attract a Major League Soccer expansion team in St. Louis. Oct. 9, 2018.
Melody Walker | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at Oct. 9 at 4:50 p.m with comments from Major League Soccer —St. Louis is launching a new bid to attract a Major League Soccer team.

Members of the Taylor family, which owns Enterprise Holdings, are joining World Wide Technology CEO Jim Kavanaugh to form the bid for an MLS expansion team.

Bird electric scooters.  July 2018
Provided | Bird

It’s harder to find a bike-share bicycle in St. Louis now than it was in April. 

The citywide decrease happened largely because bike-share company ofo, which launched in St. Louis in April, pulled its services from the city in July. The China-based company left many local markets, including St. Louis, to consolidate its operations.

A delay in repair part shipments also forced Lime to pull some of its bikes from the street in the last two months, City of St. Louis officials said.

The West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton, seen from St. Charles Rock Road.
File Photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

On Thursday, the Environmental Protection Agency approved plans to clean up radioactive waste at the West Lake Landfill Superfund site.

The agency plans to remove about 70 percent of the site’s radioactivity and dispose of the waste at an off-site facility. The entire process is estimated to cost $205 million and take about four and a half years to complete.

Harris-Stowe State University

Harris-Stowe State University’s historic Vashon Community Center is getting an upgrade.

The university has received a $500,000 grant from the National Park Service to renovate the interior of the 1936 building, along with $1.2 million from the state of Missouri. The building has most recently been used for storage, but after the $1.7-million renovations, the former public recreation center will again be open to the public.

Maplewood on June 7, 2017
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The City of Maplewood may soon overhaul a controversial public-nuisance law that has been challenged by two recent lawsuits.

Maplewood’s City Council introduced an ordinance Tuesday that would add protections keeping victims of crimes from eviction and exclude calls to police from counting as a nuisance against residents.

This composite photo taken on April 10, 2018, shows the planned new site of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. McKee owned nearly 60 percent of the land in the 97-acre site.
File Photo | Brent Jones | St. Louis Public Radio

A St. Louis circuit judge Monday afternoon denied a motion to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the City of St. Louis aimed at showing it has clear title to land slated for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s new $1.75 billion facility.

The city filed the suit against the Bank of Washington on July 27, seeking “quiet title,” which requests the judge to make a judgment that declares one party the clear holder of a property’s title.

This composite photo taken on April 10, 2018, shows the planned new site of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. McKee owned nearly 60 percent of the land in the 97-acre site.
File Photo | Brent Jones | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 5 p.m. with comments from St. Louis Development Corporation Executive Director Otis Williams.

The city of St. Louis is working to show it controls the 97 acres slated for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s new headquarters — a $1.75 billion development project.

Alderman Brandon Bosley is sponsoring a bill that would allow the city to use eminent domain on land it already owns. Bosley’s 3rd ward comprises just under half of the NGA project footprint, as well as some of its surrounding neighborhoods in north St. Louis.

Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Paul McKee amassed more than 250 acres in north St. Louis as part of his $8 billion redevelopment plan.

In June the City of St. Louis announced that McKee's Northside Regeneration had defaulted on its agreement with the city after nearly a decade. McKee vehemently denies that.

St. Louis Public Radio examined two specific accountability measures included in those agreements that were ostensibly meant to track maintenance and complaints for McKee’s properties. What the reporting found was that only portions of the requirements were met, and the city did little to ensure that the developer followed through completely.

James Clark, vice president of community outreach at Better Family Life, addresses a crowd of people who have just received amnesty vouchers. He recommends keeping the vouchers on them at all times until the warrant is dismissed. August 15, 2018.
Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

People with misdemeanor warrants in St. Louis-area municipalities have a chance to get them dismissed Wednesday and Saturday this week.

Better Family Life’s warrant-amnesty program lets people pay a $10 processing fee to receive a $100 voucher that helps dismiss warrants for nonviolent offenses such as traffic violations or child-support delinquency, and other misdemeanor crimes.

David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Missourians turned out to the polls Tuesday to reject the right-to-work measure, while St. Louis County voters ousted longtime St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch in favor of Wesley Bell and voted by a narrow margin to retain incumbant Steve Stenger for County Council executive.

St. Louis Public Radio has collected results for many of the key races in the St. Louis region. 

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A train of spectators broke a ribbon at Cortex MetroLink Station on Tuesday morning. July 31, 2018.
Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

A new MetroLink stop opened on Tuesday in St. Louis’ Cortex tech district.

The Cortex MetroLink Station is the first new station built in more than 10 years. It’s also the first Metro Transit construction project built with both private and public funding.

The River Fitness team paddled 340 miles in 33 hours and one minute, smashing the MR340 course record by more than an hour on Wednesday. July 26, 2017.
Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

A team of three Missourians and two Texans this week paddled nearly 33 straight hours to shatter a course record in an annual canoe-and-kayak race across the state.

It’s only the second time in 13 years that Missourians have finished first overall in the Missouri River 340. The endurance race began in Kansas City Tuesday morning. The course stretches 340 miles along the Missouri River to its finish in St. Charles.

The 128-year-old Merchants Bridge is receiving a $172-million renovation. July 11, 2018.
Brent Jones | St. Louis Public Radio

Private railroad companies will rebuild a 128-year-old railroad bridge that spans the Mississippi River north of downtown St. Louis despite failing to secure federal funding that would help pay for the project.

Metro Transit

A new MetroLink station will open in St. Louis’ Cortex Innovation Community later this month.

The light-rail stop is located on the east side of Boyle Avenue between the existing Central West End and Grand stations. It’s part of a $15.4-million project to update transportation options surrounding the St. Louis tech hub. The station marks Metro Transit’s first construction project built with both private and public funding.

Metro Transit spokesperson Patti Beck said the stop will support Cortex’s growth as a tech hub.

June 27 2018 HUDZ meeting.
Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

A St. Louis aldermanic committee approved a resolution Wednesday that calls for federal and state authorities to investigate developer Paul McKee.

Suk (right) and Chandra Sapkota prepare gardens beds for planting at Global Farms' south St. Louis location on a Saturday in May 11, 2018.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The first time Jean de Dieu Sebunyenzi saw American food, he didn’t want to eat it. It was airplane food — hardly America’s finest culinary introduction.

Sebunyenzi had never been on a flight before, much less a 20-plus-hour travel marathon from Rwanda to Amsterdam to New York to his new home in St. Louis. The whole time, he ate nothing. It all looked so foreign to him.

Developer Paul McKee owns much of the land in this picture, looking north from the intersection of Cass and Jefferson avenues. After nearly 10 years, the city of St. Louis wants to cut ties with McKee and his NorthSide Regeneration initiative.
File Photo | Brent Jones | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 10 p.m. Tuesday with comments from NorthSide Regeneration — After nearly 10 years, the city of St. Louis wants to cut ties with developer Paul McKee and his NorthSide Regeneration initiative.

A 3D rendering of the "Romeo and Juliet" stage.
Margery and Peter Spack

Neon lights and the colors of young love will brighten Forest Park over the next three weeks, when Shakespeare Festival St. Louis presents the bard's "Romeo and Juliet" for the first time since 2001.

The play runs June 1 through June 24 at 8 p.m. every night except Tuesdays. A prelude performance starts at 6:30 p.m. before each show. All performances are held on this year's outdoor stage in the Shakespeare Glen, near the St. Louis Art Museum.

The set this year mixes modern pop sensibilities with architectural features inspired by Verona, Italy, where the love story and tragedy play out. 

LimeBike
Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Low-income St. Louisans now have a cheaper way to rent a ride from LimeBike.

At the beginning of April, LimeBike and another bikeshare company, Ofo, introduced their colorful bicycles to St. Louis. Normally, it costs $1 for 30 minutes to ride a LimeBike or $1 an hour to ride an Ofo bike.

Both companies have said they value social equality. To make their bikes more accessible for low-income riders, LimeBike and Ofo offer options — like text-to-unlock services — that don’t require smartphones or credit cards.

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