Kate Essig

News Intern
(Flickr/Stockmonkeys.com)

On Oct. 1, 1964, hundreds of University of California-Berkeley students surrounded a police car to protest the arrest of a student. Students stood on top of the car to deliver speeches and sing, “We Shall Overcome,” to a crowd that grew to include roughly two thousand students.

(Kate Essig/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis turns 250 in 2014, and to celebrate, stl250 has planned an entire year of birthday celebrations. On Monday, the volunteer led non-profit announced the final plans for its signature events. 

The birthday celebration begins on New Years Eve at Grand Center's First Night, where attendees can celebrate by making birthday hats, recording birthday wishes and decorating cupcakes.

(via Flickr/SenatorMcCaskill)

Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill’s amendment to the Defense Authorization Act that was designed to protect victims of sexual assault is facing competition from a fellow democrat.

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand of New York is author of an amendment that takes sexual assault cases out of the military chain of command and into the hands of military lawyers. 

McCaskill said Gillibrand’s amendment would give military prosecutors too much influence over sexual assault cases, which could be bad for victims. 

(WikepediaCommons)

Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill said today that President Obama should’ve apologized to the millions of Americans whose health insurance was canceled because it failed to meet Affordable Care Act requirements.

“These problems are inexcusable, and it’s embarrassing,” McCaskill said. 

McCaskill’s comments follow remarks made yesterday by former President Bill Clinton, who said President Obama should find a way to let people keep their health coverage, even if it means changing the new insurance law. 

comedy_nose / Flickr

While two Catholic grade schools will close in south St. Louis next fall, seven other parishes confirmed today that their schools will remain open.

All nine schools are members of the South City Collaboration, a coalition of parishes working together on challenges in their schools like declining enrollment, financial difficulties and the shifting population of south St. Louis. 

(via Flickr/Cliff1066tm)

Missouri U.S. Senators Roy Blunt and Claire McCaskill introduced bipartisan legislation yesterday to protect sexual assault victims in the military from aggressive pretrial proceedings. 

The bill, whose cosponsors include Democrat Barbara Boxer of California and Republican Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, amends Article 32 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, which details pretrial investigations. 

(Kate Essig/St. Louis Public Radio)

Nearly 100 activists rallied for immigration reform outside the federal courthouse in St. Louis this morning, calling on the U.S. House of Representatives to vote on a new immigration reform bill (HR 15.)

The bipartisan bill passed the Senate this summer and includes a pathway to citizenship and tougher border security, but has yet to be brought to a vote in the House. 

(Erin Williams/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis leaders, advocates and fast-food workers met today at City Hall to discuss how low wages impact fast-food workers and taxpayers.

The hearing was organized by Jobs with Justice’s Workers’ Rights Board and featured testimony from workers about the realities of living with low wages. Several of them spoke about how, despite their work, they still rely on government programs to get by.

(via Flickr/rosmary)

Registered nurses at Des Peres Hospital  have successfully negotiated their first contract as members of a union.

The Des Peres nurses joined the National Nurses Organizing Committee in 2012. The deal ratified on Thursday adjusts job security protections, bars mandatory overtime, and establishes a committee of nurses to work with hospital management to improve patient care. The agreement also provides for wage increases and secures the nurses’ employer-paid health coverage.

(via Flickr/The Confluence)

After more than 15 years of advocating for the land where the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers meet, the Confluence Partnership is ending.  

The Confluence Partnership began with five organizations working together to protect and promote land around the confluence. Over the years, the Confluence Partnership has worked with dozens of nonprofits and government agencies on projects ranging from river cleanups to land acquisition.

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