Katie Cook | St. Louis Public Radio

Katie Cook

Production Intern

Katie Cook joined St. Louis Public Radio as the Production Intern in January 2015 and assists in the production of St. Louis On The Air and Cityscape.  She has a diverse professional history which includes teaching English in Italy and cheese mongering, but a passion for audio storytelling led her to seek experience in public radio.

Katie graduated from Baylor University with a Bachelor of Arts in International Studies and enjoys doing improv comedy, taking road trips, volunteering with Ready Readers, and collecting houseplants and musical instruments.  

Improvisers Phoebe Richards and Chris Clark in an improv scene
Larry Vorpmi

When you think of improv comedy, you’re more likely to think of Chicago than St. Louis.

 

Chicago has well known theaters like The Second City and iO, which have given many famous actors and actresses their start. But St. Louis has a theater of its own, and while it may be under the radar, it’s attracting a growing number of students and audiences.

 

The Improv Shop opened its doors in early 2014, but it existed years before that. Its founder, Kevin McKernan, moved back to his hometown of St. Louis in 2009 after studying and performing improv in Chicago.

he Chinese Lantern Festival opens at the Missouri Botanical Garden on May 23.
Stephanie Lecci / St. Louis Public Radio

A popular attraction that debuted in St. Louis a few years ago has returned. 

 

On Saturday night, the Missouri Botanical Garden will present the grand opening of Lantern Festival: Magic Reimagined, a display of 22 sets of Chinese lanterns constructed out of steel and silk and illuminated from the inside. 

 

 

Kaitlyn Petrin

Flute Flight is a duo performing Saturday in St. Louis that features the compatibility between conventional silver flutes and Native American style flutes.

Courtesy of PBS

Four St. Louis girls were selected to star in an episode of the PBS show SciGirls, which challenges middle school girls and their professional mentors to become citizen scientists by using skills in science, technology, engineering and math.

In the episode titled “Frog Whisperers,” the girls volunteer for FrogWatch USA, a citizen science project that encourages nature enthusiasts to report frog and toad calls in a given area.

Host Don Marsh was joined by (from L to R) Erica Barnell, Cliff Holekamp and Ian Schillebeeckx.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Founded in 2013, IDEA Labs is a bioengineering design and entrepreneurship incubator at Washington University in which engineering and medical students work on unmet needs in healthcare to present entrepreneurial solutions.

Some of their primary objectives are to develop a culture of innovation at Washington University School of Medicine, and to teach engineering and medical students the skills and processes needed to invent and implement new biomedical technologies.

The Whiffenpoofs of Yale
The Whiffenpoofs

Founded in 1909, the Whiffenpoofs of Yale University are the world’s oldest and best known collegiate a cappella ensemble.

They’ve performed at Carnegie Hall, at the White House, and on Saturday Night Live, and they’re performing in St. Louis this week.

Fourteen senior Yale men are selected each year to sing in the Whiffenpoofs. It’s highly competitive, not only for the prestige and tradition of the ensemble, but the travel opportunities.

Brazilian dance troupe Compagnie Käfig
Agathe Poupeney / (Provided by Dance St. Louis)

Fans of dance in St. Louis are in for a treat this weekend, with National Dance Week - St. Louis taking over Grand Center and an exciting dance performance at the Touhill Performing Arts Center.  

Dance St. Louis presents Compagnie Käfig, a male Brazilian dance troupe that has been selling out performances on their U.S. tour and will perform at the Touhill this weekend.

(via Flickr/mike matney)

The city of St. Louis will soon have a civilian oversight board. And, new police cameras in the city aim to reduce crime, but do they infringe on privacy?

Those were just two of the topics before our legal roundtable guests, our monthly show that takes a look at relevant issues pertaining to the law.

Item displayed at “Capturing Hearts and Minds: Images of Nazi Propaganda and Disinformation” at the Holocaust Museum and Learning Center
Julia Bishop-Cross / via Flickr

Two St. Louis exhibits closely examine the powerful role of propaganda during the rise of Nazi Germany.

The first is “Capturing Hearts and Minds: Images of Nazi Propaganda and Disinformation,” and is at the Holocaust Museum and Learning Center. The other, at the Missouri History Museum, is a traveling exhibit from the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum called, “State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda.” 

Author Benjamin Percy
Jennifer Percy

A flu epidemic and nuclear war have wiped out most of America and only a small number of humans survive in an outpost known as the Sanctuary, formerly the city of St. Louis.

This is the premise of Benjamin Percy’s new novel, “The Dead Lands,” which takes place in St. Louis and mirrors the Corps of Discovery in 1804. In the novel, two characters named Lewis Meriwether and Mina Clark lead a small group west to face the dangers of mutant creatures and a brutal army in hopes of discovering a land where civilization thrives.

"Journey to Space" Director, Mark Krenzien
Saint Louis Science Center

St. Louis has played a key role in space travel. In 1959, NASA selected St. Louis company McDonnell Aircraft to build America’s first human-controlled spacecraft for Project Mercury. McDonnell Aircraft later became McDonnell Douglas, and merged with Boeing in 1997.

Boeing is one of the corporate sponsors of the Omnimax film, "Journey to Space," directed by Mark Krenzien.

“It’s a special place here in St. Louis, to have a film like this in a town so linked to aerospace and aviation,” Krenzien told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh.

Children from a St. Louis classroom who participate in the Ready Readers program.
Courtesy of Ready Readers

In celebration of D.E.A.R., “Drop Everything And Read,” day on April 12, we are taking a closer look at the importance of reading and getting books into the hands of children.  

Ready Readers is a St. Louis-based nonprofit organization dedicated to inspiring preschool age children from low-income communities to love books and develop literacy skills necessary to become readers when they enter kindergarten.

On Thursday, "St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh talked to Lisa Greening and Julia Auch of Ready Readers.

 

Children use a Little Free Library in North St. Louis.
Gina Sheridan

In celebration of D.E.A.R., “Drop Everything And Read,” day on April 12, we are taking a closer look at the importance of reading and getting books into the hands of children.  

Little Free Library is a nonprofit organization in Wisconsin that posts small mailbox-like structures in neighborhoods and fills them with free books. They’ve inspired a movement that has spread to cities throughout the country, including St. Louis.

Missouri Gov. Alexander McNair's residence was at the northwest corner of Main and Spruce Streets. Daguerreotype by Thomas M. Easterly, 1850.
Courtesy of the Missouri History Museum

Many of St. Louis’ buildings have been lost to time, disaster, or destruction. It may seem like an inevitable byproduct of progress, but what do we lose when we lose a historic building? 

“Sometimes what we lose is so much more than the physical structure, it’s our collective, shared memory,” said Andrew Wanko, public historian at the Missouri History Museum, in a conversation with “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Tuesday.

"Lost Buildings of St. Louis" is a new exhibit at the museum that shares the stories behind many of St. Louis’ lost buildings.   

Ophira Eisenberg, host of NPR's "Ask Me Another"
Dan Dion/NPR

Comedian and author Ophira Eisenberg will be in St. Louis April 16, but it won’t be her first time here, she told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Wednesday.

“I’ve done a loop around The Loop, I’ve gone to see the largest replica of the moon on a roof-deck bar,” Eisenberg joked, referring to the giant moon at the Moonrise Hotel.

Eisenberg said she expects to have an “extra good time” because this will be her first appearance in St. Louis with the popular public radio program she hosts, “Ask Me Another.”

It's a little early for baseball at Busch Stadium, but this weekend you can catch a game of beepball just outside the stadium.

Beepball is a version of softball, adapted for people who are blind or visually impaired. Along with some slight modifications of the rules, it features a beeping ball and two buzzing bases. Players wear blindfolds, except for the pitcher and catcher, who are actually on the same team, and two spotters.

Dr. Ken Haller, far left, Joan Lipkin and John Schmidt are participating in next week's Briefs Festival. The trio talked to 'Cityscape' host Steve Potter, far right, about the event on March 20, 2015, at St. Louis Public Radio in St. Louis.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

What do a gay mermaid looking for love, a Jewish mother who competitively wants her single son to have the biggest wedding, and a lesbian version of Dr. Seuss have in common?

They are all themes in this year’s Briefs Festival of Short LGBT Plays, a festival that brings together numerous directors and actors to showcase the work of eight different playwrights under one roof.

The eight plays being performed at the festival on March 27-29 at the Centene Center for the Arts have been selected out of more than 170 submissions from across the country.

In 2010, Marshall the Miracle Dog was rescued from deplorable conditions in southwest Missouri.
(Courtesy: Jay L. Kanzler)

After its world premiere at the St. Louis International Film Festival, "Marshall the Miracle Dog" is ready for another St. Louis showing.

Former FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III
Used with permission/St. Louis Speakers Series

Robert S. Mueller III became director of the FBI in 2001, just one week before the Sept. 11 attacks. He then had the enormous responsibility of leading the agency through a transformation into the threat-based, intelligence-led organization it is today.

Mueller spoke to St. Louis Public Radio's Katie Cook about the changes the FBI underwent post 9/11, and the many efforts its agents made to better serve the country’s changing needs.

David Choi demonstrates the grill for Steve Potter and Ligaya Figueras on Feb. 3, 2015, at Seoul Q in St. Louis.
Katie Cook / St. Louis Public Radio

It all started in the kitchen of David Choi’s grandma. It was there that Choi fell in love with the flavors of Korean barbecue and the communal act of eating together, and got the idea for Seoul Taco. Choi's Korean-Mexican fusion food truck hit the streets in 2011 and one year later became a brick-and-mortar restaurant off the Delmar Loop.