Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Kelly Moffitt

Online Producer

Kelly Moffitt joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2015 as an online producer for St. Louis Public Radio's talk shows St. Louis on the Air.

Kelly was born in St. Louis and returned to the area after a period away in Los Angeles, Moscow and Columbia, wanting to know more about the city she grew up in. She holds three degrees from the University of Missouri; a BA in International Studies, a BJ in Magazine Journalism, and she graduated with honors in 2013 with an MA in Journalism, writing a thesis on community engagement efforts in the news. After returning to St. Louis, Kelly worked for the St. Louis Business Journal and the Center of Creative Arts. Now and again, you'll also find her slipping Big Lebowski references into stories she contributes to Missouri Life magazine. 

Protesters linked arms on Sept. 15, 2017 in downtown St. Louis on Tucker St.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Programming note: St. Louis on the Air will return at 10 p.m. with a special live check-in with St. Louis Public Radio reporters and editors covering the community's response to the Stockley verdict. You can listen live and follow updates from our Twitter account at @STLonAir.

The audio embedded below is from an earlier version of the program, which aired at 12 p.m.

"A Small Band," Glenn Ligon's work inspired by the Harlem Six and Steve Reich's composition, sits in the Pulitzer Art Foundation's main hall.
Pulitzer Arts Foundation

Fifty-four works. Forty-two artists. A meditation on the colors blue and black. 

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation’s current leading exhibition “Blue Black,” curated by acclaimed Brooklyn-based artist Glenn Ligon, is on display until Oct. 7 and asks the viewer to contemplate identity, power and race.

airpix | Flickr

The words “Alcoholics Anonymous” are synonymous with addiction treatment, but the people behind an alternative therapy hope that those dealing with addiction know there are other forms of treatment out there.

Arthur Shenker, a St. Louis-based facilitator who was at one time addicted to cocaine, and Dr. Joseph Gerstein, the founder and president of SMART Recovery, joined St. Louis on the Air on Thursday to discuss their program’s approach to treating addiction with cognitive behavioral therapy.

Ron Himes, Beverly Foster and Dr. John Morris discussed how Alzheimer's disease impacts African-American patients and families.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

African-Americans over the age of 70 are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease as white people. While there are no answers, said Dr. John Morris, director of the Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Washington University, there are some factors that might be contributing to this gap.

Dogs and cats acting strangely? On Tuesday's St. Louis on the Air, an animal behaviorist stepped in to answer your questions about animal behavior.
tohu | Flickr

Dr. Debra Horwitz, DVM, a St. Louis-based veterinary behaviorist and veterinarian joined St. Louis on the Air again on Tuesday to share her pet wisdom and answer listeners’ questions about their dogs and cats. 

Here are some of the most pressing questions posed to Horwitz, of Veterinary Behavior Consultations, during the noon hour along with her answers.

Does tone matter when it comes to addressing dogs and cats?

Agnes Wilcox and Freeman Word
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated on September 8, 2017:

A re-mix of “Then, and Now Again, a Workers’ Opera" will be performed on Sunday, September 10 at 1:00 p.m. at the Missouri History Museum in memory of Agnes Wilcox who passed away on August 28. The production will be directed by Freeman Word and is free and open to the public.

Famed author Salman Rushdie, visiting St. Louis this weekend to discuss his most recent novel, “The Golden House,” says that if you want to be a good writer, “you need to get into a lot of different kinds of rooms.”

He was referencing his knowledge of and imagination with the setting of his latest novel: a secluded garden in New York only accessible by the people whose homes abut the property. 

The Rep's 51st season.
(Courtesy: The Rep)

This week, The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis launches into the second half of its first century, embarking on its 51st season. It features a robust, wide-ranging lineup of productions from musicals to classics to two Tony Award-winning productions.

Steven Woolf, the theater company’s artistic director who recently announced he will retire from the company in two years, said the company is keeping up its momentum from its landmark 50th anniversary year.

Marie Griffith, director of the Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University, and John Danforth, a former Republican U.S. Senator from Missouri.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Late last month former U.S. Senator from Missouri John Danforth published an op-ed in the Washington Post in which he called President Donald Trump the “most divisive president in our history.” He called for fellow Republicans to disavow Trump’s divisive tactics and redefine the Republican party.

Dana Hotle, Kyle Lombard and Adam Manness dicussed the Chamber Project of Saint Louis' 10th season.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Can the story of the famed Dred Scott decision be effectively put to music? In this tenth year of the Chamber Project Saint Louis, composer Adam Manness is giving it a try.

Danielle Lee, visiting assistant professor at SIUE and advocate on access in STEM fields, joined host Don Marsh to discuss diversity in the sciences.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

While there’s a rising growth in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) jobs in the United States, there’s a dwindling number of Americans interested in and qualified for pursuing such careers. Animal behavioral scientist and Southern Illinois State University-Edwardsville visiting professor Danielle Lee wants to change that, particularly with populations traditionally underrepresented in those fields – women and minorities.

Marty Kady of Politico
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with Marty Kady, editorial director of Politico Pro, a paywalled subscription service of multiplatform political news entity Politico. The news service is for policy wonks, lobbyists and other Capitol Hill insiders, punching in at over $3,000 per year for a subscription.

“We try to understand the underpinning politics of individuals making decisions so we can explain substantive policy better,” Kady said.

St. Louis-based author Ridley Pearson.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

This interview was re-broadcast on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Monday (Labor Day), September 4.

Originally published April 4, 2017:

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh was joined by bestselling St. Louis author Ridley Pearson to discuss his Disney side.

Maggie Menefee, Sylvia Jackson and Kristin Bulin work to assist victims of domestic violence.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

This interview was re-broadcast on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Monday (Labor Day), September 4.

Originally published April 4, 2017:

An illustration of Missouri death-row inmate Marcellus Williams.
Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, we went Behind the Headlines to delve into the news that Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens granted a stay of execution for Marcellus Williams.

Choosing a wine can be a daunting task. Here are some tips to make it a little easier.
Sauce Magazine

Sound Bites is produced in partnership with Sauce Magazine, our monthly installment exploring cuisine in the St. Louis area.

If you’ve ever found yourself in the grocery store aisle, out to eat with family or friends or arriving to a BYOB party, you may have experienced that moment of crippling insecurity: do I go for the wine I know I like or the wine that will make me sound like I know what I’m doing? Oh, you haven’t experienced this? Maybe that’s just us here at St. Louis on the Air then…

A crane lifts the top off the Confederate Memorial in Forest Park on Thursday, June 8, 2017. A spokesman for Mayor Lyda Krewson says it will take a while to remove the entire piece.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

A teacher at New City School in St. Louis is using the controversy over Confederate monuments, including the recently-removed Confederate Memorial in Forest Park, to teach fifth graders about diversity, inclusion and conflict resolution.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, we heard from that teacher, Stephanie Teachout Allen, who also serves as director of diversity and inclusion at the school, and David Cunningham, a professor of sociology at Washington University, about how they have hosted these conversations with children and others in their lives.

Our monthly legal roundtable returns to discuss pressing issues of the law with Bill Freivogel, Rachel Sachs and Mark Smith.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, our monthly Legal Roundtable convened to discuss pressing issues of the law.

DiAnne Mueller, the Chief Executive Officer of the Saint Louis Crisis Nursery.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed the prevention of child abuse in the St. Louis region with DiAnne Mueller, the Chief Executive Officer of the Saint Louis Crisis Nursery

The organization provides emergecy intervention, respite care and family support. The five nurseries and nine outreach centers under the Saint Louis Crisis Nursery umbrella serve more than 6,800 children every year. Over the past 31 years, they’ve served over 110,000 children.

Two eclipse chasers at Steampunk Brew Works in Town and Country retrofitted steampunk-style glasses wtih welder's lenses to view the eclipse.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Did you hear? A major celestial event crossed the Missouri and Illinois skies on Monday, Aug. 21. St. Louis on the Air had you covered with a two-hour special during the eclipse.

From 12 – 2 p.m. on Monday, St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh brought you a two-hour special program about the total solar eclipse, discussing the cultural, scientific, economic, and celestial phenomena.

A list of suggested items to pack for eclipse chasing, which include a hat, sunscreen, water bottle, picnic blanket, a book on eclipses, snacks, a roll of toilet paper, eclipse glasses, prescription medicine, a camera and a phone.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

We’re narrowing in on the day of the total solar eclipse, Aug. 21. Ahead of a weekend that’s expected to see a lot of travel to the region, we check in with the Missouri State Highway Patrol for updates on traffic and how to drive during the eclipse, the Missouri Division of Tourism and a Festus-based brewery prepping for the onslaught.

Related: What to expect from the rare solar eclipse

Marine gets his wounds treated during operations in Huế City, 1968
National Archives and Records Administration | Wikimedia Commons

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, Ken Burns and Lynn Novick joined host Don Marsh to discuss their latest collaboration a 10-part PBS documentary, titled “The Vietnam War.”

"I don't think we ever said enough about it," Burns said of the war and how it has been covered after it ended. "... With the passage of time comes perspective."

Listen to the full conversation below:

Adam Frick, the founder of Hugmonster Sound, has turned his ears to new project: podcasts for kids.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Last year, we held a local podcasting panel to help bring new St. Louis podcasters into the fold. In the lead up to that event, we spoke with Adam Frick, the founder of Hugmonster Sound, about his podcasting network STL Vernacular.

Jonathan Losos, author, "Improbable Destinies: Fate, Chance, and the Future of Evolution."
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Native St. Louisan Jonathan Losos is a Harvard University biology professor and director of Losos Laboratory at the university. He recently wrote the book “Improbable Destinies: Fate, Chance and the Future of Evolution.

The book follows researchers across the world who are using experimental evolutionary science to learn more about our role in the natural world.

Astronomers Studying an Eclipse painted by Antoine Caron in 1571
Wikimedia Commons

The furor over the coming solar eclipse is reaching a fever pitch, causing us to ask: has it always been this way? On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed the ways eclipses have been viewed in the past.

From Babylonians’ scientific tracking of eclipses to frequent myth and lore about the relationship between solar eclipses and animal feeding habits, we discussed how old views of solar eclipses impact our viewing of them today.

How can you protect yourself from the spate of spams targeting older Americans?
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

In 2011, one in four nursing home residents on Medicare was hospitalized. It’s an issue that impacts many facets of health care, from quality of life for nursing home residents to spending of taxpayer dollars, and on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with a University of Missouri Nursing School professor about ways to reduce avoidable hospital admissions.

Stephen Zwolak discussed how to transition kids into the new enviornment of preschool and kindgergarten on today's St. Louis on the Air.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s that time of year again: children are heading back to school, some for the first time. On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the ways parents, family members and caregivers can support young children in making a successful transition into school life.

Joining the program to discuss was Stephen Zwolak, the CEO of the LUME Institute and Executive Director of the University City Children’s Center.

Don't know how to view the eclipse or what to look for? Never fear! We've assembled a panel to teach you how to become an amateur astronomer.
J Lippold | Flickr

So you’ve never viewed a solar eclipse before? Not surprising, unless you’re a severe umbraphile or were alive 148 years ago. That was the last time a total solar eclipse passed over Missouri on Aug. 7, 1869.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, a week before the total solar eclipse that will pass over the southern parts of the St. Louis region, we discussed how to view the eclipse as an amateur astronomer. What should you be looking for? What kind of experimentation can you do? How can you help your kids experience the eclipse?

Sara Sitzer, artistic director, Gesher Music Festival.
(Courtesy Gesher Music Festival)

The Gesher Music Festival embarked on its seventh year this week celebrating “chamber music with a Jewish twist.” The word “Gesher” means “bridge” in Hebrew and the purpose of the festival is to tie different groups of people together.

Crystal Martin, Haley Shoaf and Tamarah Usher discuss  the challenges women in the tech and startup world face.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Last week, news began circulating of a controversial internal memo, written by a former senior software engineer at Google, titled “Google’s Ideological Echo Chamber,” which called for Google to replace diversity initiatives with “ideological diversity” initiatives.

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