Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Kelly Moffitt

Online Producer

Kelly Moffitt joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2015 as an online producer for St. Louis Public Radio's talk shows St. Louis on the Air.

Kelly was born in St. Louis and returned to the area after a period away in Los Angeles, Moscow and Columbia, wanting to know more about the city she grew up in. She holds three degrees from the University of Missouri; a BA in International Studies, a BJ in Magazine Journalism, and she graduated with honors in 2013 with an MA in Journalism, writing a thesis on community engagement efforts in the news. After returning to St. Louis, Kelly worked for the St. Louis Business Journal and the Center of Creative Arts. Now and again, you'll also find her slipping Big Lebowski references into stories she contributes to Missouri Life magazine. 

LillyLedbetter.com

Lilly Ledbetter, the woman behind the employment discrimination case Ledbetter vs. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., will visit the area this week as part of the Women’s Foundation of Greater St. Louis’ Making a Difference 2015. On Tuesday, she spoke with “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh about her women’s rights activism following the discovery that she was only paid $3,727 per month compared to 15 other men in similar positions at Goodyear Tire who earned from $4,286 to $5,236 per month.

Alex Heuer

September is World Alzheimer’s Month and statistics from the recently released ‘World Alzheimer Report 2015’ show that by 2050, an estimated 131.5 million people across the globe will have dementia. Currently, that number sits at about 46.8 million people worldwide. A shift in the proportional growth of older populations is the root cause of that increase, but still, the numbers are startling.

Ernest Brooks

In 2015, it is hard to imagine a scuba diving trip that would not include at least 400 selfies. Not the case for world-renowned ocean photographer Ernest Brooks, whose exhibition "Silver Seas: An Odyssey" is now on display at the International Photography Hall of Fame.


Aine O'Connor, St. Louis Public Radio

Next week, New Line Theatre will celebrate its 25th anniversary by opening the regional premiere of “Heathers” in its brand-new digs: The Marcelle Theater, a new 150-seat black box theatre space in Grand Center built by Ken and Nancy Kranzberg.

It’s a move back to a black box for Artistic Director Scott Miller, which he says he has been hoping to do for years. In addition to changing up the set design, a challenge Scenic and Lighting Designer Rob Lippert is eager to meet, the move also heralds a change in show lineup: The theatre company will now do four shows per season.

Kelly Moffitt, St. Louis Public Radio

If you’ve been to the St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Dogtown, or even stepped foot in John D. McGurk’s in Soulard, you probably understand how a town with such Irish heritage as St. Louis could shape a future U.S. Ambassador to Ireland. Kevin O’Malley, the native St. Louisan who is now serving in that role, paid a diplomatic visit to the “St. Louis on the Air” studio on Thursday to talk with host Don Marsh about what he does.

Kelly Moffitt, St. Louis Public Radio

When she was just 17 years old, Zuhal Sultan founded the National Youth Orchestra of Iraq during a time of great turmoil in her country. A pianist herself, she wanted to unite fellow Iraqi youth through music, paving a path to peace by bringing together members from the country’s many varied religions and sects.

Kelly Moffitt, St. Louis Public Radio

After the Ferguson Commission's report was released last week, St. Louisans across the region seemed to be echoing a common refrain: “But what can I do with it?” That was a question that “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh tried to answer at Monday night’s public town hall “Ferguson Commission:  Where Do We Go From Here?”

Wellspring Church in Ferguson, September 21, 2015.
Kelly Moffitt, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 1:20 p.m., Sept. 22, with audio - Change can come to the St. Louis region, but people throughout the area have to be willing to do the work.

That was the message Monday night at a roundtable at Wellspring Church in Ferguson looking at the 189 recommendations outlined in the report of the Ferguson Commission.


Want to hear Part Two of the two-part "Ferguson Commission: Where Do We Go From Here?" panel? You can find it here

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

The Ferguson Commission has released its long-awaited report filled with calls to action for St. Louis government, the criminal justice system and the community. Join St. Louis Public Radio for a public town hall on Monday, Sept. 21, to discuss the report’s recommendations and what can be done to make them a reality beyond Ferguson and effect positive changes in the area.

Courtesy of the artist

Sure, you know La Vie en Rose. How could we not include the song that put the legendary French chanteuse Édith Piaf on the map? But do you know these others? Elsie Parker and Wayne Coniglio of Elsie Parker and the Poor People of Paris, a local band that specializes in popular French music and jazz, shared the backstories of three other Piaf songs you should know on Friday’s “Cityscape” with host Steve Potter. 

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

On Monday, “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh led a legal roundtable to talk about local and national legal issues pressing our region today. Uber and anti-trust law were a big focus of the hour, along with the legal implications of the Ferguson Commission’s recommendations, the possibility of minimum wage increases in Missouri, police use of force, the Kim Davis saga and more.

Listen here for the full rundown:

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

A group of performers from the Hindu Temple of St. Louis joined Batya Abramson-Goldstein, the executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council, on “Cityscape” this Friday as part of preparations for this Sunday’s fifth annual Arts and Faith interfaith concert at the Sheldon, which promotes peace and unity in the region and around the world.

We had the pleasure to hear (and mic up!) nine of the Hindu Temple Choir performers live on air. The choir usually performs at full capacity with 18 members. 

Missouri Senate

Updated at 4:38 p.m. on Sept. 17 with audio - On Thursday’s “St. Louis on the Air,” state Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal, D-University City, announced her resignation as a member of the University City School Board.

Bridgeton Landfill
Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

On Thursday’s “St. Louis on the Air,” host Don Marsh brought together several different parties to talk about ongoing community concerns over radioactive contamination at the Bridgeton and West Lake landfills. He was joined by: 

  • Véronique LaCapra - St. Louis Public Radio’s science reporter. She has reported extensively on the situation at both landfills

  • Dawn Chapman - Citizen activist

  • Mike Petersen – Chief of Public Affairs, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

When it comes to priorities, Marie-Hélène Bernard will not be easily swayed. When asked by “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh whether she prefers to open her first season as president of the St. Louis Symphony  or throw out the first pitch at a Cardinals game, she made it clear that it doesn’t matter what she’s doing so long as it is connecting the local community to the symphony.

“Both are so, so exciting … exciting in a way that gets me to know the community,” said Bernard. “It is a really wonderful city.”

Meds and Food For Kids

On a typical day in 2010, Joseph Volcy found himself sitting outside of his church after choir practice when he felt a great tremble, “like a bulldozer on the road.” He looked up, and from his seat on a bench, he saw half of a mountain come down behind his church. Then came the dust.

“I didn’t know what was going on,” Volcy said. “No one could see where they were going. When I left the church to go home, I couldn’t. I saw a lot of people on the back of taxis and people being brought to the hospital, where some of them died. But I still couldn’t tell what was going on.”

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

After bursting onto the Missouri political scene in 2004 during a daring bid to replace retiring U.S. Congressman Dick Gephardt, Jeff Smith seemed like he could do no wrong. His grassroots political campaign to launch from unknown into the U.S. House of Representatives is considered one of the most successful in history—even though he narrowly lost to Russ Carnahan. The critically-acclaimed documentary “Can Mr. Smith Get to Washington Anymore?” followed that campaign. Smith went on to become a Missouri Senator, representing parts of St. Louis. 

Photo courtesy of the artist.

There’s no reason  for fans of the man who “defined cool” to be “Kind of Blue” this weekend as the Miles Davis Memorial project plans to unveil its sculpture of the renowned jazz musician in Alton.  A musical celebration that will put a swing in the step of local jazz aficionados will accompany the unveiling.

Jerry Naunheim Jr

The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis’ “All the Way” opens Friday night and takes on subject matter from the 1960s that may seem just as pertinent in theaters today as it would have back then. The Rep’s 49th season opener focuses on the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson, one of the most controversial presidents in recent memory, as he navigates the civil rights era and the Vietnam War, mincing no words along the way. 

Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

Mohammad and Samira Said are two of the 29 Syrian refugees that have been resettled in St. Louis in the past year. They came here in June after leaving Syria in 2013 in the midst of a war that has brought destruction to the country.

Áine O'Connor

After the resignations of Rep. John Diehl, R-Town and Country, and Sen. Paul LeVota, D- Independence, earlier this year following realizations of sexually explicit texts and advances toward college-aged interns, the public’s eye has turned not just to the political decisions of Missouri lawmakers but the culture in Jefferson City as well.

Public faith in those serving the public good at the Capitol seems to have taken a serious hit.

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