Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Kelly Moffitt

Online Producer

Kelly Moffitt joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2015 as an online producer for St. Louis Public Radio's talk shows St. Louis on the Air.

Kelly was born in St. Louis and returned to the area after a period away in Los Angeles, Moscow and Columbia, wanting to know more about the city she grew up in. She holds three degrees from the University of Missouri; a BA in International Studies, a BJ in Magazine Journalism, and she graduated with honors in 2013 with an MA in Journalism, writing a thesis on community engagement efforts in the news. After returning to St. Louis, Kelly worked for the St. Louis Business Journal and the Center of Creative Arts. Now and again, you'll also find her slipping Big Lebowski references into stories she contributes to Missouri Life magazine. 

St. Louis International Film Festival

Nick Berardini was just a journalism student at the University of Missouri when he was sent out on an assignment that would impact his life and his career as a filmmaker. He was sent to Moberly, Missouri to report on a man who died while in police custody after being pulled over for drunk driving.

St. Louis International Film Festival

After Michael Vick was convicted for involvement in a long-running illegal dog-fighting ring, more than 50 pit bulls were left behind. What happened to them? A St. Louis International Film Festival documentary, “The Champions,” answers just that question. It also delves into the discrimination pit bulls face as a breed across the United States…sometimes for unfounded reasons.

Image courtesy of Kyrle Boldt III

Modern art, architecture and decorative arts created in the middle of the 20th century were swamped by the reactionary ruckus of the late 20th century post-modernist movement. 

Given the quality and originality of so much of the mid-century’s aesthetic industry, its relegation to obscurity was a big mistake and a now recognized lapse of taste. However, all wasn’t lost. A new exhibition opening this weekend at the St. Louis Art Museum joins other scholarship and exhibitions dedicated to setting the record straight.

St. Louis International Film Festival

For years, Dr. Susan Mackinnon, a professor and plastic surgeon with Washington University, has been working to restore movement in paralyzed limbs through a specialized peripheral-nerve-transfer surgery. Now, her work is coming to light through a documentary screening at the St. Louis International Film Festival next week: “A Spark of Nerve.”

Here at St. Louis Public Radio we know our listeners rely on us for to provide context, quality storytelling, and deep dives into the characters behind today’s news. We’re applying this approach to bring you reviews from this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival organized by the issues facing St. Louis and the surrounding area.

Each day reviews will be organized by issue as explored in select films from the festival. These categories are not literal representations of how these topics manifest in St. Louis but maintain a broader look into the various perspectives we use to address these concerns.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Smartphones, tablets, computers at home, computers at school, computers at the library, augmented reality, video games…the list of new platforms that children have available to engage with goes on for miles. Although the platforms for media consumption may be shiny and new, that doesn’t exactly change the way parents should approach media exposure for their children.

Still from feature film "First Secret City"
St. Louis International Film Festival

Cinema St. Louis’ St. Louis International Film Festival starts next week on November 5, bringing with it a group of films that are sure to inspire some conversation around town. “The First Secret City” is one of them.

Photo courtesy of the artists.© Steven and William Ladd, All rights Reserved, 2015.

When William and Steven Ladd were 15 years old, they could often be found in the Delmar Loop, buying beads and doing macramé. Though they now work out of a bustling studio in Chelsea, New York, the same childhood collaboration that could be found outside of Blueberry Hill is still at play in their works of contemporary art.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/garrettziegler/3492178866/in/photolist-6jAk7s-pPFbAG-pPFboN-pRLLJt-pzhbFz-pRLMZV-pznDXu-d5J1eY-d5J2Uq-aysF4o-pzhaR8-pzkBVV-pRQZgb-pzhbTZ-oUYoKH-pPFarN-pznEzb-apVpNY-6Y7ktm-3zJDwG-cMU3U-aysFnj-aysFAw-cMU2B-aysFsA-9AQKXE-cMTXZ-
Garrett Ziegler, Flickr, Creative Commons

Do your kids need to settle down before a sugar-infused round of trick-or-treating? Does your spooky drive down an abandoned road need a soundtrack? Do you just want to get into the Halloweekend mood?

We have the perfect audio for you: excerpts from a dramatic retelling of the classic “Legend of Sleepy Hollow” from local historic interpreter, Anne Williams.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

To touch the subject matter of King David, “a man after God’s own heart” (Acts 13:22), is a daunting prospect.

Geraldine Brooks is up to the task. The journalist and Pulitzer-prize winning fiction author, who has written about everything from the hidden world of Islamic women to the Sarajevo Haggadah, one of the oldest surviving Jewish illuminated texts.

Scarefest Haunted Houses

The National Retail Federation recently found that 157 million Americans will celebrate Halloween this year. Not impressed? That equates to over $6.9 billion in spending—on costumes, parties, candy and…wait for it…boo! Haunted houses. Nearly 20 percent of those 157 million will step foot in a haunted house this season alone.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ruthanddave/412229675/in/photolist-CqMwc-4bPyGE-jXFXLR-asFqCy-95iTDe-pK1D1g-7zob7o-kfNWn-eeGx2B-8UZP8d-7trjA4-d3icXY-aCHxAV-eShUWp-pVSjEX-4SknrF-rBR7xx-aQMbzK-wNFRuG-rBR8jT-6TvTzd-rBR5gj-b8kida-rBR7YJ-8pLFdT-5yusgx-4WhP1D-5w9
Ruth Hartnup, Flickr, Creative Commons

Jake, a caller from St. Louis during Tuesday’s “St. Louis on the Air,” had a question that is, plain and simple, a hard one to ask when looking at end-of-life decisions with no one else to turn to.

“I am the last surviving member of my family,” said Jake. “Having no friends or family, what happens to my things? What happens to me?”

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Whether you admire or admonish them, the wiz kids of Wall Street have been fodder for conversations around the American dinner table for decades. Who was responsible for making it such a hot topic?

On Tuesday’s “St. Louis on the Air,” host Don Marsh discussed some of the 14 “financial visionaries” that author Edward Morris has identified as the critical figures who “wrote the rules of American finance.”

Aine O'Connor

Bound in a straitjacket. Wrapped in 50 feet of chain. Tied in ropes.

Then, connected to a wooden yoke, sealed in a canvas bag and locked in a shipping crate.

All part of a day’s work for local “Doctor of Escapology,” Judas Lynch, whose current pirate-themed escape act will be on display at the City Museum’s first age-21+ event, “Falling Awake,” next Thursday night.

Margie Walsh, Saint Louis Science Center

At 8 feet, 11 inches, Robert Wadlow, of Alton, was the tallest man on record to walk the earth. He was also friends with Robert Ripley, who was widely known for his comic strip, radio show, television show and collection of 32 “odditoriums,”which display rare, and strange, artifacts from around the world. Those collections are known as “Ripley’s Believe It Or Not!”

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

Miriam School, Miriam Learning Center and Miriam Switching Post all exist to serve a singular purpose: helping to educate children with complex learning disabilities. On Thursday, a student, parent and the head of school joined “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh in discussing raising a child with a learning disability.

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

Professors Kathryn Edin and Luke Shaefer were startled to recently find a trend in American poverty that they hadn’t seen since the mid-1990s: the number of American households living on around $2, per person, per day has reached 1.5 million, including 3 million children.

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

Father Matt Ruhl has been exposed to poverty and violence all over the world. One of his first assignments as a Jesuit was to lead a classroom at St. John’s College in Belize. Following that experience, he came to the St. Louis are to serve in urban parishes in East St. Louis and North St. Louis. In 2011, he returned to Belize, serving as the pastor of St. Martin de Porres Parish in Belize City.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/quinnanya/16947572566/in/photolist-rPAJT1-aj8f9w-9kqYcW-91oWcA-bjwcHR-6WZont-8XesxG-7CGFTw-bpYAaN-9ruCp8-7v9UMe-9cTTjT-99chM8-boBk3y-dsfCka-7WhFzb-9fGQN3-9tQQmC-8xR2GR-9v6F5E-a8KhrE-84EkLU-aD5BnN-8S9UNm-6rzpPX-8NG1mx-6UpmQH-9
Quinn Dombrowski, Flickr, Creative Commons

Nationwide, there are more expulsions in preschool than any other grade level.

In Missouri, one out of every 10 preschool-age children is expelled. Deeper into that statistic, African American boys are three times more likely to be expelled than other children in preschool.

http://kathrineswitzer.com/press-room/photos/
AP Images, Kathrine Switzer

The first woman to officially enter and run the Boston Marathon, in 1967, did so under the gender-neutral entry “K.V. Switzer.” When race officials found out she was a woman, one race director physically attacked her for wearing an official bib number in the race. That moment was caught on camera and made headlines around the world, later becoming one of Time-Life’s “100 Photos that Changed the World.” Her full name is Kathrine Switzer.

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio.

The founder and producing director of St. Louis’ Black Repertory Company, Ron Himes, was a freshman in high school the first time he was exposed to a live play. And then, it was only under extenuating circumstances.

“I think it was only because I was in the honors group,” Himes said on Friday’s “Cityscape.” “The students in the honors group got to go to cultural events, which didn’t make any sense. It seemed like everybody but the honors group needed it.”

Jimmy Álvarez, Flickr, Creative Commons

You’ve been there: It’s late, you’ve waited hours to step up to the mic, you’ve reached the bottom of your soggy basket of fried pickles and the duo who thinks there’s a talent scout in the audience has gone up to sing “You’re the One That I Want” for the third time.  All you want is to humbly karaoke some Nelly, or possibly, some Alanis Morisette.  Will it ever happen?

Ferguson Farmers Market

The oldest, still-operating farmers market in St. Louis, Soulard Farmers Market, has a history that stretches back over 200 years. But it is only in the past 15 that the local food scene has exploded across other municipalities in the region, bringing with it smaller markets and more opportunities for local growers to sell their produce and products.

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

What’s the big deal with the organ these days? It’s big, bulky and often associated with boring church music or, worse, funeral homes. That’s not the full story, according to organist Paul Jacobs, the first and only person to win a Grammy for his organ-playing. He’s trying to change the organ’s perception by teaming up with local favorite, famed soprano Christine Brewer for a new CD and tour.

Damon Tweedy

In 2014, the Association of American Medical Colleges found that 4 percent of the nation’s physicians are African American. That’s compared with 13 percent of the total U.S. population. White physicians, on the other hand, make up 48.9 percent of the profession.

Flickr | steakpinball

After every school shooting, the push to reform gun laws becomes the object of much debate. Ultimately, not much changes. Will the shooting that took place last week at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Oregon have any different legal response? Monday’s “Legal Roundtable” discussed the subject with “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh, among other pressing legal matters of the day.

Busch Stadium
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

The St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs baseball rivalry is the stuff of legend.  The teams and their rabid fan-bases now have the chance to put the walk in their talk as the two battle it out in the National League Division Series.

Tied at one game apiece, the Cubs and the Cardinals play this evening at Wrigley Field. We thought we’d have a little good, old-fashioned public radio fun by agreeing to a friendly wager with WBEZ, the public radio station in Chicago.

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

Erin Bode, Brian Owens, Diane Reeves, Betty Carter, Wynton Marsalis, Joshua Redman, David Sanborn…these are just some of the names in local piano legend Peter Martin’s figurative rolodex. He’s performed with them all, and he’s crossed off every name on his musical bucket list—except for one.

St. Louis Women's Hope Chorale

When Leanne Magnuson Latuda originally thought about conducting a piece about soldiers’ trials during and after war for her organization’s yearly gala, she hesitated.

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

The crisis in Syria is on everyone’s minds right now—whether for humanitarian concerns, worries over ISIS or Russian involvement. Here at home, several groups have made the call to accept more Syrian refugees to the St. Louis region. So far, 29 have arrived since the beginning of this year.

Pages