Kristen Hare | St. Louis Public Radio

Kristen Hare

Kristen Hare
Book cover

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Back then, farmland stretched out around her with fields of alfalfa and corn. She could walk across the road to the Missouri River. And each spring, she’d hunt morels in the woods. 

Jane Sehnert grew up in Chesterfield Valley, before strip malls and outlet malls and highway moved in. Today, the Valley’s a bustling and busy place, more concrete than green. But the treasure she remembers from growing up aren’t gone.

“You just have to look for it a little harder.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: On Friday, April 13, 1928, an explosion at a dance hall in West Plains, Mo., killed many of the town’s young people. No one was ever charged for causing the explosion, but questions and emotions that grew out of what happened that night still simmer.

In his new novel, “The Maid’s Version,” author Daniel Woodrell looks at those events through the eyes of a fictional maid, but also through the eyes of someone who has lived in the region for a good part of his life.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Early this year, Karl Guenther told the St. Louis Beacon his new nonprofit, Invest STL, was asking people “to fund possibility and stay engaged through that.”

How? The organization planned to raise $10,000, and then award its first grant, of $2,500, from that money. The remainder would stay with Invest STL to try to grow it into a long-lasting organization, which would give out future grants. So that’s the funding possibility part.

Ken Botnick
Beacon archive | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Beginning Sept. 24, the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts will host a series of discussions focusing on important issues in St. Louis. One idea at the heart of these salons, as they're called, is that the design process offers tools for solving problems.

Eric Lundgren
Provided by Mr. Lundgren

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Eric Lundgren could tell you a bit about delayed gratification these days. The book he worked on during and after getting his master’s in fine arts at Washington University earned him an agent, but never a deal. A few years passed, Lundgren kept writing and working as a library technician in St. Louis, and then, last year, thanks to some recommendations from a fellow writer, the people at The Overlook Press came knocking (OK, they came e-mailing.)

Aronson Center rendering
Provided by Laumeier Sculpture Park

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: This Sunday, Laumeier Sculpture Park is inviting the community out for a picnic, music, games and art. But this Discover Laumeier Festival could be the last new event before new construction begins there.

L. John Schott
Beacon archive | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: You know that house that has caught your eye as you drive down such streets as Southmoor or Lindell or Forsyth? One architectural firm helped define gracious living in the 1920s and '30s. The 150 houses designed by Maritz and Young largely still stand as examples of how one firm worked with clients to produce an array of styles that all had a solid gravitas.

Angela Fowle
Provided by Foundry Art Centre

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The hum and rumble of the old train car factory quieted long ago in downtown St. Charles, but since 2004, it's been replaced with new sounds: Brush on canvas, little voices, music and talk, among other soft stirrings.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In Tom Angleberger's new book, things are going all wrong at McQuarrie Middle School. There's a new emphasis on standardized testing, and classes such as music, art and Legos are cut because of it. In "Surprise Attack of Jabba the Puppett," the group of kids that readers first met in "The Strange Case of Origami Yoda" have to work together again to figure out what's going on and how to fix it. They're guided, by the way, by a paper finger puppet Yoda.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: You can travel the world and across time through Julie Garwood’s books. The Kansas City woman has books set in medieval Scotland, in Regency England, the U.S. frontier and the present. Her novel “For the Roses” was produced as a Hallmark Hall of Fame piece on CBS, and her next romance, “Hotshot,” comes out Aug 6.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In her poems, Shirley Bradley LeFlore tells stories; and often, those stories are about women.

“I felt that women represent so much, as mothers, being a mother myself, being a girl, being an active person, a traveler, a woman that was always, from a girl, interested in watching people, listening to them,” she says. “I would say that runs through a lot of my work.”

Henry Shaw at his townhouse at 7th and Locust.
Provided by the Missouri Botanical Garden

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Nearly 155 years ago, businessman Henry Shaw opened the Missouri Botanical Garden on the hundreds of acres of prairie he'd previously purchased. With the help of pre-eminent naturalist Asa Gray, William Jackson Hooker, director of England’s Kew Gardens, and St. Louis resident Dr. George Engelmann, Shaw created a major and lasting institution.

Laura Nowlin
Provided by Ms. Nowlin

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Laura Nowlin woke up one night after a dream feeling utterly heartbroken.

The dream felt like an ending, she says.

And she thought to herself, “I’ve got to write the story that ends this way.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis-born author Linda Joffe Hull grew up with a love for books and a father who encouraged that love in his own way.

“My father encouraged us to read and wouldn’t let us read any children’s books, we had to read all the classics in elementary school,” she says. “He read us ‘Metamorphosis’ in third grade. I read ‘Catcher in the Rye’ in fourth grade. It really isn’t a book for fourth graders, but I loved to read.”

Rashad Rounds
Provided by Mr. Rounds | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Rashad Rounds grew up Olivette and graduated from Ladue Horton Watkins High School in 2001. Shortly after that, he launched himself into the LA dance scene. During his time there, Rounds -- who uses the name Wizdom Truth -- danced for Usher, on “Dancing With the Stars” and worked with major choreographers. But finding his way from St. Louis to Los Angeles wasn’t easy.

Michael Kahn
Provided by Mr. Kahn | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: During the past 10 years, St. Louis author and trial attorney Michael Kahn has written a novel under a pen name, worked at his practice and seen the last of his five children leave home. He’s also thought, from time to time, about the character that started his writing career, Rachel Gold.

“I guess over those 10 years, I would think about her at different points,” says Kahn, whose 8th book in the Rachel Gold series, “The Flinch Factor,” came out earlier this month.

Jeff Lash, Leslie Hinyard and their daughters, Brynn and Esme
Provided by the family

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Jeff Lash has a standing lunch date.

His commute involves opening his office door, plodding down carpeted steps and scooping up the bouncing 2-year-old who waits for him at the bottom each day.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: John and Sylvia Wright’s new book, “Extraordinary Black Missourians: Pioneers, Leaders, Performers, Athletes and Other Notables Who’ve Made History,” tells the stories behind the lives of more than 100 influential black Missourians.

There are the icons, such as Langston Hughes, Dred Scott and Josephine Baker, but there are also quieter, less-known people who faced tough times and still made their mark.

Sylvia and John Wright
Provided by the Wrights

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon - About five years ago, Sylvia Wright discovered a piece of history that she’d never known before. During the Revolutionary War, she learned, about a third of George Washington’s army was made up of black soldiers. Some were free, others slaves. And they fought for the founding of this country.

“I cried when I learned about it,” she says now.

She thought of her 8-year-old self in a segregated classroom at Marshall Elementary School, learning about that war.

Fireflies glow.
Tsuneaki Hiramatsu

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: This time last year, the fireflies were out in full force. But after a cool spring, they’re a week or two behind, says Tad Yankoski, an entomologist at the Sophia M. Sachs Butterfly House.

“We’re just getting into the prime time for fireflies,” he says.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri Botanical Garden pulses with green life: plants, flowers, trees, fruits, herbs and vegetables. Visits to the vast space feel peaceful, but the gardens themselves are also purposeful. They're not just lovely, they're useful and necessary.

That idea runs through the garden's year-long series, Foodology.

Peter Wyse Jackson
Provided by the Missouri Botanical Garden | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In many parts of the world, a web of gardens work to connect the past with the present, and the present with the future.

They grow in India and Israel, in Cambodia, Peru and the Bronx, in Costa Rica, Madagascar, Colombia and Sri Lanka, in South Dakota, in St. Louis, and now, for the first time, into Europe through France.

Hieroglyphics are just one element of ancient Egypt explained in the exhibit.
Provided by the Science Center | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon - With the St. Louis Science Center's new exhibit, “Lost Egypt: Ancient Secrets, Modern Science,” you can peel back the layers of an ancient civilization that continues to fascinate people.

Literally.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: On Tuesday morning, while plugging away at the week's work, I stopped for a moment to surf a bit for story ideas. I hadn't been to the Foundry's site in a while, so I headed over.

Provided by Jeff Phillips

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Carol Felzien remembers them -- her Great Aunt Edna and her Great Uncle Harry Grossmann.

Uncle Harry was her grandfather’s brother. Together, they owned Grossmann Contracting Co. Uncle Harry and Aunt Edna lived in Frontenac. He was a Mason. She belonged to the Order of the Eastern Star.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Amanda Doyle is not from St. Louis. She grew up in Memphis, Tenn., and went to high school in St. Petersburg, Fla. 

But she probably knows St. Louis way better than you do.

That’s partly occupational, perhaps. Doyle, who is the associate editor of "Where" magazine, gets to be a nosy journalist, she says. And that’s taken her all over the region.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Christopher d'Amboise has been to St. Louis a few times now to collaborate with the St. Louis Ballet, each time working with the dancers here on pieces he's already composed.

"In the process of that, I got to really know the dancers," he says, learning how quirky and interesting each one was.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: On ink and paper, working mom Jill Kaplan juggles her job, family and marriage, while trying to hold on to who she is as an individual. Her story unfolds in "“The Pajama Diaries,” by cartoonist and Washington University grad Terri Libenson. Libenson herself is a work-at-home mom, and it’s a situation she enjoys.

"I don’t have to worry about how I look,” she says. “I pretty much look the same as when I roll out of bed.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: If you flip channels around to Bravo most weeknights, you’ll see “Watch What Happens Live” host and executive producer Andy Cohen, some real housewives, some celebrities, and signs of St. Louis. Some weeks, there’s a Cardinals hat. Sometimes, there's a Lite Brite Arch on the set. Cohen, who grew up in St.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Since 1965, Vic and Grace Phillips made their home in Ballwin. There, they raised three children, including son and broadcast journalist, Stone Phillips.

Today, the Phillips live in a retirement community in North Carolina, and the years, conversations and choices it took to get them there are documented in “Moving with Grace,” a new documentary filmed and produced by Phillips.

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