Linda Holmes

Linda Holmes writes and edits NPR's entertainment and pop-culture blog, Monkey See. She has several elaborate theories involving pop culture and monkeys, all of which are available on request.

Holmes began her professional life as an attorney. In time, however, her affection for writing, popular culture and the online universe eclipsed her legal ambitions. She shoved her law degree in the back of the closet, gave its living-room space to DVD sets of The Wire and never looked back.

Holmes was a writer and editor at Television Without Pity, where she recapped several hundred hours of programming — including both High School Musical movies, for which she did not receive hazard pay. Since 2003, she has been a contributor to MSNBC.com, where she has written about books, movies, television and pop-culture miscellany.

Holmes' work has also appeared on Vulture (New York magazine's entertainment blog), in TV Guide and in many, many legal documents.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: You can call it a sheer product of capitalism, or you can call it a contemporary version of Homer's "Iliad." Actually, people call the new "Star Wars" film both of those things in the comments on Linda Holmes' latest piece for npr.org. Linda's our pop culture blogger, and she's here to talk about this ridiculous pop culture moment that is "Star Wars: The Force Awakens." Hey, Linda. LINDA HOLMES, BYLINE:...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: The Toronto International Film Festival is underway. It's the 40th year of the fest, and for a week now, our colleagues Linda Holmes and Bob Mondello have been tweeting and blogging from Toronto. Bob is our film critic and Linda is our pop culture blogger, and both liked "The Martian," by Ridley Scott and starring Matt Damon. (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "THE MARTIAN") MATT DAMON: (As Mark Watney) I'm entering...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: I'm Audie Cornish with help for those of you who are looking for something to read this summer and you don't necessarily want to escape the heat - you want romance. Luckily for you, NPR Books is focusing on romance novels this summer, and joining me now to talk about it is our pop-culture blogger, Linda Holmes. Hey there, Linda. LINDA HOLMES, BYLINE: Hello, Audie. CORNISH: So first of all, we want to...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: If you would never watch a television show like "The Bachelor," or if it's your guilty pleasure, well, a new drama called "UnREAL" may be equally appealing. (SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "UNREAL") SHIRI APPLEBY: (As Rachel) OK, well, ladies, we are just a few minutes away, so do you want to know who the suitor is? UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR #1: (As character #1) Oh, my gosh. UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR #2: (As character #2)...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "THE BREAKFAST CLUB") ANTHONY MICHAEL HALL: (As Brian Johnson) You see us as a brain, an athlete, a basket case, a princess and a criminal. AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: It's been 30 years since the John Hughes film "The Breakfast Club" sent five high school students to all-day attention, where they wrote those words about themselves. And this weekend, the film is back in theaters for an anniversary screening....

A presidential election cycle looms, but one of the men most associated with covering presidential politics since the first election of George W. Bush won't be sitting in his usual spot: Comedy Central confirmed on Tuesday that Jon Stewart is stepping down later this year from his post at The Daily Show . Stewart took over the show from original host Craig Kilborn in 1999, and under him, it became not just a popular comedy series, but a source of news and information for its audience, devoted...

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: The biggest film festival in North America is in full swing. The Toronto International Film Festival shows more than 300 films in just 10 days to hundreds of thousands of movie viewers and to lots of critics. Among those critics are NPR's pop-culture blogger Linda Holmes and our movie critic Bob Mondello. They join us from CBC studios in Toronto. Hello, Linda. Hi, Bob. LINDA HOLMES, BYLINE: Hello. BOB...

Transcript WADE GOODWYN, HOST: Twenty-five years ago, Lloyd Dobler raised a boombox over his head and changed the world of movie boyfriends forever. (SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "IN YOUR EYES") PETER GABRIEL: (Singing) All my instincts, they return... GOODWYN: Linda Holmes, of our pop culture blog "Monkey See," was a teenager when she first saw the film "Say Anything..." She says all these years later, she has a new appreciation of it. LINDA HOLMES, BYLINE: Lloyd Dobler is played by John Cusack. He's...

Stages Of Winter Rage

Mar 3, 2014

[The following is a purely speculative, hypothetical story of winter. It corresponds to no actual meteorological data.]
October 20: Eeeeeeee! Snow in the forecast! Eeeeeeee! October 21: I saw flakes! Here's an Instagram of flakes out my window! You can't really see them, but they're there, I promise! Flakes! November 3 : There are tiny bits of snow landing on my windshield, and it is the most charming thing I've ever seen in my life. Snow is the best. Snow is fairy dust for grown-ups....

Michael Sam, the SEC defensive player of the year out of Missouri, talked about being gay in an interview with The New York Times that ran Sunday, although his college coaches and teammates already knew. Sam was expected to be a solid NFL draft pick in May, making this a particularly intriguing time for him to come out. Assuming he's drafted, Sam would become the first active NFL athlete to be openly gay. (Let me say this: I am not, as a writer, a big fan of the phrase "openly gay," because...

Bob Mondello and I took a break from our time at the Toronto International Film Festival today for a chat withAll Things Consideredand host Audie Cornish. We filled her in on just how many movies we've both seen, the surplus of stories about doppelgangers, the adventures of Daniel Radcliffe, and what we think are the early awards contenders. You can catch up with my previous Toronto updates here and here , and I'm sure Bob and I will both have lots more to say upon our return. But if you want...

You may be familiar with the San Diego Comic-Con, a constantly expanding convention for fans that started as a niche event for comic-book nerds and is now a sprawling pop-culture event. You may not be familiar with Comikaze. The brainchild of Regina Carpinelli, a fan who was unhappy with the cost, ticket scarcity, and changing focus of Comic-Con, Comikaze is a smaller festival that costs $30 for the weekend, rather than Comic-Con's $150 four-day passes. On Tuesday's All Things Considered ,...

There are three phrases that are almost always bad news for a piece of cultural writing. They are: 1. "The masses." 2. "Middle America." 3. "The lowest common denominator." All three are ways to separate the writer and her sensibility — which are presumed to be congruent with the reader and her sensibility — from invisible and undefined others, for whom bad cultural content is produced and by whom it is unquestioningly gobbled up. For substantive comment on the quality or meaning of anything,...

Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: And this morning here in Los Angeles the nominations for the 85th Academy Awards were announced. The movie with the most nominations: Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln," with 12 nods. (SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "LINCOLN") DANIEL DAY-LEWIS: (as Lincoln) Euclid's first common notion is this: Things which are equal to the same thing are equal to each other. That's a rule of mathematical reasoning. It's true because it works. (SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "LIFE OF PI") SURAJ SHARMA: ...

COME RIGHT DOWN RIGHT NOW BUY SOME FURNITURE EVERYTHING MUST GO WE ARE LIQUIDATING MERCHANDISE FOR THE THIRD TIME SINCE LAST FEBRUARY AND THIS TIME WE REALLY MEAN IT WE ARE GOING OUT OF BUSINESS ANY REASONABLE OFFER WILL BE ACCEPTED OR MY NAME ISN'T CRAZYPANTS MCGILLICUDDY.* If this is what television commercials sound like to you, Congress has you covered. Beginning today, because of the "CALM Act" (it stands for Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation), by federal law and accompanying...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FD1K8OvVCs PBS Digital Studios started its "Icons Remixed" series with a charming Fred Rogers video that was hugely successful this summer, and followed it with "Happy Little Clouds" from Bob Ross and "Keep On Cooking" with Julia Child. Now, they're back with "In Your Imagination," a remixed Reading Rainbow video that not only highlights great little phrases that are both funny and profound (I will never get tired of Levar Burton saying "I love maps," I don't...

On Monday's Morning Edition , Hayden Planetarium director and pop-culture go-to science guy Neil deGrasse Tyson tells NPR's David Greene the story of how he came to lend a hand to Superman. DC Comics, Tyson explains, approached him for permission to use the Planetarium — as well as his likeness — in a story where Superman witnesses the destruction of Krypton, since the light from the distant planet is just now arriving on Earth. Tyson told DC Comics that he was happy to help, and that instead...

It's just about that time when members of the press begin to attend screenings of Les Miserables . I hereby vow to engage in none of the following conduct. 1. Throw crusts of bread at the screen and yell, "HEY, JEAN VALJEAN, ARE YOU HUNGRY?" 2. Do my imitation of Amanda Seyfried singing "There are so many questions and ah-nswers that somehow seem wrong," even though it's really funny and quite terrifying. 3. Refer to the short-haired Anne Hathaway as "Ruth Buzz-y." 4. Sing "I am the monarch...

Full disclosure: The first thing I said when I saw that Rob Delaney would be talking to NPR's Audie Cornish on today's All Things Considered was that I was curious to see whether he had ever said anything on Twitter — where he has almost 670,000 followers (including me) as of this writing — that they thought they could read on the radio. It's an exaggeration. But not by that much. Delaney's Twitter feed is a firehose of gross jokes, politics, non sequiturs, sharply observed satire, links to...

Tonight, two new fall shows premiere: Mob Doctor , which is about a doctor who works for the mob, and Revolution , which is about a devastating global power outage and — more than that — a revolution. Neither of these shows particularly requires your attention, but taken together, they emphasize that essentially, all you need to make a show is the right combination of title-friendly words. In fact, if you take the correct 25 words, you can combine them (often in either order!) to create all...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldqjM7x6NhE Being funny, unashamedly angry, and deeply human is something a large number of people try and a relatively small number of people do well. One of the people I've always thought did it well was David Rakoff, who has died so very much too young — at 47 — most likely as a result of the tumor he announced he was battling in 2010, though details haven't emerged. As he told Jon Stewart on The Daily Show , he learned he had this particular cancer while...