Linda Lockhart | St. Louis Public Radio

Linda Lockhart

Outreach Specialist

Outreach specialist Linda Lockhart has been telling stories for most of her life. A graduate of the University of Missouri's School of Journalism, she has worked at several newspapers around the Midwest, including the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, as a reporter, copy editor, make-up editor, night city editor, wire editor, Metro Section editor and editorial writer. She served the St. Louis Beacon as analyst for the Public Insight Network, a product of Minnesota Public Radio and American Public Media that helps connect journalists with news sources. She continues using the PIN to help inform the news content of St. Louis Public Radio. She is a St. Louis native and lives in Kirkwood.

Ways to Connect

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Linda Lockhart | St. Louis Public Radio

More than 500 people marched along West Florissant Avenue early Saturday afternoon. The racially diverse group included young and old, families, clergy members, all walking in solidarity past the burnt-out QuikTrip. The area around the convenience store that was destroyed by looters has become a focal point in the days following the shooting death of Michael Brown. Police cars from various jurisdictions followed the last of the marchers at the end, lights flashing. A St. Louis County police officer said this was to guard against other traffic running over the marchers.

/photo by Kathryn Banks

Emotions continue to run high as people throughout the greater St. Louis area try to process the fatal shooting by police of an unarmed young man.

Peaceful protests that followed the death of Michael Brown, 18, at the hands of a Ferguson police officer on Saturday turned to violence on Sunday. And the chaos continued early Wednesday, when a St. Louis County officer shot and critically injured a man authorities say pointed a gun at officers near a protest site.

(via Flickr/lowjumpingfrog)

What issues are most important to you, ahead of the Aug. 5 primary election? What might prompt you to vote for a particular candidate?

"St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh is preparing to interview the candidates who are running for St. Louis County executive, in the contested races in the Democratic and Republican primaries, and we invite you to share questions you would like Marsh ask the them.

/ Photo provided by Eileen Duggan

If you ever listened to you mother — really listened, you probably learned some very valuable lessons.

For Eileen Duggan, one of those lessons has served her well in her years as a piano teacher.

“She taught me the importance of establishing a studio policy, and treating the career as a business.” Duggan wrote, in response to questions through our Public Insight Network. Her mother, Frances Duggan, taught piano for 55 years. 

Missouri Archives

When young Joe Teasdale won the Missouri gubernatorial race against incumbent Christopher “Kit” Bond in 1976, few were more surprised than Teasdale himself. That fact became increasingly evident on that election night nearly 38 years ago, as a ballroom-full of supporters waited, and waited, and waited for their man to come down from his hotel suite above, and make his acceptance speech.

After learning of Teasdale's death Thursday at age 78, I had a flashback to a November night in 1976.

Linda Lockhart | St. Louis Public Radio

The Johnson’s Shut-ins State Park, Missouri’s original, natural water park, is ready for action. That’s what Steph Deidrick, a division information officer for the Missouri State Parks, wants people to know.

It’s been four years since Johnson’s Shut-ins reopened the park and campgrounds after the area was hit by a devastating flood, caused when AmerernUE’s Taum Sauk reservoir gave way.  The reservoir breach occurred on Dec. 14, 2005, sending approximately 1.3 billion gallons of water down the Proffit Mountain, flooding the park below.

Chesterfield and St. Louis
(Brent Jones | St. Louis Public Radio)

The St. Louis Bluesweek Festival and the Budweiser Taste of St. Louis are on the move, and people throughout the metro area have been quick to share their reactions.

Taste of St. Louis and Bluesweek left many regulars reeling after organizers announced that this year both will be held in Central Park and the Chesterfield amphitheater.

Provided by Mrs. Dempsey

Dorothy Dempsey turned her thoughts Sunday to Martin Luther King by attending Mass at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis as a member of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Knights of St. Peter Claver.

The local branch of this Catholic fraternal organization turns out each year to celebrate the life and legacy of the civil rights leader who was born on Jan. 15, 1929, and assassinated on April 4, 1968, when he was 39.

(via Flickr / DanielSTL, year added by St. Louis Public Radio)

With just one more day left in the year, we took the opportunity to reflect on the top St. Louis news stories of 2013. St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon's Editor Margaret Wolf Freivogel joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh in a discussion about the top regional news of the year with education reporter Tim Lloyd, political reporters Chris McDaniel and Jo Mannies, and statehouse bureau chief Amanda Vinicky of Illinois Public Radio.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - The people have spoken, and for the most part, they are not happy. For many Americans, the recent government shutdown was just one more reason for them to be dissatisfied.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: For this school year, students from two St. Louis-area districts are traveling far away from their homes. That's because their home districts — Normandy and Riverview Gardens — have lost their accreditation from the state of Missouri, and by law, any students who live within those districts are allowed to transfer to better performing districts.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The summer of 1963 was a pivotal time for race relations in the United States. On Aug. 28, in the nation’s capital, more than 200,000 people gathered in a unified call for racial equality. They listened to speeches. They sang songs. They prayed. Although President John F. Kennedy had summoned the National Guard as a security measure, the event was peaceful, as people, black and white, joined together in a call for change.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Under Missouri's school transfer law, students who live in unaccredited school districts may choose to attend a nearby, accredited district. The sending district must pay the students' tuition and must designate one district to which it will also pay transportation costs. 

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: "Hooray! And good riddance."

Those were the reactions Monday of Betty Nelson of Kirkwood, after hearing of the death of Osama bin Laden. Her son, David, was among those killed in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York.

As President Barack Obama prepares to announce the official end of U.S. combat in Iraq, several St. Louis area residents expressed concerns about the cost, in both lives and dollars, of the effort to bring democracy to that Middle East country.

During a 2010 interview, Norman Seay shared this photo of Jefferson Bank protesters being led to jail. A young William Clay, before he was elected to Congress, is second from left. Seay is the man wearing a hat and is behind the man with a pocket handkerc
Provided by Mr. Seay

When Norman Seay leads a gathering to this year's commemoration of the Jefferson Bank protest of 1963, he will be taking a stand one more time for civil rights, equality and justice.

Seay is one of St. Louis' most widely respected advocates for civil rights. He has spent most of his life trying to educate people -- blacks and whites -- about the importance of integration and equal opportunities for everyone.

Norman Seay lives in the family home on James "Cool Papa" Bell Avenue. The star baseball player was his uncle.

After you tell us what you know, tell us what you want to know.

That's how I often start a conversation with folks to explain the Beacon's Public Insight Network.

The PIN, as we call if for short, is a program the Beacon uses to find new sources who can help us tell stories with a better sense of relevance. Using email as our primary tool, we ask questions about topics we are covering and reporters then use the responses we receive to help tell a story.

Proposition C, which is on Missouri's Aug. 3 primary ballot, asks voters whether Missouri should be able to opt out of federal health-care reform, specifically the mandate for individuals to buy health insurance. The Beacon, through our Public Insight Network, asked readers how they are likely to vote on this measure. Here are excerpts from some of their responses. (Read the Beacon's companion article: With Prop C, Missouri voters will be first in nation to weigh in on health-care reform.)

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: I didn't grow up in Kirkwood. So that's the first strike against me. And I'm not white, so that's the second strike.

But even with two strikes against me, today, Kirkwood is my home. And for the most part, I love it.

I grew up in working-class neighborhoods in north St. Louis. My father was a special delivery driver for the Post Office, and my mother worked in clerical and secretarial jobs.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The people of Kirkwood came together Saturday night. On a springlike evening, a large crowd came to pay tribute to five men and one woman who died last year.

Kirkwood police officers William Biggs and Tom Ballman; Council members Connie Karr and Mike Lynch; and the city’s public works director Ken Yost died on Feb. 7, 2008, after they were shot by Charles “Cookie” Thornton. Thornton was well known inside City Hall and throughout Kirkwood as a businessman who tried to help others and as an annoyance who frequently disrupted the city’s business. He was killed by police who responded to a distress call from Biggs just after he had been shot.

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