Lindsay Toler | St. Louis Public Radio

Lindsay Toler

Engagement Producer

Lindsay Toler joined the St. Louis Public Radio as digital engagement producer in January 2018. A native of Dallas, Texas, Lindsay first moved to the Show-Me State to study at the University of Missouri, where she received Bachelor’s degrees in journalism and sociology and a certificate in multicultural studies.

Lindsay’s journalism career has taken her around the world. She reported on terrorism, fashion and politics for the Associated Press bureau in London. She covered gymnastics at the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games for the Olympic News Service and wrote about life in Beijing for The Dallas Morning News. She also worked for The Seattle Times and a weekly community newspaper in Washington state. She then joined the Peace Corps as a health education volunteer in Moldova, the poorest country in Europe.

Lindsay moved to St. Louis in October 2011, just as the St. Louis Cardinals were going up against her hometown in the World Series — and she’s been a Cardinals fan ever since. She covered south St. Louis County for Patch.com, wrote the news blog for the Riverfront Times and worked as St. Louis Magazine’s first-ever online staff writer.

As St. Louis Public Radio’s engagement specialist, Lindsay has her dream job: talking to public radio listeners about the news on social media. In her spare time, Lindsay enjoys kickboxing, reading tarot cards, and going to movies by herself. She lives in Tower Grove South with her partner Mike and schnoodlehuahua Persie. Reach out to Lindsay by email at ltoler@stlpublic radio, or send her a DM on Twitter at @StLouisLindsay.

Ways to Connect

Albert Kelly, former head of the EPA's Superfund Task Force, and EPA Region 7 administrator Cathy Stepp attend a town hall in Bridgeton about the West Lake Landfill Superfund site in October 2017
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

The head of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Superfund Task Force resigned Tuesday after one year in the role, leaving residents in northwest St. Louis County unsure about the fate of a proposal to clean up West Lake Landfill.

Albert Kelly, former EPA senior advisor, did not immediately return a call for comment. Media reports say the ex-banking executive resigned after relentless bad press about his financial dealings. Before he joined the EPA, Kelly helped administrator Scott Pruitt get financing to pay for a mortgage and to buy a minor league baseball team. Later, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. banned Kelly from the industry because of a previous banking violation.

Mitali Sharma, center, marches with Clayton High School classmates in downtown St. Louis.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

 

Thousands of people marched in downtown St. Louis on Saturday morning to protest gun violence and advocate for stricter gun control.

Saturday’s March for Our Lives event was a culmination of a month-long effort to honor the 17 people killed during the Feb. 14 school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Survivors of the shooting helped organize the rally in Washington, D.C., with sister marches occurring across the U.S. — including the one in St. Louis — and around the world.

 

As a light rain fell, demonstrators chanted and carried signs reading “enough is enough” and “make our schools safe again.”

Jeremy Meuser, 13, refects during the school walkout at Maplewood Richmond Heights.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

Students in St. Louis — and around the country — walked out of school Wednesday morning as part of a national call for improved school safety and tighter gun-control measures.

File Photo |Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Circuit Attorney’s indictment of Gov. Eric Greitens for one count of felony invasion of privacy raises lots of questions. St. Louis Public Radio asked our social media followers on Twitter and Facebook to send their questions to us.

Kristen Goodman performs her original song 'I’m Ready' for the NPR Tiny Desk Concert in January 2017.
Kristen Goodman via YouTube

Updated Feb. 21 with St. Louis on the Air conversation about contest starting  Tiny Desk Contest is now live! Use this entry form to enter, and tag your entry with #TinyDeskSTL so we can share it here in the St. Louis area. Good luck, Tiny Desk musicians.

Calling all St. Louis musicians: The 2018 Tiny Desk Contest from NPR Music officially begins Feb. 20.

You may submit a video of you or your band playing an original song behind a desk — any desk — and you could win a chance to play your own Tiny Desk Concert at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., before embarking on a nationwide tour. The winner will also appear at a taping of NPR’s "Ask Me Another." Submissions are due March 25.

The West Lake Landfill, in the distance, sits adjacent to the Bridgeton Landfill, right.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The Environmental Protection Agency proposal to partially remove nuclear weapons waste from a northwest St. Louis County landfill marks a major shift in approach to a problem that’s plagued residents for decades.

Since 1990, federal officials have either passed the buck on remediating West Lake Landfill or proposed building a cap over the site, which does little to prevent the tons of radioactive waste from contaminating groundwater.

On Thursday, EPA head Scott Pruitt announced his “Excavation Plus” proposal to remove much of the waste, which is about 600 feet from an underground fire in the adjacent Bridgeton Landfill, and permanently cover the rest.

Here's a guide to our coverage.

The West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton, seen from St. Charles Rock Road.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 3 p.m. to clarify how much waste would be removed and with additional reaction  — The Environmental Protection Agency has decided on a partial removal of World War II-era radioactive waste at the West Lake Landfill, in northwest St. Louis County.

The EPA proposed a remedy that would remove “the majority of the radioactive material” and construct a cover system to “best protect the community of Bridgeton over the long term,” the agency said today in a news release.

Facebook launched News Feed 11 years ago so users could see friends’ posts without having to visit their profiles. Today, News Feed is the unofficial homepage of the internet with billions of viewers each month.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed how users will experience new changes on Facebook and how media organizations such as St. Louis Public Radio and NPR are dealing with the changes.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 8, 2011 - Bob Fox's story typifies the up-by-your-bootstraps mentality of the American Dream: His Yiddish-speaking grandparents immigrated to America from Poland. His father grew into a successful businessman with only a 10th-grade education.

Now, Fox lives to "pay it forward" by providing the new wave of Hispanic immigrants with culturally sensitive health care at Casa de Salud, Spanish for "house of health."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 7, 2011 - The first foreign language Amanda Clark ever heard was glossolalia, the religious practice of speaking in tongues.

There's a lot more to this story, but that is the only detail Clark can share. She's preparing to tell the story in front of a room full of strangers on Thursday.