Margaret Wolf Freivogel

Editor

Margaret Wolf Freivogel is the editor of St. Louis Public Radio. She was the founding editor of the St. Louis Beacon, a nonprofit news organization, from 2008 to 2013. A St. Louis native, Margie previously worked for 34 years at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch as a reporter, Washington correspondent and assistant managing editor. She has received numerous awards for reporting as well as a lifetime achievement award from the St. Louis Press Club and the Missouri Medal of Honor from the University of Missouri School of Journalism. She is a past board member of the Investigative News Network and a past president of Journalism and Women Symposium. Margie graduated from Kirkwood High School and Stanford University. She is married to William H. Freivogel. They have four grown children and seven grandchildren. Margie enjoys rowing and is a fan of chamber music.

Ways To Connect

Rexsinquefield.org

The latest chapter of Power Players – Jason Rosenbaum's periodic watchdog report on political fundraising in Missouri – shows that Democrats topped Republicans in collecting big donations in 2013. But Rex Sinquefield was the state's most prolific donor. Again.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

Two topics dominated St. Louisans' news this week -- unusual cold and snow returned to our region and Missouri legislators returned to Jefferson City.

It would be snarky to ask which poses the greater threat to public welfare. Yet as the bad weather rolled out and the legislators rolled in, I couldn't help but notice certain parallels in the way we think about these natural and political phenomena.

gurney
(via Wikimedia Commons/Noahudlis)

Missouri's new execution drug continues to spark controversy -- or, to be more precise, several controversies. The death penalty raises ethical, legal and practical questions. And this situation raises another overarching issue as well -- government secrecy.

children studying
laura00 | sxc.hu

Students are counting the days until winter break, but there's no break in sight in the controversies over school quality and student transfers.

In recent days, education reporters Tim Lloyd and Dale Singer took the lead in covering developments for the newly combined news operations of St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon. Their work was a good example of how we can serve you better together.

Margaret Wolf Freivogel
Beacon File Photo

Monday, St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon merged. This milestone marks the end of more than a year of effort. But in a sense, we've just broken ground for the news organization we intend to build.

Its foundation is constructed from solid principles. We believe that facts matter. We believe that fairness matters. We believe that if we pay attention to facts and fairness, then our work will matter to you and the future of our region.

A picture might be worth a thousand words, but the sound of a voice can sometimes tell you even more.

Two recent Beacon slideshows included audio of conversations with longtime small-town residents recalling the history of their communities. In both cases, the unhomogenized twang of the speakers transported me instantly to a different place and time, conveying as much about the subject at hand as the words and images.

We’re doubly excited about the Beacon’s recently announced plan to add a Washington correspondent.

The reporter will add breadth and depth to the Beacon’s already strong coverage of issues and politics that affect our region. And he or she will appear as well on St. Louis Public Radio in a new partnership. The Beacon’s goal is to reach people where they are in ways they find most useful and convenient, and this arrangement will help us deliver.

At the Beacon, we cover news that matters to people in the St. Louis region. But people are interested in more than what happens here. What happens in Iraq, for example, hits home whether we like it or not.

While on vacation, I read an interesting New York Times story about five neuroscientists who took a wilderness trip. They wanted to see how immersion in nature might affect their digitally overloaded brains.

The latest news from the investigation of sudden acceleration crashes indicates that something is amiss -- but not necessarily with Toyotas.

While the federal safety investigation continues, it might be time to consider what the episode demonstrates about another important institution -- not the auto industry but the media. As the Beacon's editor and a longtime journalist, I find the matter perversely instructive.

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