Margaret Wolf Freivogel

Editor

Margaret Wolf Freivogel is the editor of St. Louis Public Radio. She was the founding editor of the St. Louis Beacon, a nonprofit news organization, from 2008 to 2013. A St. Louis native, Margie previously worked for 34 years at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch as a reporter, Washington correspondent and assistant managing editor. She has received numerous awards for reporting as well as a lifetime achievement award from the St. Louis Press Club and the Missouri Medal of Honor from the University of Missouri School of Journalism. She is a past board member of the Investigative News Network and a past president of Journalism and Women Symposium. Margie graduated from Kirkwood High School and Stanford University. She is married to William H. Freivogel. They have four grown children and seven grandchildren. Margie enjoys rowing and is a fan of chamber music.

Ways to Connect

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites --

As a cool breeze chased away the heat, St. Louisans marked the turning of the seasons in two ways this week. The Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah, opened 10 days of reflection and repentence for some. Labor Day brought the end of summer for all.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites -

In 1963, the Washington Post deployed some 60 staffers to cover the March on Washington. In the deluge of ink the next day, the words "I have a dream" appeared only once, in the fifth paragraph of a roundup on Page A15. That monumental lapse of news judgment drew regrets this week from Post associate editor Robert Kaiser, who covered the march as an intern. His column came to my attention through Don Marsh, who exercises impeccable news judgment as host of St. Louis On the Air.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites -

Last month, I worried that the school transfer issue could evolve into a perfect storm of our region's most emotional and intractable problems. Urban-exurban resentments, timid leadership, educational inequality and race -- all potentially feed the mix.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites -

What do Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, Boston Red Sox owner John W. Henry and the Beacon have in common? Here are some answers in the form of a Beacon B List:

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites -

The case of Pfc. Bradley Manning brought to light the usual arguments over the public's right to know and the government's need to keep secrets. Manning was convicted on most counts this week but acquitted on the most serious charge, aiding the enemy.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites --

Three controversies roiled the feelings of St. Louisans this week -- the George Zimmerman verdict in Florida, student transfers in local districts and construction of housing for the elderly poor in Oakville. In each case, the chasms that separated different points of view were so wide that many people could only shout across them.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites -

You may not work in downtown St. Louis. You probably don't go there to shop. But as the Fourth of July festivities once again demonstrated, downtown remains our region's heart, geographically and emotionally. We all have a stake in its health.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites --

News that the Normandy school district will bus students to Francis Howell schools raised a storm of controversy this week. Unless cool heads prevail, it could evolve into a perfect storm -- an ugly convergence of our region's most emotional and intractable problems.

What problems?

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites --

News that hits home with St. Louisans often happens far from home. Proving that point, St. Louisans took great interest this week in the U.S. Supreme Court's rulings on gay marriage, the voting rights act and affirmative action. Similarly, immigration legislation and President Obama's climate control initiative carried distinct local implications.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites -

Sometimes, how you say something seems to matter as much as what you say.

Three disparate examples from the Beacon this week prove the point -- Harper Barnes' tribute to Duff's, Jason Rosenbaum's video about video and Rob Koenig's coverage of the coverage of Sen. Claire McCaskill.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites --

As the Beacon grows, so do people's expectations of us. This is good. We hold ourselves to the highest journalistic standards, and we're glad you expect no less.

But inevitably, we make choices that disappoint some people. Why didn't you cover this, they ask? Why did you miss that angle? This week, complaints arose on several fronts.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites --

The regular symphony season has ended, but the Shakespeare Festival, Spring to Dance, Bluesweek and Opera Theatre are just beginning. This week, the Beacon reported on these and more pieces of St. Louis' cultural richness.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites -

National controversies in the news this week showed that Americans, much as we may disagree over politics, still share two fundamental principles.

First, government officials should not use their power for personal or partisan gain.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites -

Here's the back story on Back Stories, a blog that will kick off in the Beacon soon with a post from reporter Mary Delach Leonard. Through frequent updates, Beacon staff will use Back Stories to share some questions they're asking and some answers they're finding.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Dear Beaconites –

Funny what sticks in your mind. This week, to celebrate the Beacon's fifth birthday, General Manager Nicole Hollway asked staff members to recall their five favorite things from the Beacon's first five years.

A picture might be worth a thousand words, but the sound of a voice can sometimes tell you even more.

Two recent Beacon slideshows included audio of conversations with longtime small-town residents recalling the history of their communities. In both cases, the unhomogenized twang of the speakers transported me instantly to a different place and time, conveying as much about the subject at hand as the words and images.

We’re doubly excited about the Beacon’s recently announced plan to add a Washington correspondent.

The reporter will add breadth and depth to the Beacon’s already strong coverage of issues and politics that affect our region. And he or she will appear as well on St. Louis Public Radio in a new partnership. The Beacon’s goal is to reach people where they are in ways they find most useful and convenient, and this arrangement will help us deliver.

At the Beacon, we cover news that matters to people in the St. Louis region. But people are interested in more than what happens here. What happens in Iraq, for example, hits home whether we like it or not.

While on vacation, I read an interesting New York Times story about five neuroscientists who took a wilderness trip. They wanted to see how immersion in nature might affect their digitally overloaded brains.

The latest news from the investigation of sudden acceleration crashes indicates that something is amiss -- but not necessarily with Toyotas.

While the federal safety investigation continues, it might be time to consider what the episode demonstrates about another important institution -- not the auto industry but the media. As the Beacon's editor and a longtime journalist, I find the matter perversely instructive.

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