Margaret Wolf Freivogel

Editor

Margaret Wolf Freivogel is the editor of St. Louis Public Radio. She was the founding editor of the St. Louis Beacon, a nonprofit news organization, from 2008 to 2013. A St. Louis native, Margie previously worked for 34 years at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch as a reporter, Washington correspondent and assistant managing editor. She has received numerous awards for reporting as well as a lifetime achievement award from the St. Louis Press Club and the Missouri Medal of Honor from the University of Missouri School of Journalism. She is a past board member of the Investigative News Network and a past president of Journalism and Women Symposium. Margie graduated from Kirkwood High School and Stanford University. She is married to William H. Freivogel. They have four grown children and seven grandchildren. Margie enjoys rowing and is a fan of chamber music.

Ways To Connect

Ferguson Farmers Market

What will we learn from a week that will weigh heavy on the hearts of St. Louisans for years to come? These tumultuous days have changed the way we see each other and the way the world sees us.

The fury that unfolded after a police officer killed Michael Brown in Ferguson laid bare some of our area's underlying fault lines. It raised questions we usually leave buried. And it presented to the world an image of our region that those of us who live here didn’t always recognize and might rather not see.

at the polls
Rachel Heidenry | File photo | St. Louis Beacon

Whether or not you like the results of Tuesday’s election, you might find some bright spots in what it revealed about voters.

At least in St. Louis County, voters showed up in higher than expected numbers. Across the state, voters proved resistant to the influence of money. And voters even found some common ground across the rural-urban divide that often immobilizes the state.

Of course, turnout for the primary was far from stellar – about 25 percent overall. But in St. Louis County nearly 30 percent showed up – substantially more than the 20 percent predicted.

Rachel Heidenry | File photo | St. Louis Beacon

Next Tuesday, Missouri voters will write the ending to a summer season of political melodrama. Will you vote?

(courtesy of Uber)

"I caution people all the time that when you're dealing with public policy not to be completely driven by logic."—Taxi commission chairman Louis Hamilton

That burst of candor, reported by St. Louis Public Radio’s Rachel Lippmann, helped to illuminate what was really going on this week as the commission grappled with questions that will determine whether Uber and Lyft operate here.

Michel Martin
Doby Photography / NPR

With changes underway in programming on St. Louis Public Radio and in NPR’s national news operation, you may be wondering who decides what and why. Even if you’re an NPR junkie, you may not know how it all works.

I certainly didn’t before making the transition from avid listener to St. Louis Public Radio staff member seven months ago. Here are three important organizational facts I’ve learned. They may seem arcane, but over time they shape the content you hear.

Flickr/mrsdkrebs

We celebrate America’s birth on July 4. But 238 years after the Declaration of Independence, our democracy, like any living thing, still needs care and feeding. Part of that responsibility falls to journalists, and this Editor's Weekly often focuses on our role. But there’s more to the news ecosystem than professional journalists.

For the Sake of All

The grant-funded project that St. Louis Public Radio recently announced is ambitious.

It’s big — more than $170,000 from the Missouri Foundation for Health for our news organization and the University of Missouri-St. Louis. And it addresses a big question — how to reach people whose voices and views are often left out of public policy discussions that directly affect them.

St. Louis Media Archives

Gloria Ross’s obituary for radio icon Lou “Fatha” Thimes took me way, way back. Back to the hiss of static on an AM radio in a green Studebaker. Back to a time when the 1950s TV icons were Ozzie and Harriett  rather than Don Draper. Back to a grade school classroom where the African-American kids had only recently won the legal right to be present.

Mehlville website

Some of St. Louis Public Radio’s best work this week wasn’t breaking news. It was making sense of news that broke days or even months earlier.

It’s been a year since the court ruling that opened the door to student transfers from Normandy and Riverview Gardens to Francis Howell, Mehlville, Kirkwood and other districts. Reporter Dale Singer circled back this week to ask key participants to reflect on their hopes, fears and actual experiences.

file photo

Forty two years ago this week, St. Louis Public Radio began broadcasting from its home at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Coincidentally, those of us from the St. Louis Beacon, which merged with the station six months ago, are about to complete probation and become full-fledged UMSL employees.

Pages