Mary Delach Leonard

Work/Life Reporter

Mary Delach Leonard is a veteran journalist who joined the St. Louis Beacon staff in April 2008 after a 17-year career at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, where she was a reporter and an editor in the features section. Her work has been cited for awards by such organizations as the Missouri Associated Press Managing Editors, the Missouri Press Association and the Illinois Press Association. In 2010, the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis honored her with a Spirit of Justice Award in recognition of her work on the housing crisis. Leonard began her newspaper career at the Belleville News-Democrat (in Illinois) after earning a degree in mass communications from Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville, where she now serves as an adjunct faculty member. She is partial to pomeranians and Cardinals.

Ways To Connect

Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

Ring ... Ring ... This is a very important message about your current credit card accounts. This is your second and final notice to lower your credit card interest rate and payments. Press 1 now to find out the terms, conditions and associated changes before the next billing cycle. Again, this is your final notice as it relates to the financial stimulus. So press 1 now to take advantage of this today ...

Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon

At The Griot Museum of Black History, the storytelling doesn’t depend on a designated month. February is usually an important month for the organization, but the lessons are taught whenever a person or group comes in.

The little two-story brick museum in north St. Louis celebrates the accomplishments of African Americans and their connections to the region. It also presents how slaves were transported.

Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon

The little bowling alley at the Jefferson Barracks VA Medical Center is a lively place on Thursday afternoons when patients from the spinal cord injury unit are bowling and shooting the bull with local veterans who volunteer at the lanes.

On these six wooden lanes -- amid the victorious clatter of strikes and the thud, thud, thud of gutter balls -- men and women with life-altering injuries find cheerful encouragement while learning how to use adaptive bowling equipment to knock down the tenpins.

Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon

A new display in the atrium of the Jewish Federation Kopolow Building may be small in size, but it packs punch with its disturbing news clippings and artifacts detailing the response of the St. Louis Jewish community to extremism and discrimination of all types after World War II.

At left, Craig Remsburg sits with his son Cory during the State of the Union address along with a photo of the Army Ranger during rehab with President Obama.
Enhanced White House stream of State of the Union Address

Dear Sgt. 1st Class Cory Remsburg:

St. Louis says, “Hi.”

With tweets and Facebook posts and all manner of website shout-outs, St. Louisans have been sending well wishes to Sgt. Remsburg, the Army Ranger who was lauded for his determination and courage by President Barack Obama during Tuesday’s State of the Union address.

Provided by Roni Chambers

Roni Chambers, who led the now-shuttered GO! Network, is practicing what she used to preach to white-collar professionals who turned to her nonprofit for help after they lost their jobs during the Great Recession.

White House photo

As St. Louisans gather Monday to celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Christ Church Cathedral is inviting the community to join a day-long reading of his speeches and letters from the ornate pulpit where he delivered a Lenten sermon 50 years ago.

This is the fifth year that Christ Church has held the community reading but the first time that participants will stand in the pulpit where King stood, said the Very Rev. Mike Kinman, dean of the cathedral, who believes in the power of “everyone’s voices.”

Courtesy Susan Grigsby

Local children’s authors, who explore topics ranging from Thomas Jefferson to tattletales, will be on hand to discuss and sign their books at two sessions this month at the St. Louis Central Library.

unshoveled walk
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon

Despite a persistent myth that seems to surface every time it snows, homeowners don’t increase their liability in "slip and fall" cases because they cleared the snow and ice from their sidewalks, say local attorneys.

Snow and ice are considered a normal hazard of living -- and clearing off your sidewalk is the right thing to do, said Stephen Ringkamp of the Hullverson Law Firm.

Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio and The Beacon

The year ended as it began for Hazelwood city leaders who in 2011 backed a British startup that plans to build energy-efficient delivery vans: They’re still waiting for Emerald Automotive to find about $160 million in private funds.

David Cox, Hazelwood’s economic director, said he remains optimistic that the project will eventually happen. Hazelwood has loaned Emerald $3 million, and the Missouri Technology Corporation kicked in another $2 million.

house leaning against dollar
sxc.hu

U.S. households have come a long way in regaining wealth lost in the Great Recession, but the pace of recovery remains uneven largely due to the housing market, say researchers from the St. Louis Federal Reserve.

Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio and The Beacon

Residents of a tiny village in Missouri’s Bootheel hope this will be the last Christmas they spend waiting for a federal buyout of their homes that were destroyed in May 2011 when the Army Corps of Engineers blew up a levee to alleviate flooding along the Mississippi River.

Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio and The Beacon

Knock, knock. Knock, knock. Campus Kitchen!

With each knock on a door, St. Louis University students Shannon Leahy and Max Clifton were completing a chain of good deeds by dozens of volunteers with Campus Kitchen at St. Louis University. Every week, the students collect and organize, slice and dice, sauté, cook, bake and assemble donated fruits, vegetables, breads and meats into free nutritious meals for their elderly and disabled neighbors who live in high-rises just across Grand Boulevard.

Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon

Wanda Pierson was 500 miles from home on a wintry December morning waiting to visit her son who was undergoing treatment in the spinal cord injury unit at the Jefferson Barracks VA Medical Center.

Capt. Steve Mossotti of the Mehlville Fire Department
Mary Delach Leonard | 2010 St. Louis Beacon photo

St. Louis veterans joined with area residents Saturday morning to honor and remember the victims and heroes of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks during a reflective walk and patriotic ceremony at Jefferson Barracks Park.

The Federal Reserve reported economic growth at a "modest pace" in its five western districts since mid-July, including St. Louis, Minneapolis, Kansas City, Dallas and San Francisco, according to the Fed's Beige Book released Wednesday.

The Fed said that reports from all 12 districts suggested continued growth in national economic activity, but noted mixed conditions or "a deceleration" compared with previous periods in Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, Richmond and Atlanta.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Since his election in 2005, Granite City Mayor Ed Hagnauer has helped steer his community of about 30,000 through some trying times.

In July 2006, severe storms battered Granite City, downing trees and power lines and leaving hundreds of residents without electricity for a week. An ice storm the following November again left many in the community in the dark. But no one was injured or killed, and the city worked with Granite City Township officials to set up emergency generators in cooling and heating shelters.

U.S. Steel in Granite City
Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Beacon | File photo

Dan Simmons, president of Local 1899 of the United Steelworkers, said he never forgets his own mantra -- to buy American-made products -- even when it turns out to be a real challenge.

Simmons said that he and a fellow union official spent hours scouring the warehouse of a St. Louis candy wholesaler recently searching for union-made -- or even American-made -- candy to toss to kids at Monday's annual Labor Day parade in Granite City.

"We had to really work at it," Simmons said. "We spent way longer than we should have to make sure it was American-made."

Granite City used TIF funds to build a new movie theater.
Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Beacon | File photo

There is a glowing sign of changing times in downtown Granite City: a stylish marquee on a just-completed state-of-the-art cinema, within eyeshot of an old landmark steel mill that's up and running again.

Granite City used $4.6 million in tax-increment financing funds to pay for the theater, in hopes that it will draw people downtown.

If current political advertising is a sign of the finger-pointing to come, it appears that some candidates -- most notably the non-incumbents -- are taking a page from Bill Clinton's now infamous campaign dogma about the importance of the ailing economy, but with a twist.

With all due respect, it's the bailout, stupid.

Does the figure $700 billion come to mind?

Pages