Nora Ibrahim

News Intern

Ways To Connect

Bradley Schlaggar


Most people have heard about the undesirable side effects that chemotherapy has on the body of people suffering from cancer. There's balding, fatigue and loss of appetite, to name a few.

Until recently, however, chemotherapy’s effects on the brain weren’t widely recognized. The cognitive side effects – a  fuzzy memory and poor attention span – were usually dismissed by physicians, scientists and even some cancer patients.

The symptoms have a name: Post-chemotherapy cognitive impairment, or “chemobrain,” among those who suffer from it.

Nora Ibrahim

Veterans, families and other citizens commemorated fallen soldiers and loved ones who served in war Monday at the Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay was among the elected officials who gathered for the 55th annual ceremony at the cemetery, which is the fifth largest under the Department of Veterans Affairs. Slay said Memorial Day marks one of the most important days of every summer.

This diagram is an excerpt of “figure 1” from Ameren’s “Detailed Site Investigation,” showing the location of the company’s proposed coal ash landfill.
Ameren Missouri

Environmental groups delivered about 3,500 petitions to Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon’s office in Jefferson City on Thursday, asking him to stop a construction permit for a coal ash landfill in Franklin County. The permit would allow Ameren Missouri to build a new landfill near its power plant located by the Missouri River.

Ameren says it’s almost of out of room in existing storage ponds for the coal ash, so it wants to build a newer and safer facility. In a released statement, it says it is committed to building a state-of-the-art landfill for its customers.

Nora Ibrahim

On the 159th anniversary of Mary Meachum's attempted crossing of the Mississippi River — from what was at the time the slave state of Missouri to the free state Illinois — St. Louis residents, local groups and officials gathered at the crossing site to announce plans for a permanent monument. For many of those who attended, it marks 15 years of hard work to get the site more widely recognized. 

Flickr/Jeremy Noble

As St. Louisans participated in National Bike to Work Day recently, a local group reflected on its efforts to make the region more bike-friendly.

Great Rivers Greenway has released a report, grading St. Louis’ progress on a region-wide bike plan. The Gateway Bike Plan would build bike routes connecting parks, universities and major public areas throughout St. Louis City, St. Louis County and St. Charles County. Other initiatives under the plan would implement policies and training programs to support bikers.

Nora Ibrahim

Vice President Joe Biden made a short stop at the Gateway Arch grounds on Tuesday, praising the Arch improvements as a prime example of successful partnerships.

Last year, St. Louis voters approved a 3/16th of one-cent sales tax hike to be used alongside federal and state grants as well as private donations to pay for improvements to the Arch grounds. The total cost of the renovation of the Arch grounds is expected to be about $380 million, with about $250 million coming from private sources. The current schedule has it on pace to be completed in 2016.

Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Ellisville Mayor Adam Paul is no stranger to fighting city hall.

At this point last year, Paul was clawing his way back into office after a high-profile – and at-times bizarre – impeachment saga. Despite an intense and expensive effort from his political adversaries to remove him, Paul eventually kept his job as mayor. His town has generally been out of the headlines ever since.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio

Two Change of Command ceremonies commemorated new leadership at Scott Air Force Base on Monday.

Gen. Paul Selva now leads U.S. Transportation Command at Scott after Gen. William Fraser’s retirement. Gen. Darren McDew replaces Selva as head of Air Mobility Command.

(Washington University Students Against Peabody)

Seven students at Washington University in St. Louis were arrested Friday after attempting to enter an administration building on the Danforth campus where a board of trustees meeting was being held. The students were among a group of 100 protestors rallying against the school’s connection to Peabody Energy.

Caroline Burney, a Washington University senior, said the protestors were trying to deliver a letter of resignation to Peabody's chief executive officer Greg Boyce, who is also a university trustee.

(Tim Lloyd)

St. Louis will once again have its own professional soccer team.

Many green- and white-clad soccer fans celebrated the exciting news at the St. Louis Scott Gallagher soccer club facilities, where the club and United Soccer Leagues (USL) made the announcement Thursday.

Nora Ibrahim

Baseball and business were both on the agenda when the China National Baseball Team visited St. Louis on Friday. Mayor Francis Slay and former U.S. Sen. Christopher "Kit" Bond were among those who met with the team at Ballpark Village overlooking the field at Busch Stadium.

St. Louis-based Rawlings, a sports equipment manufacturer, arranged for the Chinese team’s visit in the past few months as it finalized a contract with the team. The company announced last month that it will be the China National Baseball Team’s official apparel and equipment sponsor.

Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Nicholas Curry's sleeping arrangement has changed a bit over the last couple of days.

Curry, a junior at Washington University, has been camping out in a tent near Brookings Hall. It's part of a "sit-in" to get Washington University to cut ties with Peabody Energy, a large coal company that's headquartered in St. Louis. 

"I slept out here with my dog Max," Curry said. "So, we spent the night here last night, and we'll be here tonight."

(Flickr/The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

The Mississippi River, one of the hallmarks of American landscape, is no longer the expansive, grand river it once was. Decades of constructing levees, dams and other systems for managing floods have whittled it down to a series of pools, dramatically altering its ecosystem. 

James and Brea McAnally in the work in progress at the new Luminary Center for the Arts.
Nora Ibrahim | St. Louis Public Radio Intern

In the heart of Cherokee Street, 2701 to be exact, The Luminary's new building is rapidly transforming.

The art gallery, incubator and performance venue (formerly the Luminary Center for the Arts) is moving from Reber Place into a 17,000 square-foot space that takes three different properties and melds the historic with the modern.

In only two weeks, a stage, office spaces and wall frames were erected. Over the next two weeks, the construction crew will install drywall and paint. And while its new location undergoes swift changes, The Luminary itself is rebranding.

Students from Sperreng Middle School in the Lindbergh School District will advance to the National Science Bowl after winning the Missouri regional competition Saturday.

The National Science Bowl brings together thousands of high school and middle school students to compete in answering fast-paced questions in physics, math, biology and more. Team coach Julie Roy said this will be the second year Sperreng is heading to nationals in the two years Missouri has opened its regional competition for middle school students.

Joseph Leahy | St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon

Thousands walked above the icy Mississippi River Saturday as governors, senators and U.S. representatives from Illinois and Missouri cut the ribbon on the new Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge.

The $230 million, cable-stayed structure is the culmination of a decades-long effort to relieve congestion on the nearby Poplar Street and Martin Luther King Bridges.