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5:56 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Programs Target Poverty In Obama's 5 'Promise Zones'

People line up at the FamilySource Center in Los Angeles, an organization in one of President Obama's five designated "Promise Zones" that aims to help fight poverty in the area.
Priska Neely NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 10:02 am

Five areas across the country have been designated as "Promise Zones" by the federal government. These zones, announced by President Obama in January, are intended to tackle poverty by focusing on individual urban neighborhoods and rural areas.

In the five Promise Zones — located in Philadelphia, San Antonio, southeastern Kentucky, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and Los Angeles — the idea is to basically carpet-bomb the neighborhoods with programs like after-school classes, GED courses and job training to turn those areas around.

What Happens In The Zone?

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Movie Interviews
4:18 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

The Life And Death Of 'The Internet's Own Boy'

Aaron Swartz was heavily involved in the popular 2012 campaign to prevent the passage of the federal Stop Online Piracy Act, or SOPA.
Quinn Norton Falco Ink Publicity

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 7:48 am

Aaron Swartz was a programmer, a hacker, a freedom of information activist — and a casualty of suicide.

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Author Interviews
4:14 pm
Sat July 5, 2014

Release Of 'Echo's Bones' Resurrects Beckett's Rejected Work

Playwright and writer Samuel Beckett, shown here around 1970, wrote Echo's Bones at his editor's request — only to have it cut from his first collection.
Reg Lancaster Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 6:14 pm

Playwright and author Samuel Beckett, who died 25 years ago, wrote lasting works of literature like Waiting for Godot and Endgame. But a previously unpublished short story of his — now being released for the first time — was not so appreciated.

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Author Interviews
10:47 am
Sat July 5, 2014

A Noodle-Maker's Daughter Falls For Ballroom Dancing In 'Mambo'

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 12:08 pm

Transcript

TAMARA KEITH, HOST:

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Technology
4:35 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Why 140 Characters, When One Will Do? Tracing The Emoji Evolution

NPR

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 6:01 pm

You may have heard that 250 more emojis, the little smiley face icons and other symbols you can send in text messages, are coming to a cellphone near you.

The story of the emoji starts in Japan in the mid-1990s. Back then, pagers were all the rage with teenagers.

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Business
5:45 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

For Tipped Workers, A Different Minimum Wage Battle

States may have their own higher wage laws, but the federal minimum wage for tipped workers is $2.13 an hour.
AP

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:14 am

The federal minimum wage for tipped workers has been $2.13 since 1991. That pay rate tends to get lost in the larger debate over whether to raise the national minimum wage for nontipped workers, which is $7.25 an hour.

In theory, the money from tips should make up the difference in pay — and then some. But according to a White House report, tipped workers are more than twice as likely as other workers to experience poverty.

Living On Tips

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Movie Interviews
5:11 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

Behind Optimus Prime (And Eeyore), One Man's Signature Voice

Voice actor Peter Cullen arrives at the premiere of Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen in June 2009.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:20 am

Transformers: Age of Extinction has smashed its way to the No. 1 spot at the box office. Director Michael Bay's film franchise has consistently topped charts since the first film arrived in theaters in 2007.

The live-action films have embraced the latest in visual affects — but the movies have also called back to the series' past, through the voice of Peter Cullen.

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Code Switch
5:22 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

'Everything I Never Told You' Exposed In Biracial Family's Loss

Everything I Never Told You is Celeste Ng's debut novel about a Chinese-American family living in 1970s Ohio. She is currently working on a second novel and a collection of short stories.
Kevin Day The Penguin Press

It's May, 1977, in small-town Ohio, and the Lee family is sitting down at breakfast. James is Chinese-American and Marilyn is white, and they have three children — two girls and a boy. But on this day, their middle child Lydia, who is also their favorite, is nowhere to be found.

That's how Celeste Ng's new novel, Everything I Never Told You, begins.

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All Tech Considered
4:26 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

Modern Video Games Go Beyond 'Jumping On Blocks'

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 11:35 am

The video game BioShock Infinite received widespread praise for having a rich narrative packed with philosophy when it debuted last year. The game sold millions of copies.

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Men In America
5:14 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

The New American Man Doesn't Look Like His Father

While life has changed significantly for American men in the past half-century, notions of masculinity remain tied to those that may have been passed down from this father to the son on his shoulders.
Evans/Three Lions Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 10:36 am

This summer, All Things Considered is exploring what it means to be a man in America today. In some ways, the picture for men has changed dramatically over the past 50 years. More women than men are going to college, and the economy is moving away from jobs that traditionally favored men, like manufacturing and mining. Attitudes have also changed on the social front, with young men having more egalitarian attitudes toward women and expectations of being involved fathers.

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