Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Rachel Lippmann

Reporter

Lippmann returned to her native St. Louis after spending two years covering state government in Lansing, Michigan. She earned her undergraduate degree from Northwestern University and followed (though not directly) in Maria Altman's footsteps in Springfield, also earning her graduate degree in public affairs reporting. She's also done reporting stints in Detroit, Michigan and Austin, Texas. Rachel likes to fill her free time with good books, good friends, good food, and good baseball.

Ways to Connect

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

South County Republican state Senator Jim Lembke says the opinion issued last week by attorney general Chris Koster still doesn't convince him that some municipal ordinances authorizing red light cameras are legal.

Lembke, who's introduced legislation again this year that would ban the use of the cameras, says he agrees that local governments are allowed to put up the cameras.

(US Census Bureau)

In 2009, the news from the U.S. Census Bureau was all good for the city of St. Louis.

The American Community Survey showed the city's population had 356,587 people - up about two percent from the 2000 official count. And Mayor Francis Slay would challenge numbers that didn't confirm the notion that his city was growing.

The long legal battle over the release of files from a St. Louis police investigation into officers who misused 2006 World Series tickets they seized from a scalper has gotten a little longer.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

On Wednesday, students at the City Academy, a private school in north St. Louis, will have a chance to view a civil rights documentary shot and edited by their schoolmates.

(via Flickr/ Giles Douglas)

More not-so-great economic news for the St. Louis region today.

The Home Builders Association of St. Louis and Eastern Missouri released its data on the number of permits issued by the six counties (St. Louis, St. Charles, Lincoln, Warren and Franklin) and the city of St. Louis. They show that builders were looking to start construction on just 120 new single-family homes in January 2011. That's down more than 40 percent from January 2010, and is the lowest monthly total since November of 2008.

A day after a measure granting St. Louis control of its police department cleared the latest of several legislative hurdles, a broad coalition of politicians, business and community leaders and civil rights activists pledged to help it get through the Missouri Senate.

The message they'll bring? You have to listen to the people.

_J_D_R_ / Flickr

The costs of goods and services in the St. Louis region rose 2.5 percent between the last six months of 2009 and the last six months of 2010 - more than double the national rate over that same time.

Though the Bureau of Labor Statistics data show electricity prices going up 13.1 percent and motor fuel going up 10.1 percent, bureau economist Jacqueline Michael Midkiff says they weren't the real drivers of the increase.

(Institute for Justice)

The constitutionality of St. Louis city's sign ordinance was the topic of debate today in front of a three-judge panel of the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

In December, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch wrote that money collected via tax bills for a planned new animal shelter in the city of St. Louis was sitting in a special fund with no place to be used.

(St. Louis Board of Aldermen)

  • A member of a long-time political family in St. Louis is leaving his post as alderman for the 11th Ward. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Ald. Matt Villa says he needs to focus on expanding the family's business, Villa Lighting.

Proposition B asks to voters to allow their local city or county to continue collecting sales tax on cars bought out of state
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

Two current members of the St. Louis city Board of Elections say recent reports of turmoil at the board have nothing to do with Gov. Jay Nixon's announcement today that he's named three new members of the board.

A small piece of an $8.1 billion plan to redevelop north St. Louis took another step forward today.

Updated 3:29 p.m. Feb. 10, 2011:

Prosecuting Attorney Robert P. McCulloch announced today that Martin had lethal levels of both oxycodone and cocaine in her blood when she died, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports. He said that neither Martin nor Busch had a prescription for the oxycodone.

The Missouri Athletic Club has received the first citation for violating St. Louis city's ban on smoking.

Interim health director Pamela Rice Walker says the club mistakenly believes it's exempt from the measure as a private club, saying the exemption only applies if there are no employees.

She says the department first heard about violations at the club in January, and gave the MAC 30 days to comply.

(Rachel Lippmann, St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster has unveiled the legislative changes he says will strengthen the state's domestic violence laws.

The 12 recommendations are the result of a task force Koster convened last year, and seven of them will require action by the General Assembly.

Most of the legislative proposals focus on strengthening orders of protection, which Koster calls the main tools to help domestic violence victims. He says current law doesn't allow juveniles to request those orders.

Boeing announced today that they're moving into production at their new site in Mascoutah, Ill., the St. Louis Business Journal reports.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The John Cochran Veterans Affairs Medical Center has canceled all surgeries until further notice after discovering that some surgical equipment may not have been properly sterilized.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

  • St. Louis police have identified the woman killed yesterday when she was struck by a Metro bus. Rosalind D. Smith, 60, was hit after getting off the bus at the Forest Park station, located at Forest Park Pkwy and DeBaliviere Ave. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch says witnesses told police Smith appeared to bend down, but they aren’t sure if she fell.

comedy nose | Flickr

It's been an above-average winter for snowfall in St. Louis, and that's wreaking havoc with the schedules for area school districts.

By state law, Missouri students have to be in class for at least 174 days and 1,044 hours. Most districts build a few extra classroom days into the schedule in order to be able to call school in case of bad weather.

"The Rite of Spring" and "Firebird" by Igor Stravinsky, a performance with the Hubbard Street Dance Company,  Johann Sebastian Bach's Mass in B Minor, and a gala concert with violinist Itzahk Perlman are among the highlights of the St. Louis Symphony's 2011-2012 season.

Updated at 5:30 pm with further remarks from St. Louis Democrats chair Brian Wahby

The Democratic National Committee has announced its choice city for the 2012 Democratic National Convention -- and it's not St. Louis.

Charlotte, N.C. has been named the host of the event over St. Louis and other finalist cities Cleveland and Minneapolis.

Dealing with the aftermath of this winter storm? We have information and resources to help.

Also, if you have some photos of your winter storm experience to share, post them here.

Follow other news and weather-related updates with us on Twitter: @stlpublicradio

(CityArchRiver 2015)

The $578 million plan to overhaul the grounds of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial (better known as the Arch) now has oversight in place.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated 4:20 p.m. to correct math error in amount of demolition and remediation.

Developer Paul McKee's plan to revitalize North St. Louis is taking a few small steps forward.

Alderwoman April Ford-Griffin will officially introduce legislation tomorrow  authorizing Northside Regeneration LLC, McKee's company, to start work on about $3 million of projects in the two-square mile site.

Are public incentives likes TIFs and TDDs worth it? An updated report by the East-West Gateway Council of Governments says probably not.

There’s been a temporary delay in a new skirmish between the city and its fire department.

Ald. Matt Villa has held a bill that aims to change the way certain benefits for firefighters are funded.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Read Gov. Jay Nixon's proposed budget for fiscal year 2012 closely, and you'll see a set of numbers that can give you pause.

The City of St. Louis has issued new rules for residents of the area's unofficial homeless encampments.

Residents will not be allowed to drink or use drugs, or engage in criminal activity. And they will also have to cooperate with police, fire and the city health department.

St. Louis Department of Human Services director Bill Siedhoff says he doesn't expect enforcement to be a problem:

(via Flickr/steakpinball)

The first of the four men sentenced in connection with the scandal at St. Louis Metropolitan Towing has reported to prison.

Kenneth Bialczak and his older brother William pleaded guilty in September 2010 to tax evasion. They owned several of the businesses connected to the scandal, including Metropolitan Towing and S&H Parking.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The city's Downtown Economic Stimulus Authority has restarted the clock on the construction of Ballpark Village.

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