Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Rachel Lippmann

Justice Reporter

Rachel Lippmann covers courts, public safety and city politics for St. Louis Public Radio. (She jokingly refers to them as the “nothing ever happens beats.”) She joined the NPR affiliate in her hometown in 2008, after spending two years in Lansing covering the Michigan Capitol and various other state political shenanigans for NPR affiliates there. Though she’s a native St. Louisan, part of her heart definitely remains in the Mitten. (And no, she’s not going to tell you where she went to high school.)

Rachel has an undergraduate degree from the Medill School of Journalism, and a master’s in public affairs reporting from the University of Illinois at Springfield. When she’s not busy pursuing the latest scoop, you can find her mentoring her Big Brothers Big Sisters match, hitting the running and biking paths in south St. Louis, catching the latest sporting event on TV, playing with every dog she possibly can, or spending time with the great friends she’s met in more than nine years in this city.

Rachel’s on Twitter @rlippmann. Even with 240 characters, spellings are still phonetic.

Ways to Connect

The subject of jobs and how to create them was front and center at the sixth annual State of St. Louis breakfast this morning.

The chief executives of St. Louis City, St. Louis County, St. Charles County and St. Clair County Illinois all say they expect a better economy in 2011 than 2010.

They all trumpeted the need to cooperate to ensure that happens.

St. Clair County executive Mark Kern wants to see the focus on one industry in particular.

Update 10:35am with additional details about the hazard and possible reopening time.

Technicians from General Electric are at the scene at SSM Imaging to help the Mehlville Fire Department vent helium gas from an MRI machine at the medical office.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch says the venting should take about 15 minutes, and emergency officials hope to reopen a closed stretch of Lindbergh Blvd by noon today.

St. Louis Public Library
File photo | Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

On time, and on budget.

Those are the five words St. Louis Public Library executive director Waller McGuire is most excited to say about the $70 million renovation of the library's headquarters building.

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

The Belleville News-Democrat is reporting that the union representing East St. Louis police has rejected a deal that would have trimmed salaries to save 16 jobs.

St. Louis-based Monsanto Co. says higher sales of corn, soybean, vegetable and cotton seeds helped the company earn a profit in the first quarter of the fiscal year.

(All photos by Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The last time they congregated outside like this, the temperatures were in the teens, the wind was howling, and there were four inches of snow on the ground. And they were scared for their lives.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 8:36pm with response from John Cochran officials.

The troubled John Cochran veteran's hospital is under fire again, this time for allegedly failing to keep critical supplies stocked on a timely basis.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The sanctuary at St. Francis Xavier Church on the Saint Louis University campus was filled today with people who had gathered for one purpose - to remember the life of Max Starkloff.

Such a crowd, said former Washington University chancellor William Danforth, would have been unheard of in 1959, when an automobile accident left Starkloff a paraplegic and living in a nursing home at the age of 21.

(Passport photo via Maplewood Police Dept.)

Maplewood police say they still have no leads on a St. Louis Community College student from Mongolia who went missing four days before Christmas.

File photo

It was a safer year for motorists traveling on Missouri roads during the New Year's holiday this year.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol announced today that it has reports of just one fatality on the roads between 6 p.m. on New Year's Eve until 11:59 yesterday. Troopers investigated 157 accidents, which also resulted in 70 injuries, and arrested 90 people who were driving drunk.

Chuck Berry
Bill Greenblatt | UPI | file photo

  • A funeral is scheduled for Thursday for a soldier from Ste. Genevieve who died in Afghanistan. 25 year-old Sgt. Michael J. Beckerman was assigned to the 101st Airborne at Fort Campbell in Kentucky. The army says he died Dec. 31 in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, of wound suffered when insurgents attacked his unit with an improvsed explosive device. Beckerman arrived at Fort Campbell in January 2010. He joined the Army in September 2004.

(Bill Greenblatt/UPI)

Former Missouri Gov. Matt Blunt has forgiven a loan he made to the man who wants the job he once held.

(via Flickr/AComment)

If you purchased a Show Me Cash lotto ticket at Metropolitan Newstands downtown yesterday, check your numbers - you could be $775,000 richer.

(Flickr/connor395)

A fourth man - the suspected shooter - has been arrested in connection with the death of a St. Louis-area native who had a spot on the Ram's practice squad this season.

The Metropolitan Sewer District says it plans to appeal a July court ruling that threw out a new system for charging for stormwater system maintenance.

The new fee charged people based on how much of their property could not absorb water. But Lincoln County judge Dan Dildine ruled that it was actually a tax, and therefore had to be approved by voters.

Missouri’s K-12  schools could face even tougher funding hurdles this year thanks to the slumping gaming industry.

A document provided to the Associated Press today shows Missouri’s 12 casinos were projected to generate about $372 million. That was based on the assumption that removing loss limits would generate more revenue.

(screenshot from Google Maps)

A northeast Missouri clay mine faces criminal charges over violations of the state's Clean Water Law.

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources says the Joe Gilliam Mining Company hasn't had a permit to operate the mine since July 2009. Before its previous permit expired, mine owners didn't submit required annual reports and fees.

Max Starkloff with his daughter, Emily
File photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Funeral services for disability rights pioneer Max Starkloff have been set.

(Rachel Lippmann, St. Louis Public Radio)

Crews working on the new Mississippi River Bridge have gotten the $640 million project back on track.

Flooding meant that for the months of May, June, and July, it wasn't safe for crews to be working below the water line, says project manager Greg Horn. That wiped out 81 construction days.

/Via Flickr/ KOMU news, Manu Bhandari

Some major road projects will keep the Missouri Department of Transportation and its contractors busy next year. But that all changes in 2012.

In 2011, crews will complete a new ramp connecting Interstate 270 and Page Avenue, says Bill Schnell, MoDOT's assistant district engineer in the St. Louis area. They'll also finish MoDOT's portion of the Route 141 extension in West County.

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