Shula Neuman

Executive Editor

Shula Neuman has more than a decade of journalism experience as both a print and radio reporter.  Shula came to St. Louis Public Radio in late 2013 after working as an editor for NPR in Washington, D.C.  She has also reported on economic development for Cleveland’s public radio station and, before that, worked as a reporter at the Watertown Daily Times and was a reporter and evening newscaster at St. Louis Public Radio.  Yes, this is Shula’s second stint with St. Louis Public Radio. She says she just can’t stay away from her hometown because she’s tired of rooting for the Cardinals in absentia.  Shula has a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University; an Executive M.B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis; and a bachelor’s from Reed College in Portland, OR. She claims she has no intention of going back to school again.  Shula is an avid cyclist, canine enthusiast, and compulsive baker (although she has yet to bake anything for dogs).

Ways to Connect

Paul Sableman via flicker

You hear it nearly every time you watch a crime show. As the bad guy is getting cuffed by the police, they tell him that he has the right to remain silent. And "Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law." And they tell him he has the right to an attorney. If he cannot afford to hire a lawyer, "one will be appointed to represent you..."

As with most things you see on TV, it's not actually that easy. In this episode of We Live Here, we explore the price and perils of our public defender system.

Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

On this episode of We Live Here we introduce you to four police officers who discuss not only what life is like during the day-to-day grind of work, but also the question of whether or not race makes a difference for African-American officers in majority white police departments.

The reason we are presenting the police perspective to you is that we feel it's a point of view that hasn't received enough attention. And that's not just our idea.

Protesters in Ferguson in August 2014
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Public Radio has won six Edward R. Murrow  2015 regional awards. The honor recognizes St. Louis Public Radio's overall efforts for both digital and radio reporting excellence. This year, awards were granted in ten categories.

Most of the awards recognize the reporting on Michael Brown's death in Aug. 2014 and the protests and unrest that followed. That reporting reflected the efforts of everyone in the newsroom, including St. Louis on the Air, our daily talk show.

Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

We Live Here spent the last several weeks ramping up to explore race in St. Louis and, specifically, how systems intersect with people to create  a lot of the inequality in our region ... and around the country.

Now, we are moving from the general to the specific. We will spend the next several months exploring the criminal justice system.

From bottom left: St. Louis area residents Bala Anant, Will Johnson, Derrick Hopgood and his daughter Skylyn. Anne Cody, Lisa Heimberger and Brandy Bold.
Photo of Gateway Arch from Francisco Diez | Flickr, additional photos from Joseph Leahy and Kaitlyn Petrin / St. Louis Public Radio

Subscribe to We Live Here on iTunes and SoundCloud

Let’s be honest, talking about race can be tough — even nerve-racking for some.  

Often the conversation comes with trap doors leading to potentially awkward moments. It’s that fear of a misstep, perhaps, that nudges people into sidestepping clear language about race.

Clockwise from top left, Sister Rose Ann Ficker, Marie Kelly, Chris Kehr and Benjamin T. Allen Sr.
St. Louis Public Radio staff

St. Louis County has 90 municipalities.

It’s a fact we’ve heard casually thrown into news stories over the past few months, with little explanation as to how St. Louis County came to be a hodge-podge of towns. In this episode of We Live Here, we talk to Esley Hamilton, a preservationist for St. Louis County Parks, who explains why there are so many municipalities in the region.

Within this system of municipalities, people are largely divided — white, black, rich and poor. They rarely live next to each other.

We live here.

Those are the words that we found ourselves saying in the months after Michael Brown was fatally shot last August by then-police officer Darren Wilson.

Those are also the words we've chosen as the name for an effort we're beginning today. It’s a multi-faceted, multi-media project that we hope will shed some light on the very tangible racial issues that seemed to be at the heart of the unrest and protests that swept our region — and eventually the rest of the country — during the last few months of 2014.

Janice Barrier (left) and her wife Sheri Schild were one of the 10 couples who sued the state to have their marriage recognize in Missouri.
Rachel Lippmann I St. Louis Public Radio

A Kansas City judge ruled Friday that the state of Missouri had to recognize marriages of same-sex couples that were legally married in other states.

Pilot Roy Caton checks his balloon for security before taking off on a flight.
Shula Neuman/St. Louis Public Radio

On the third weekend of September, St. Louisans turn their gaze skyward in the hopes of glimpsing a charming sight: dozens of multi-colored hot air balloons floating across a clear blue sky. It’s the Great Forest Park Balloon Race, a 42-year-old tradition in St. Louis that has been kept alive thanks to the friendship and generosity of four men.

Gateway Cup

Cyclists from across the country gather in St. Louis this weekend for the 29th annual Gateway Cup cycling races. The popular, four-day event takes place in four St. Louis neighborhoods – Lafayette Square, Benton Park, The Hill and St. Louis Hills – and attracts anywhere from 5,000 to 10,000 fans per day.

The Gateway Cup has long been an attraction for top-level cyclists. But this year the race gained additional prestige because it has been added to the U.S.A. Cycling National Criterium Calendar (NCC), the premier series of 20 professional criterium races.

(via Flickr/Jennifer Boriss)

On Tuesday, two federal appeals courts issued conflicting decisions that could have major ramifications for the future of the Affordable Care Act.

The controversy hinges on whether people in the 36 states that opted NOT to set up their own health insurance exchanges can qualify for subsidies (really, tax credits) on their health insurance premiums. Missouri and Illinois are among those 36 that don't have state-run exchanges.

e-MagineArt.com | Flickr

Drugs, privacy, prison. Those three things are linked to the debate over prescription drug databases -- and Missouri is the only state in the U.S. without one.

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

Police stopped more than a million drivers in Missouri in 2013, statistics released Friday show, with African Americans still more likely to be pulled over than whites.

The Missouri Attorney General's office released the annual Vehicle Stops Report (VSR) Friday. In a statement, Attorney General Chris Koster said that the disproportionate number of stops of African American is less than ideal, but should serve as a way to start talking about how to remediate the trend.

(Wake Forest University)

If there’s one thing I hate to do as a writer is repeat myself. I don’t like to say the same thing over and over again.

But sometimes, stories are so compelling and just don’t seem to die. So, I find that I have to retread familiar ground just a little bit.

This time, it’s women in corporate America.

Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose

For those who have forgotten our high school French, that handy phrase translates to: "The more things change, the more they stay the same."

(Flickr/Philip Leara)

It’s Tuesday, that magical day of the week when our thoughts turn to questions of economics, business, innovation, technology … and related topics that tickle our fancy but we haven’t been able to report on ourselves. It’s the day we say, “Don’t think we haven’t been paying attention, dear reader,” and we share some the things we’ve been reading on topics of interest. 

(David Cappaert, Michigan State University)

Beware the Emerald Ash Borer. 

Ash trees in the St. Louis area are susceptible to attacks from the Emerald Ash Borer, an invasive species of beetle that has been creeping toward the area since 2008.

The green beetle, with a penchant for any kind of ash tree, has infested and killed millions of trees nationwide. The beetle is native of Asia and was first found in Michigan in the early 2000s, although recent research suggests the bug could have been here since the early 1990s.

(Shula Neuman, St. Louis Public Radio)

Train enthusiasts and history buffs gathered at the re-opening of Union Station yesterday in downtown St. Louis. The newly rehabbed train station and hotel kicked off its inaugural weekend by celebrating National Train Day.

(Courtesy; University of Chicago)

It’s Tuesday, the day when we poke our heads out of the offices of St. Louis Public Radio and review some of the other stories brewing in the economy that have piqued our interest.

First up is news that a very important economist has left this earth. Nobel Laureate Gary Becker died on Saturday. He is most notable for his economic theories that tried to explain human behavior, tackling questions that went way beyond supply and demand. The University of Chicago professor studied things like crime, racial discrimination and even romance.

(Flickr/Paul Sableman)

Last week, the calendar turned from April to May, bringing with it plenty of budding leaves, flowers and allergies.  

But it’s not just pollen in the air that could be causing your eyes to burn and your throat to itch. The American Lung Association also came out with its annual State of the Air 2014 report and the findings do not reflect well on the St. Louis area.

The city of St. Louis and St. Louis County received the following grades:

(Flickr/Alfredo Mendez)

A maroon car with a pink mustache drove past me this weekend when I was out walking the dog. It was not a car trying to make a fashion statement. It was one of the new Lyft drivers who put the distinctive pink mustache on her car’s grille as an indicator that she is open for business.

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