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St. Louis Public Radio

Protesters chant outside Busch Stadium during a Cardinals game on Sept. 29.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

On Sept. 15, St. Louis Circuit Judge Timothy Wilson ruled that former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley was not guilty of first-degree murder in the 2011 shooting death of 24-year-old Anthony Lamar Smith.

Elvert Barnes Protest Photography | Flickr

Updated Aug. 25 with "St. Louis on the Air" audio — An excerpt of a conversation with Dick Gregory from Jan. 2003.

Original story from Aug. 20:

As Dick Gregory’s brother tells it, the comedian and civil rights activist “just saw things that was wrong and decided ‘I was going to do whatever I could and right them.’”

It was that determination, Ron Gregory told St. Louis Public Radio in an interview Sunday, that pushed his brother beyond St. Louis’ confines and onto the national stage.

Kali takes a swim at the Saint Louis Zoo.
File photo | Véronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

The fate of a sales tax hike to support the Saint Louis Zoo will be in voters’ hands, as Gov. Eric Greitens signed a bill into law Monday.

A worker adjusts a lift after the removal of the top piece of the Confederate Memorial in Forest Park last week. (June 8, 2017)
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 6:35 p.m. to correct headline — The Missouri Civil War Museum may sue St. Louis if the city challenges the museum’s ownership of the Confederate Memorial in Forest Park, the organization said Friday.

 Expanding on the success of St. Louis Public Radio | 90.7 KWMU and Quincy Public Radio | WQUB 90.3, the University of Missouri–St. Louis will assume the operational and programming duties of Missouri S&T’s public radio station KMST 88.5 FM in Rolla, Missouri effective July 1, 2017.

St. Louis Public Radio | 90.7 KWMU and PRX announce the third season of the awarding-winning podcast We Live Here, highlighted by a relaunch party Wednesday, June 21, 2017 from 7-9 p.m.

Former FBI Director James Comey
FBI

St. Louis Public Radio will carry special NPR coverage of former FBI Director James Comey’s testimony before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Thursday, June 8, 2017, starting at 9:00 a.m.

Comey will be questioned about his conversations with President Donald Trump and the FBI's investigation of possible Trump campaign connections to Russia. NPR News will provide live anchored coverage of the Senate hearing hosted by NPR's Lynn Neary. She will be joined in studio by the following NPR reporting team:

Starting June 1, Missouri residents who want to vote will need to show a photo ID or do one of two other things — sign a statement and show approved types of documents (for registered voters only) or vote a provisional ballot. 

Missouri isn't the first state to enact voter ID law like this — several states, including North Carolina and Texas, have it, too. But such laws haven't been without controversy.

What questions do you have about the new photo ID law? Ask Curious Louis and a St. Louis Public Radio reporter may follow up on your question. 

Republican state Reps. Jay Barnes, center, and Justin Alferman, right, converse with Alex Curchin, left, during the last day of the Missouri General Assembly's 2017 legislative session.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

It may have seemed like a mad-dash finish for Missouri’s Republican-majority legislative body, pushing dozens of bills to Gov. Eric Greitens’ desk before the end of the 2017 regular session.

But St. Louis Public Radio veteran political reporter Jo Mannies, who has covered Missouri politics for 40 years, said the end of the session wasn’t that unusual, when compared to previous ones — with a few notable exceptions. Among those exceptions was the lack of debate on issues that are generally popular with social conservatives, including gun rights and abortion restrictions.

Documenting Hate logo
Provided / ProPublica

St. Louis Public Radio is partnering with ProPublica and other newsrooms across the country to track hate crimes and bias-motivated incidents throughout the region — and we need your help.

Have you been the victim of a hate crime or harassment based on your race, ethnicity, gender, religion, disability or sexual orientation? Or, have you been a witness?

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens
File photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Gov. Eric Greitens, who has called for ethics reforms, faces a fine from the Missouri Ethics Commission for failing to report that his gubernatorial campaign received a donor list from a charity he founded.

St. Louis Public Radio | 90.7 KWMU and Quincy Public Radio | 90.3 WQUB will be making the following program changes effective Monday, May 1, 2017.

 

The downtown headquarters building for the St. Louis Public Schools
File photo | Dale Singer | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis’ Metro Academic and Classical High School is again among the nation’s 500 best in making its students ready for college.

U.S. News and World Report issued its annual rankings Tuesday, looking at more than 22,000 public high schools in the country, based on math and reading test scores, graduation rates and college preparedness.

RTDNA

St. Louis Public Radio is the recipient of three 2017 Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards from the Radio Television Digital News Association. The Awards, which recognize excellence in radio production for large market stations in Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, and Missouri, were given out in the following categories:  

An illustration of pills.
Illustration by Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri will receive $10 million in federal grant money to help combat a growing opioid painkiller crisis, U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt announced Wednesday.

It comes as the Missouri General Assembly is attempting to set up the nation's last prescription drug monitoring program, though the measures have hit several roadblocks.

Four St. Louis police officers were charged Thursday after an internal affairs investigation accused them of forging documents to collect thousands of dollars in overtime pay for work they did not perform.

Officers Brian Jost, Michael Langsdorf and Emin Talic face felony stealing and forgery charges, according to a release by the police department.  Officer Daniel O'Brien is charged with felony forgery and misdemeanor stealing.

School Illustration
Illustration by Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

School districts across the St. Louis region sought more money from taxpayers in Tuesday’s election. Also, there were three seats up for grabs for the St. Louis Public Schools’ elected school board., though the state still has oversight.

Here’s the breakdown of what passed and what didn’t:

Vacant buildings owned by the Land Reutilization Authority in the 4000 block of Evans Avenue. February 2017.
File photo | Marie Schwarz | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis won't receive more money to take care of city-owned vacant buildings, and won't sync its election dates with statewide elections.

Proposition NS, which needed two-thirds approval, received 58.57 percent of the vote.

The proposition would have given the city the ability to sell up to $40 million in bonds to go toward stabilizing the more than 3,5000 vacant buildings it owns. That money is equivalent to a one-cent property tax increase per $100 of a property’s assessed value.

St. Louis Metro Police officers use bicycles to push back protesters at an anti-Trump rally in downtown St. Louis in November 2016.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis will keep its Recorder of Deeds office, voters decided Tuesday. That means the city’s police department will have to find another way to help purchase for body cameras.

The measure, which moves the Recorder of Deeds office’s duties to the city assessor, would have needed to pass with 60 percent or more of the vote because it is considered a “county office.” It received 51.58 percent of the vote.

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