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St. Louis Public Radio

A worker adjusts a lift after the removal of the top piece of the Confederate Memorial in Forest Park last week. (June 8, 2017)
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 6:35 p.m. to correct headline — The Missouri Civil War Museum may sue St. Louis if the city challenges the museum’s ownership of the Confederate Memorial in Forest Park, the organization said Friday.

 Expanding on the success of St. Louis Public Radio | 90.7 KWMU and Quincy Public Radio | WQUB 90.3, the University of Missouri–St. Louis will assume the operational and programming duties of Missouri S&T’s public radio station KMST 88.5 FM in Rolla, Missouri effective July 1, 2017.

St. Louis Public Radio | 90.7 KWMU and PRX announce the third season of the awarding-winning podcast We Live Here, highlighted by a relaunch party Wednesday, June 21, 2017 from 7-9 p.m.

Former FBI Director James Comey
FBI

St. Louis Public Radio will carry special NPR coverage of former FBI Director James Comey’s testimony before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Thursday, June 8, 2017, starting at 9:00 a.m.

Comey will be questioned about his conversations with President Donald Trump and the FBI's investigation of possible Trump campaign connections to Russia. NPR News will provide live anchored coverage of the Senate hearing hosted by NPR's Lynn Neary. She will be joined in studio by the following NPR reporting team:

Starting June 1, Missouri residents who want to vote will need to show a photo ID or do one of two other things — sign a statement and show approved types of documents (for registered voters only) or vote a provisional ballot. 

Missouri isn't the first state to enact voter ID law like this — several states, including North Carolina and Texas, have it, too. But such laws haven't been without controversy.

What questions do you have about the new photo ID law? Ask Curious Louis and a St. Louis Public Radio reporter may follow up on your question. 

Republican state Reps. Jay Barnes, center, and Justin Alferman converse with Rep. Shawn Rhoads during the last day of the Missouri General Assembly's legislative session.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

It may have seemed like a mad-dash finish for Missouri’s Republican-majority legislative body, pushing dozens of bills to Gov. Eric Greitens’ desk before the end of the 2017 regular session.

But St. Louis Public Radio veteran political reporter Jo Mannies, who has covered Missouri politics for 40 years, said the end of the session wasn’t that unusual, when compared to previous ones — with a few notable exceptions. Among those exceptions was the lack of debate on issues that are generally popular with social conservatives, including gun rights and abortion restrictions.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is congratulated by legislators after delivering his first State of the State speech to the Missouri Legislature in the State Capitol in Jefferson City.
File photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Gov. Eric Greitens, who has called for ethics reforms, faces a fine from the Missouri Ethics Commission for failing to report that his gubernatorial campaign received a donor list from a charity he founded.

St. Louis Public Radio | 90.7 KWMU and Quincy Public Radio | 90.3 WQUB will be making the following program changes effective Monday, May 1, 2017.

 

The downtown headquarters building for the St. Louis Public Schools
File photo | Dale Singer | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis’ Metro Academic and Classical High School is again among the nation’s 500 best in making its students ready for college.

U.S. News and World Report issued its annual rankings Tuesday, looking at more than 22,000 public high schools in the country, based on math and reading test scores, graduation rates and college preparedness.

RTDNA

St. Louis Public Radio is the recipient of three 2017 Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards from the Radio Television Digital News Association. The Awards, which recognize excellence in radio production for large market stations in Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, and Missouri, were given out in the following categories:  

St. Louis-based Express Scripts has announced a new initiative to combat opioid abuse. June 7, 2017
Illustration by Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri will receive $10 million in federal grant money to help combat a growing opioid painkiller crisis, U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt announced Wednesday.

It comes as the Missouri General Assembly is attempting to set up the nation's last prescription drug monitoring program, though the measures have hit several roadblocks.

Four St. Louis police officers were charged Thursday after an internal affairs investigation accused them of forging documents to collect thousands of dollars in overtime pay for work they did not perform.

Officers Brian Jost, Michael Langsdorf and Emin Talic face felony stealing and forgery charges, according to a release by the police department.  Officer Daniel O'Brien is charged with felony forgery and misdemeanor stealing.

School Illustration
Illustration by Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

School districts across the St. Louis region sought more money from taxpayers in Tuesday’s election. Also, there were three seats up for grabs for the St. Louis Public Schools’ elected school board., though the state still has oversight.

Here’s the breakdown of what passed and what didn’t:

Vacant buildings owned by the Land Reutilization Authority in the 4000 block of Evans Avenue. February 2017.
File Photo | Marie Schwarz | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis won't receive more money to take care of city-owned vacant buildings, and won't sync its election dates with statewide elections.

Proposition NS, which needed two-thirds approval, received 58.57 percent of the vote.

The proposition would have given the city the ability to sell up to $40 million in bonds to go toward stabilizing the more than 3,5000 vacant buildings it owns. That money is equivalent to a one-cent property tax increase per $100 of a property’s assessed value.

St. Louis Metro Police officers use bicycles to push back protesters at an anti-Trump rally in downtown St. Louis in November 2016.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis will keep its Recorder of Deeds office, voters decided Tuesday. That means the city’s police department will have to find another way to help purchase for body cameras.

The measure, which moves the Recorder of Deeds office’s duties to the city assessor, would have needed to pass with 60 percent or more of the vote because it is considered a “county office.” It received 51.58 percent of the vote.

Reny Alfonso, 7, carries American flag pinwheels at the "Forward Together" bus tour kickoff event outside the Missouri History Museum Sunday afternoon.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Public Radio has three reporters and a photographer on Washington University’s campus to document and report on what's happening before the second presidential debate of 2016 between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

Read below for reverse chronological updates from throughout the day on Washington University's campus. You can also stay up-to-the-minute updated by following our Twitter list, embedded below but also available here.

U.S. Lacy Clay raises the arm of Kim Gardner in victory at the Exodus Gallery after the primary election. Gardner made history as the first African-American to hold the office of circuit attorney. Behind her is Alderman Jeffrey Boyd, and to the right is s
Wiley Price | St. Louis American

For the first time, an African-American will be the top prosecutor in the city of St. Louis. And in St. Louis County, County Executive Steve Stenger has lost a well-known ally on the County Council, after a big upset in the District 4 Democratic primary.

 Eric Greitens, Republican, left, and Chris Koster, Democrat
Jason Rosenbaum and Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Eric Greitens has emerged victorious from a bruising, four-way contest to be the Republican nominee for governor. He will face Attorney General Chris Koster, 51, who coasted to win the Democratic primary.

Provided | RTDNA

St. Louis Public Radio Radio has received a national Edward R. Murrow Award for its website, STLPublicRadio.org, in the large market radio category. The award was announced today by the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA). 

Stephanie Karr uses a pen to edit a stack of Ferguson City Council press releases detailing its amendments to the DOJ's proposed consent decree.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio | file photo

Ferguson's city attorney has resigned from her post.

Stephanie Karr sent her letter of resignation to the city on Monday. She had served as Ferguson's city attorney since 2004 — and until recently was also the city's prosecutor.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay.
File photo by Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

This is a developing story and will be updated. Mayor Francis Slay is not seeking a fifth term in office.

The longest-serving mayor in the city's history made the announcement Friday at a hastily called press conference at City Hall. He was first sworn in in 2001.

"I will not be a candidate for mayor next year," Slay said. As recently as March 28, he had indicated he would be seeking another term, and said as much on our Politically Speaking podcast.

St. Louis Public Radio | 90.7 KWMU announced today that Shula Neuman has been named executive editor.  Neuman, who served as interim editor since the retirement of Margaret Freivogel in January of 2016, joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2013 as the editor of the organization’s health, science, education and race beats. This is Neuman’s second stint with St. Louis Public Radio.

Illustration by Brent Jones | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Public Radio newsroom’s coverage of the Arch’s 50th anniversary is now in one easy spot for you to explore: The Arch at 50

Join us as we look back at how the Arch became the symbol for our region, ahead at a revamped park — and to the next 50 years.

Nixon at a press conference in August
Bill Greenblatt / UPI

This is where you can follow St. Louis Public Radio reporters' tweets, comments and observations of the governor's State of the State speech. Governor Nixon is expected to begin speaking at 7 p.m., which is when we'll start things rolling here, too.

Listen live with us at 90.7 FM or online.

Rick Stream, left, and Steve Stenger
Parth Shah | St. Louis Public Radio intern

This is where you can find the latest updates from the St. Louis Public Radio debate between St. Louis County executive candidates Steve Stenger, a Democrat, and Rick Stream, a Republican. The debate is being broadcast live on St. Louis On The Air from noon to 1 p.m. Tuesday and rebroadcast Tuesday night at 10 p.m.

>> Live updates for mobile users

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

This is where you can find the latest updates from our newsroom and reliable community sources on developments related to the events surrounding Ferguson and following the shooting death of an 18-year-old man in Berkeley by a police officer. 

Live Updates (better version for mobile users):

St. Louis Public Radio

Join us here as we live blog from our event Thursday evening, Ferguson and Beyond: A Community Conversation. The event will be from 6-8 p.m. at Wellspring Church in Ferguson, Mo.

NPR's Michel Martin will host and moderate the event.

A recording of the evening will be broadcast on Friday, August 29 at noon on our air and will be archived.

2007 NPR by Stephen V

Join St. Louis Public Radio and community leaders for a conversation about race, law enforcement and more.

WHO: A panel of local community leaders:

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