St. Louis Public Radio | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Public Radio

Join us here as we live blog from our event Thursday evening, Ferguson and Beyond: A Community Conversation. The event will be from 6-8 p.m. at Wellspring Church in Ferguson, Mo.

NPR's Michel Martin will host and moderate the event.

A recording of the evening will be broadcast on Friday, August 29 at noon on our air and will be archived.

2007 NPR by Stephen V

Join St. Louis Public Radio and community leaders for a conversation about race, law enforcement and more.

WHO: A panel of local community leaders:

voxefxtm | Flickr

Welcome to our one-stop place for all Aug. 5 election updates. Follow along with us and share what you're seeing. 

Resources for you:

(Kelsey Proud/St. Louis Public Radio)

What makes you stay in the St. Louis area? 

Is it the Cardinals? Your family? A great set of friends? The architecture? A job you love? A job you need to keep?

Whatever the reason, share it with others.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has refused to halt the execution of white supremacist serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin, calling his crime in Missouri a "cowardly and calculated shooting."

Nixon's office announced the decision Monday afternoon.

Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Reporting by WSIU's Jennifer Fuller.

A southern Illinois Congressman says the United States shouldn’t get involved in Syria – and worries any form of attack would put this country and its allies at greater risk.

Representative John Shimkus, R-Collinsville says the alleged use of chemical weapons by the Syrian government on civilians is an international issue – one the U.S. shouldn’t take the lead on.

(Courtesy of Abby Gillardi)

Ian Fisher and The Present

Nick Garcia talks about stories from the road with Missouri native Ian Fisher.  We'll also hear Fisher perform a few songs as well.

Tef Poe Revisited

(Kristi Luther/St. Louis Public Radio)

This story will be updated.

The dispute between St. Louis-based Patriot Coal and the United Mine Workers of America appears to be over.

The union announced today that it had reached an agreement to reduce some of the cuts in pension and health care benefits approved by a federal bankruptcy judge on May 29. 

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

In what has become known in the St. Louis region as "The Great Flood of 1993," 20 years ago places where floodwaters had never been suddenly were underwater.  

From our archives, we offer an opportunity to go back in time with 10 stories of the rise of water, tension and even an entire town.

For some, these stories may be difficult to hear again and, for others, they will be reminders of triumph and renewal.

Flickr | alancleaver_2000

Updated 6:50 a.m. Friday with names of victims and suspect.

The St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department has identified the victims as:

- Khadra Muse, a 44-year old female of the 100 block of Indian Circle Dr.

- Seaeed Abdulla, a 29-year old male of the 700 block of Cole

- Bernice Solomon-Redd, a 54-year old female of the 2400 block of Ridge Ave., E. St. Louis, IL

The suspect has been positively identified as  Ahmed Dirir, a 59-year old male of the 900 block of Carr.

Updated 8:51 p.m. Thursday. 

Cast a Line / Flickr

This is a developing story. Will update as we know more.

An accident involving a school bus has shut down traffic on southbound I-55 this morning just south of downtown St. Louis at 7th Street.

Traffic is currently backed up all the way into Illinois. (See here for the latest traffic conditions).

Updated 10:40 a.m.

(via Flickr/daysofthundr46)

Schnuck Markets says more than two million customers in the St. Louis area may have been impacted by a data breach that stretched from December 2012 until March 29.

The company said in a statement today that the cyber-attack possibly affected 79 of its 100 stores. Officials emphasized that the hackers only accessed the credit card numbers and expirations dates of victims - not their names, addresses or any identifying information.

(via Flickr/breahn)

The Missouri Supreme Court has upheld a decision striking down a 2011 law that created an incentive fund for science and technology-based businesses.

In a unanimous ruling Tuesday, the court said the law was unconstitutional because the Legislature linked it to an unrelated bill about tax credits. That separate bill ultimately did not pass during a 2011 special session.

voxefxtm | Flickr

Note: This live event has ended. Read the results of the race here.

St. Louis is a solidly Democratic city. So, when voters go to the polls today to vote in its Democratic Mayoral Primary - they are really picking the city's presumptive next mayor.

Will it be incumbent mayor Francis Slay? It would be for an unprecedented fourth term. Or Lewis Reed - the president of the Board of Aldermen? Or Jimmie Matthews - a candidate some have said is a "stalking horse?"

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Today on "St. Louis on the Air," we announced that we'll be hosting the St. Louis Mayoral Primary Forum.  Here are some of the details:

(via Flickr/Kevin Ward)

Those hoping to keep the Rams in St. Louis should not count on any help from Democratic Governor Jay Nixon or the Republican-led Missouri Senate.

When asked by reporters Monday about efforts to build a new stadium for the Rams, Governor Nixon said that the state is still paying half the cost of the Edward Jones Dome in downtown St. Louis.

“I don’t have a new stadium in this year’s budget, nor do I have any ongoing discussions on how to do that," Nixon said.

(Released by Mo. Atty. Gen. Chris Koster)

Updated 5:29 p.m. with comment from the CVC and addition of full arbitrators' report.

According to the St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission, arbitrators have chosen the plan put forth by the St. Louis Rams for the revamping of the stadium in which they play, the Edward Jones Dome.

(via Flickr/jglazer75)

The Illinois Senate returns to the Capitol on Wednesday to begin a weeklong legislative session that could take up pension reform, legalizing gay marriage and banning assault rifles.

The 97th General Assembly will finish its work Jan. 9 when a new Legislature is sworn in. That means there are many lame-duck lawmakers not returning who might feel less constrained to vote for contentious issues. The House comes in Sunday.

Gov. Pat Quinn has made it a priority for the assembly to find a solution to the state employee retirement programs that are underfunded by $96 billion.

via YouTube video/nyrainbow5

Fontella Bass, a St. Louis-born soul singer who hit the top of the R&B charts with "Rescue Me" in 1965, has died.

The singer's daughter, Neuka Mitchell, says Bass died at a St. Louis hospice Wednesday night of complications from a heart attack suffered three weeks ago. She was 72. Bass had also suffered several strokes since 2005.

via Flickr/brownpau

Illinois and local cities and towns are starting to cash in on new video gambling terminals.

The Southern Illinoisan reports that the state took in nearly $1 million in additional income in November from more than 1,400 video terminals.

More than $191,000 was distributed to towns and cities where the machines are located.

Video gambling became legal in bars, clubs and truck stops in October.

(via SLU Athletics)

Saint Louis University is hosting a public memorial service Friday for basketball coach Rick Majerus.

Hundreds are expected at the service at Chaifetz Pavilion to honor Majerus. It begins at 3:30 p.m.

Majerus coached for 25 years, the last five at Saint Louis University, where he led the Billikens to the third round of the NCAA tournament in March. He was 517-216 for his career and led Utah to the NCAA finals in 1998.

(via Flickr/aka Kath)

Illinois and the federal government have approved an environmental impact statement for the high-speed rail line under construction between Chicago and St. Louis.

The review is an important step because it identifies a route through Springfield that would end a dispute that had threatened to hold up the project.

It also recommends a route around some of the congested tangle of rail lines between Chicago and suburban Joliet. Upgrades to that suggested corridor would be $500 million cheaper than the existing route because fewer overpasses would be needed.

Bill Greenblatt | UPI | 2012 photo

Thank you for joining us for Election Day, and later, election night. Our live blog has concluded, but our coverage isn't over.

(Courtesy Saint Louis Zoo)

Updated 5:52 p.m.

Carol Perkins, a conservationist and humanitarian and the widow of famed zoologist Marlin Perkins, has died.

The Saint Louis Zoo says Carol Perkins died Saturday at her home in Clayton, Mo. She was 95 and had been in declining health.

Marlin Perkins was the director of the Saint Louis Zoo who gained international fame after becoming host of television's "Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom" in 1962. The program aired for 26 years until his death in 1986.

(via Missouri Department of Natural Resources)

A company has agreed to clean up groundwater contamination in north St. Louis County after tests raised concerns at homes near the plant.

The Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday announced a cleanup agreement with PerkinElmer Inc., a Massachusetts-based firm that operates the Missouri Metals plant. The agreement will be final after a 30-day comment period.

(via Flickr/aperte)

A group of voters is challenging the validity of a measure on this fall's ballot that would make it more difficult to improve retirement benefits for public employees.

In a statement Thursday, Republican state Senate candidate John Bambenek, of Champaign, said he and 10 other Illinois residents filed a lawsuit arguing the question is unconstitutional.

Flickr | alkruse24

The state says five Missouri charter schools are financially stressed.

Four of the schools are in St. Louis - Carondolet Leadership Academy, Grand Center Arts Academy, South City Preparatory Academy and Jamaa Learning Center. The fifth is Pathway Academy in Kansas City.

This is the first time the state has declared schools financially stressed under a new state law that requires more supervision of the publicly funded but independently run schools. The designation is based on ending balances in two key funds.

(via Flickr/The Confluence)

Federal lawmakers from several states along the Mississippi River are pressing to modernize the waterway's locks-and-dams system, which they say desperately needs repair.

Sens. Dick Durbin and Mark Kirk of Illinois, Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt from Missouri, and Tom Harkin and Chuck Grassley from Iowa are pressing the Environmental and Public Works Committee to ensure funding to hasten what they term critical improvements.

(via Flickr/denharsh)

Remember that law which would make it easier for police to track people's cellphone signals during emergencies? Well, it went into effect today, and there is already a lawsuit filed challenging it.

(via Flickr/Phil Roeder)

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman on behalf of 14 states, including Illinois, is urging the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold racial preferences in college admissions.

Schneiderman says in a brief that the Constitution permits schools to consider race as one factor in policies that foster diversity.

The court's ruling will be its first on affirmative action in higher education since 2003. Arguments will be Oct. 10.

Pages