Tim Lloyd

Reporter and Co-Host of We Live Here

Tim Lloyd grew up north of Kansas City and holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri, Columbia. Since joining St. Louis Public Radio in 2012, he has won eight Edward R Murrow Awards in categories that include Writing, Hard News, Continuing Coverage, Use of Sound and Sports Reporting.  In 2015 he won the Education Writers Association's national award for best beat reporter, broadcast.  In 2010 he received the national Debakey Journalism Award and in 2009 he won a Missouri Press Association award for Best News Feature.  Previously, he launched digital reporting efforts for Harvest Public Media, a Corporation for Public Broadcasting funded collaboration between Midwestern NPR member stations that focuses on agriculture and food issues.  His stories have aired on a variety of stations and shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, ​Marketplace, Only A Game and Here and Now.  

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Official State Photo / State of Missouri House of Representatives

Updated at 8:35 a.m. Tuesday to correct the spelling of Stacey Newman's name.

Updated with comments from Mo. State Rep. Stacey Newman

Mo. State Rep. Stacey Newman has won the special Democratic primary for the 87th District in St. Louis County, according to results posted on the Missouri Secretary of State website.   

Flickr/jdnx

Will be updated.

The quintessential symbol of the St. Louis region, the Gateway Arch, has been under special scrutiny lately as rusty stains on its structure caused concerns.

The National Park Service has released a report from a Chicago engineering firm today saying that the stains are merely cosmetic and that the Arch is "as sound today as the day it was built." (It was completed in 1965 - and for the history lovers out there, here's a gallery of that process).

Matthew Ellis / Washington University

Researchers at Washington University used new technology to unravel the entire genetic helix for a subset of breast cancer, called basal-like, and found that it is more like ovarian cancer than other types of breast cancer.

The study’s co-Leader, Mathew Ellis, said that means techniques used to tackle ovarian cancer could be more effective than traditional methods for basal-like breast cancer.

“The more we understand about an individual breast cancer the more we can actually treat the patient accurately,” Ellis said.  “I like to call this genome forward medicine.”

(via Flickr/steakpinball)

Tomorrow morning the Illinois Supreme Court will enter orders to allow cameras in both the first judicial circuit in the southern part of the state and the 18th circuit, which is outside of Chicago.   

The announcement was made this afternoon by Illinois Supreme Court Chief Justice Thomas Kilbride, who was in St. Louis to accept the “Illinoisan of the Year” award from the Illinois News Broadcasters Association.

Kilbride is the driving force behind a pilot program aimed at increasing accessibility to the legal system and expects more courts to allow cameras in the future.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

St. Louis exec pleads to fraud charges

A suburban St. Louis business executive accused of stealing from his former company has pleaded guilty to charges of wire fraud and mail fraud.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Dunard Morris pleaded guilty Friday in federal court to two counts of mail fraud and one of wire fraud.

Stikywikit / Flickr

Updated 1:45 p.m. Lock 27 reopened this morning at 3:30 a.m. after being closed for 5 days. According to the Army Corps of Engineers, it may take up to 72 hours to push through the  63 vessels and 455 barges, some from as far as New Orleans, that backed up during the closure. The Corps estimated that the closure cost nearly $3 million per day . Lock 27 underwent major rehab in the past few years and was damaged due to low water levels.

Our original story:

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

Tomorrow is the one year anniversary of Occupy Wall Street and local activist groups plan to mark the occasion by protesting biotechnology giant Monsanto.

Barbara Chicherio is with the Gateway Green Alliance, which opposes genetically modified organisms developed by St. Louis based Monsanto and other biotech companies.

She said tomorrow's protests will represent a shift within the Occupy movement to focus on specific issues.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Judge to consider claims of Mo. death row inmate

This week a special judge appointed by the Missouri Supreme Court will start taking another look at evidence used to convict Reggie Clemmons of murder in 1991.  

Yesterday a coalition of local and international activist held a pre-hearing rally in support of Clemmons at Kiener Plaza in St. Louis. 

President of the St. Louis branch of the NAACP, Adolphus Pruitt, said there are lingering questions about the evidence used to convict Clemmons.   

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

Mayors from 19 cities and towns are in St. Louis this week to launch a new initiative aimed at bringing greater attention to issues affecting the Mississippi River.

A total of 41 mayors, so far, have formally agreed to the partnership, which is set to begin lobbying congress in March of next year.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said mutual interests trump party politics.

SuperFantastic / Flickr

Representatives for Ameristar Casino say they will file a lawsuit Tuesday morning to block a November ballot question on whether or not to ban smoking in St Charles County. 

According to casino representatives, if passed, the ban could put it at a disadvantage because patrons at other casinos in the state can light up when they gamble.

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

Updated 2:19 pm Monday (Sept. 10)

The Pike County Sheriff's Department says a fourth escaped inmate, Joseph Verive, is back in the Pike County jail.  He was taken into custody on Pike 411 less than 1 mile from hwy 161 without incident.

The fifth escaped inmate, William Wilkerson, remains on the loose. 

Jennifer Boriss / Flickr

A panel of healthcare experts gathered at Washington Tabernacle today to field questions from members of the community on how the Affordable Care Act would impact their lives.

Topics ranged from small businesses to Medicaid expansion in Missouri, and a large part of the discussion focused on a ballot initiative regarding health insurance exchanges in Missouri.

(Go here for in-depth coverage on Medicaid expansion and the working poor.)

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

Supporters of a failed effort to place initiatives on the November ballot in Missouri that would cap interest rates on payday loans and raise the minimum wage rallied in St. Louis today.

From priests to teenagers, around 100 people marched around a payday loan shop on Grand Ave.

Jamala Rogers is with Jobs for Justice and helped collect signatures for the ballot initiatives.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Good morning! Here are some of today's starting headlines:

St. Louis County attitude survey results presented

Last night members of the St. Louis County Council heard the results of a survey that measured how the attitudes of residents have changed over the past five years. Many don't think the county is going in the right direction but don't place the blame on their county government.

Five years ago, a little over 60 percent of people thought the county was going in the right direction; today that number is 44 percent.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Isaac dumps rain, but Mo. drought persists

The National Weather Service says large parts of rural Missouri and Illinois had between three-to-five inches of rainfall this weekend.

In St. Louis, Oakville received three and a half inches of rain, the most in the metropolitan area.  But National Weather Service Meteorologist Jayson Gosselin said it will take much more rain to snap this summer's historic drought.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Faith leaders participate in “Labor in the Pulpits, on the Bimah, in the Minbar” 

This morning  faith leaders for more than 80 congregations across the state will deliver messages on the value of work and the need to raise the minimum wage. 

The event is being organized by Missouri Jobs with Justice, and is part of what it says is a campaign to pair religious leadership with labor advocates.

The group says it’s working to raise awareness about challenges facing minimum wage workers and the need to cap the interest rate on pay day loans.  

National Weather Service

*This story will be updated 

*Updated Sunday at 2:45 p.m. with details river levels and drought relief 

Large parts of rural Missouri and Illinois had between three to five inches of rainfall this weekend, according to the National Weather Service.

In St. Louis, Nation Weather Service Meteorologist Jayson Gosselin said Oakville received three and a half inches of rain, the most in the metropolitan area. 

Gosselin added, though, that it will take much more rain to snap this summer’s historic drought.

Samuel Clemens, who is said to have taken his pen name Mark Twain from the cries of riverboat crewmen, found the inspiration for his classic works while growing up in the river town of Hannibal, Mo. Today, more than 125 years after the first pressing of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, there's a new set of artistic characters in Twain's boyhood home.

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Updated with more detailed figures on funding

The Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) gave the public a look tonight at its plan to build what it calls a “lid” to connect downtown St. Louis with the Gateway Arch.

But before it breaks ground, MoDOT Engineer Deanna Venker said the agency has to take into account a whole range of potential impacts.

(via Flickr/taberandrew)

Lenders in St. Louis County will soon be required to offer mediation to homeowners on the edge of foreclosure.

Councilwoman Hazel Erby, who introduced the new plan, told council members something had to be done to help slow the rate of foreclosures in the county.

“On behalf of the many families who contacted me over the last year and shared their difficult stories about losing their homes,” Erby Said. “I hope they know that this ordinance is in their honor.”

(National Weather Service)

The latest forecast from the National Weather Service shows the remnants of Hurricane Isaac passing through the St. Louis region on Saturday morning. 

That has local officials getting ready for problems that could result from a major rainfall.

Metropolitan Sewer District spokesman Lance LeComb said storms like Isaac have historically presented the greatest threat of flash flooding.

(via Flickr/comedy_nose)

The Edwardsville School Board approved a new contract with teachers tonight, ending talk of a potential strike. 

The new, two year deal gives teachers assurances that the district will take action if class sizes get too large, which was a key sticking point in the previous contract offer. 

And even though teacher pay is frozen for this year, teacher’s union president Dave Boedeker said he’s happy with the compromise.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Romney accuses Democrats of using Akin to attack Republican Party

In the run up to his party's nomination for president this week, Republican Mitt Romney is again distancing himself from embattled Missouri Senate candidate Todd Akin.

The presumptive Republican Presidential nominee told Fox News on Sunday morning that Democrats are using the uproar over Akin's comments on rape and abortion to attack the rest of the Republican Party.

Courtesy the Open Spaces Council

Volunteers in St. Louis and eastern Missouri spent the weekend sprucing up 500 miles of the Meramec River and its tributaries.

From tires to an old sink, teams hauled away boat loads of junk, literally.

Callie Walla is the event and volunteer coordinator for The Open Space Council, which organized the event.

She said the low water level brought on by the lingering drought made it easier and safer for everyone.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

Members of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra serenaded officials and more than 40 onlookers as the ribbon was cut on the refurbished Grand Ave. Bridge.

Dignitaries said the bridge will be a critical link in the heart of the city, connecting cultural institutions at Grand Center with St. Louis University and Harris Stowe State University.   

Alderwoman Marlene Davis expects the $22 million bridge project and the adjoining $7 million Metro Scott Ave. Transit Project to yield an economic boost.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Updtated at 5:52 p.m. with comments from Democratic Senator Claire McCaskill

Congressman Todd Akin didn't drop out of the race for US Senate yesterday before the legal deadline, despite significant local and national pressure otherwise. He would now need a court order to leave the race.

Here's how the day after the deadline has looked so far:

For the second week in a row, residents lined up to tell councilmembers that mandatory mediation would help save homeowners facing foreclosure.

But Councilwoman Hazel Erby, who sponsored the bill, moved to table its final passage at least until next week.

“We’re looking over some things,” Erby said.  “We just received some letters, so, we’re taking those into consideration.”

When asked, Erby didn’t specify what additional information needed to be considered.

Will be updated.

Updated 10:46 p.m. Palin suggests a third party candidate

Sarah Palin, who backed Sarah Steelman during the heated GOP Senate primary, is suggesting a third party candidate to run against Akin.

Speaking to Fox News Palin said: "Bless his heart, I don't want to pile on Todd Akin." 

But, she then said that it's time for Akin to step aside.

"Missouri is a must-win state," Palin said.  "The way we do that is to have someone like Sarah Steelman be able to run, even if it's as a third-party candidate, to be able to run and take this back."

Updated 5:00 p.m. with deadline passing, Akin remaining in the race

Updated 4:36 p.m. with additional reporting. A full list of earlier updates can be found at the end of the post. Original story posted Aug. 21 12.33 p.m.

Despite tremendous pressure on him to act otherwise, Todd Akin will stay in the race against Claire McCaskill for US Senate. 

The deadline for Akin to remove himself from the race was 5 p.m. CT today. He will need a court order by Sept. 25 if he wants to drop out beyond this point.

Saying that the positions he and others have taken against abortion will "strengthen our country and it's going to strengthen the Republican Party," Missouri Rep. Todd Akin said just before 1:30 p.m. ET that he will not withdraw from his state's Senate race by a 6 p.m. ET deadline this evening.

Metro will reopen its bus and MetroLink stops at the Grand Ave. Bridge tomorrow morning.

While crews were renovating the Grand Ave. Bridge, Metro was sprucing up its bus and train stops.

Upgrades include new seating at the bus stop along with redone elevators and stairs to the MetroLink station below the bridge.

Metro spokeswoman Patti Beck said the stop is a key part of Metro’s busiest route.

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