Tim Lloyd

Reporter and Co-Host of We Live Here

Tim Lloyd grew up north of Kansas City and holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri, Columbia. Since joining St. Louis Public Radio in 2012, he has won eight Edward R Murrow Awards in categories that include Writing, Hard News, Continuing Coverage, Use of Sound and Sports Reporting.  In 2015 he won the Education Writers Association's national award for best beat reporter, broadcast.  In 2010 he received the national Debakey Journalism Award and in 2009 he won a Missouri Press Association award for Best News Feature.  Previously, he launched digital reporting efforts for Harvest Public Media, a Corporation for Public Broadcasting funded collaboration between Midwestern NPR member stations that focuses on agriculture and food issues.  His stories have aired on a variety of stations and shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, ​Marketplace, Only A Game and Here and Now.  

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Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

The idea of a health care exchange in Missouri continues to be a political sticking point between Republicans and Democrats.

Today, Governor Jay Nixon did his best to sidestep the issue.

In fact, Nixon says he hasn’t really looked at how the ballot measure is written.

As for the idea of health care exchanges in general, the governor isn’t ready to commit.

via Flickr/J_D_R

A new ordinance in St. Louis County will soon require that businesses are up to date with property tax payments and officials say the new rule could generate up to $35 million in revenue. 

The ordinance closes a loophole that allowed businesses to be issued permits and licenses even if they didn't pay their property tax.

St. Louis County Director of Revenue Eugene Leung hopes the move will save residents money.

(via Flickr/Be.Futureproof)

Starting today, motorists in Illinois will see safe driving messages on the state's digital road signs.

The campaign from the Illinois Department of Transportation is an effort to reduce the number of fatal accidents in the state. So far this year, 479 people have died on Illinois roads, compared with 418 by the same time last year.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Early drought exacting a toll on regional corn farmers

Extreme heat and drought are driving down what many farmers expected to be a bumper corn crop.  

Back in March and April, warm weather had Midwestern farmers planting corn at a record setting pace.

In Illinois alone, an estimated more than 13 million acres of corn were planted this year.  

Now, many growers are in full on damage control as record setting heat continues to drive down expected yields.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

Congressman Lacy Clay is asking fellow St. Louis Democrat Russ Carnahan to knock it off with claims that he was in cahoots with Republicans to consolidate St. Louis's two congressional districts

Both Clay and Carnahan are vying for the Democratic nomination for the 1st Congressional District.

The issue has become a bit of a he-said-he-said between the former congressional allies, and Clay says he's just trying to get the facts straight.

(via Flickr/Jack W. Reid)

Thermostats turned to extra low and the blistering heat has put added stress on Ameren Missouri's power system.

There have been a handful of small power outages throughout the region, but so far nothing major.  And looking at a week of triple digit high temperatures, Ameren Missouri says it’s ready to take on the extended heat wave.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Medicaid expansion program in St. Louis

Days after the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its ruling on the Affordable Care Act a Medicaid expansion program kicks off today in St. Louis.

Gateway to Better health is a federal demonstration project that expands Medicaid coverage for low income residents of St. Louis City and County.

The 18 month pilot program is fueled by a $25 million federal grant.

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Updated at 3:53 pm with details on fire containment

A fire that burned between 550 and 600 acres at Mark Twain National Forest is partially contained.

The forest's fire management officer, Jody Eberly, said Saturday that crews plan to spend the weekend mopping up around the fire's perimeter.

Meanwhile, Gov. Jay Nixon flew Saturday over the burned land in southeast Missouri's Iron County. He says numerous smaller fires are burning across state.

pasa47 / Flickr

The City of St. Louis has unveiled its plan to renovate the Soulard Market and Park.

Physical improvements would include completely enclosing the market, expanding parking options and adding signage that distinguishes venders that are selling locally grown food from vendors that are reselling produce or other food items.

The farmers market would be open all weekend, too.

Citing a survey indicating strong customer demand, the market would shift from being open Wednesday through Saturday to Thursday through Sunday. 

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

US Secretary of Education Arne Duncan pulled up a chair in a circle of desks and asked students what they do to avoid conflict.

The summer school class he attended at Vashon High School is paid for by a federal grant aimed at turning around struggling schools.

The school will receive $378,536 from the grant for fiscal year 2012-2013 and Duncan says his department is getting its money’s worth. 

(via Flickr/breahn)

The St. Louis County Economic Council is opening the doors to its new biotech incubator on Monday afternoon and the agency says it will serve as a launching pad for biotech businesses.

Officials say The Helix Center Biotech Incubator is a 17,000 square foot facility loaded with lab and office space with a prime location next to the Danforth Plant Center.

Entrepreneurial efforts are nothing new to the council, which runs four other incubators in the region.

J Wynia / Flickr

Last night the East-West Gateway Council of Governments wrapped up a series of open houses for Missouri residents who have questions about the agency’s $2 billion transportation plan.

Earlier this month the organization that oversees regional ground transportation projects released its funding report for the next three fiscal years.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Quinn will close two prisons, including Tamms

Rachel Otwell contributed reporting from Springfield, Ill.

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn made it official on Tuesday - he will close two state prisons, including the state's supermax facility in Tamms.

Rep. Brandon Phelps, of Harrisburg, says he received a brief memo from Quinn, saying that Tamms and a prison in Dwight will close, as well as juvenile detention centers in Joliet and Murphysboro. That's despite legislators including money in the 2013 budget for the facilities.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

There usually isn't much of a market for old streetcars, many of which were built in the 1920s. And the ones you can find are usually in pretty bad shape.

So when officials from the Loop Trolley project got a tip that five well-maintained cars were sitting in storage in Seattle, they headed west to investigate - and liked what they saw, said project manager Doug Campion.

"The fact that it's a full fleet, my goodness," Campion said. "This could be very good for us, very helpful."

St. Charles County Department of Corrections

Updated at 6:15 am Wednesday with comments from U.S. attorney

For the second time in four days, the former co-owner of a once prominent marketer of auto service contracts has pleaded guilty.

Cory Atkinson of Lake St. Louis, Mo., on Monday pleaded guilty to federal charges including conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and filing false tax returns. On Thursday, he pleaded guilty to state charges that included insurance fraud and stealing.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Guards charged with assault for inmate fight

Two guards at the medium security jail in St. Louis City are facing burglary and assault charges for allegedly arranging to have one inmate at the workhouse beat up another.

(via Flickr/frankjuarez)

A new spending plan for K-12 education in Missouri is now law.

Gov. Jay Nixon signed the education budget last night at a Kansas City-area Boys State event.

The budget includes record funding for public schools, but remains below the levels called for in the state's education funding formula. A fix was supposed to be a priority for lawmakers in the last legislative session, but the Republican Party couldn't agree on a solution.

comedy nose | Flickr

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says he will sign the budget for the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education this evening.  

Gov. Nixon is promoting the fact that the budget provides a record amount of funding for K-12 schools, an increase of $5 million.   Despite the increase, that number is short what's called for by the state’s funding formula. 

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Missouri's no-call list set to expand

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon will be in St. Louis today to sign legislation that allows people to add cellphones to the state’s Do Not Call list.

Nixon created the list when he was attorney general. Cellphone numbers added to the list would be off limits to most solicitations, including text messages.

Attorney General Chris Koster, whose office maintains the list, is expected to join Nixon. Koster says his office gets nearly 200 complaints a week from cellphone users about unwanted telemarketing calls.

Derringdos / Flickr

Updated 10:34 a.m. June 13, 2012 with announcement of third seal death.

The Saint Louis Zoo has announced the death of a third seal (the one which was left at the Indianapolis Zoo for observation and treatment). The seal, Cri Cri, was 19 years old. 

A necropsy will be performed by the College of Veterinary Medicine at Purdue University to try to find the cause of death of Cri Cri. Necropsies were performed for the other two seals who died by the Saint Louis Zoo's veterinary pathologist.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

St. Louis County Council gives initial approves $46 million budget for Metro

Last night the St. Louis County Council moved one step closer to approving two funding bills for the public transit agency, Metro -  despite one councilman raising concerns about how the agency has spent tax dollars in the past.

Councilman Steve Stenger had threatened to withhold around $6 million- the amount Metro transit paid to a developer in 2010 for spaces in a Brentwood parking garage.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

The three Republicans vying for the right to challenge Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill in November didn't stray far from the party's script at a debate in St. Charles last night.

Updated 8:50 am Tuesday with statement from Sen. Blunt.

The US Veterans Administrations Inspector General has issued a report following complaints that a nurse did not act appropriately when treating two patients receiving hemodialysis treatment at the John Cochran VA Medical Center.  

The nurse  did not report changes in one of the patient’s condition, and the 57-year-old man died the next day, according to the report.  

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Finding from Washington University could hold key to more targeted breast cancer treatments

Researchers at Washington University have uncovered a genetic mutation that explains why some women don't respond to a common form of breast cancer treatment.

Before surgery, most women with breast cancer receive aromatase inhibitors, which reduce the production of estrogen to shrink the size of tumors. But it doesn't always work.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

Take a drive through rural Missouri or Illinois and you’ll fly by row after row of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in the form of crops like corn and soybeans. 

Depending on who you talk to those crops are modern marvels or a threat to our food supply.

Now, local activists have joined other groups from around the country in an effort to require labels be placed on food made with GMO ingredients, which can range from soft drinks to breakfast cereal.

(Combined photos - both by UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The Paycheck Fairness Act, which proponents say would strengthen women's ability to get equal pay in the workplace, failed a procedural vote in the U.S. Senate on Tuesday. Just like yesterday's vote, Missouri's senators are sharply split along party lines.

Missouri's Republican senator Roy Bunt says the bill doesn't have much to do with "fair pay" and a whole lot to do with litigation.

(courtesy of Ted Heisel/Missouri Coalition for the Environment)

Updated at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday to correct election date error and add vote totals.

There was sparse voter turnout but overwhelming support for a major bond issue Tuesday that will allow the Metropolitan St. Louis  Sewer District, to gradually increase rates to pay for necessary upgrades.

Referred to as Proposition Y, the bond issue’s passage means the average MSD customer’s bill will go up from around $29 a month to nearly $44 over the next four years.  That's compared to almost $65 a month had the bond issue not been approved. 

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Metro sees double-digit increase in bus passengers

St. Louis’ mass transit agency saw the biggest growth in bus ridership in the country during the first three months of the year.

(courtesy of Ted Heisel/Missouri Coalition for the Environment)

Customers of the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District can expect a bigger bill in July.  A vote tomorrow will determine if those increases are gradual or immediate.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Ill. DNR director cannot rule out park closures

Amanda Vinicky contributed reporting from Springfield.

The director of the Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources says his department will do all it can to keep the state's parks open after the failure of a $2 increase in license plate fees that would have provided a funding stream the the DNR.

But Marc Miller says he can't rule anything out, because the department has seen its budget slashed by 50 percent over the last decade.

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