Tim Lloyd

Education Reporter

Tim Lloyd grew up north of Kansas City and holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri, Columbia. Since joining St. Louis Public Radio in 2012, he has won seven Edward R Murrow Awards in categories that include Writing, Hard News, Continuing Coverage, Use of Sound and Sports Reporting.  In 2015 he won the Education Writers Association's national award for best beat reporter, broadcast.  In 2010 he received the national Debakey Journalism Award and in 2009 he won a Missouri Press Association award for Best News Feature.  Previously, he launched digital reporting efforts for Harvest Public Media, a Corporation for Public Broadcasting funded collaboration between Midwestern NPR member stations that focuses on agriculture and food issues.  His stories have aired on a variety of stations and shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, ​Marketplace, Only A Game and Here and Now.  

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The St. Louis County Council moved forward tonight with a bill that would require lenders to offer mediation for homeowners on the edge of foreclosure.

During a public meeting on the plan, many community members told the council that mediation may have saved them from foreclosure.

For Councilwoman Kathleen Kelly Burkett, it was personal.   She was on the edge of tears when she told the story of foreclosing on her mother’s house.  

Councilwoman Hazel Erby, who originally introduced the bill, said they have to take action now.  

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

Around 200 teachers and a handful of parents protested before the Edwardsvill School Board meeting last night.

Frustrated by the latest contract offer they received from district officials, teachers could announce plans to strike later this month.

Edwardsville Education Association Co-President Dave Boedeker said they are especially concerned about clauses in their contract that they say could open the door to larger classes.

(via St. Louis Public Schools)

Updated 5:10 p.m. Aug. 13:

St. Louis Public Schools has released its attendance figures for the first day of school:

  • 20,283 students in Kindergarten through 12th grade attended classes today
  • According to SLPS, the number shows a 10.25 percent increase over the previous year’s first day attendance of 18,397

Three new schools opened to address the closing of six Imagine charter schools in St. Louis. The new schools had the following first-day attendance numbers:

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Heading into special session, Ill. lawmakers remain divided on pensions

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn has called for a special session on Friday to overhaul he state's pensions, even though Illinois lawmakers are still divided over the best way to do so.

There's an $83 billion gap in what the state has promised its employees they'll get when they retire, and what Illinois actually has in the bank.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

A handful of homeless people milled about in the shade of a big green and white tent in suburban St. Louis County.

The massive canopy represents the latest in a string of attempts by Rev. Larry Rice of the New Life Evangelistic Center to set up a camp for the homeless.  

St. Louis County officials and police were on hand Saturday morning while Rice began setting up the camp in a vacant lot on Lada Avenue.

Officials told Rice that he did not file the proper paperwork to have a portable toilet, and that he could not have multiple tents.  

rcbodden / Flickr

Updated 9:15 a.m. August 9:

St. Louis County confirmed its fourth heat-related death of the summer today.

A son discovered the victim, a 76-year-old Lemay man, on July 10. The cause of death was certified on Wednesday.

The victim lived in the 700 block of Military Rd. The brick house had no central air conditioning, and a window unit was not working. The temperature inside the home was estimated to be between 90 and 95 degrees.

Albrecht Dürer / Wikimedia Commons

The American Civil Liberties Union filed a class action lawsuit late this afternoon that takes issue with part of Amendment Two, which deals with prayer and religious expression in Missouri.  

Amendment Two specifically protects public prayer and lets students avoid assignments that violate their religious beliefs.

Tony Rothert, legal director for the ACLU’s eastern Missouri division, said the lawsuit is focused on this specific phrase:

This section shall not be construed to expand the rights of prisoners in state or local custody beyond those afforded by the laws of the United States.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Police search for missing boy

Searchers are looking for a 12-year-old St. Louis County boy last seen Sunday night after telling his family he was going to swing on a rope on the Meramec River. A missing person advisory went out early Monday morning for Christopher Marks. He was last seen at about 7:30 p.m. last night in Pacific. Police are assembling this morning at the river with plans to search the water and the heavily-wooded area near it.

Lambert Airport detours end this morning

(via Flickr/dbking)

If you’re dropping someone off at Lambert Airport Monday morning expect a welcome surprise.

Months of roadwork has been completed and detours in front of baggage claim at Lambert’s Terminal 1 are coming to an end.

“So, it’s back to normal for our travelers as well as those picking up passengers,” Airport Spokesman Jeff Lea said.

Passenger pickup and most of the of the ground transportation loading areas are back to normal, too.

The majority of lower level exits will reopen Monday, as well, but some work will continue on the west end of the roadway.

Courtesy STL Crane Project

Art Hill in Forest Park is the temporary home for 1,000 origami cranes this weekend. 

More than 100 volunteers helped make the cranes, which can be “adopted” for $10 each at 10 a.m. Sunday. 

The proceeds go to benefit Backstoppers, a local charity that assists the families of public safety workers who die in the line of duty. 

St. Louis Public Radio photo

Management at Lambert Airport has signed off on an agreement with the Hudson Group to offer travelers a new lineup of retail stores.

If the St. Louis Board of Alderman green lights the deal, Hudson Group will take over 14 locations, boosting the total number of shops by three.    

Proposed new retail concepts range from one focused on St. Louis sports teams to an Eddie Bauer clothing shop. 

Airport spokesman Jeff Lea said the deal will also bring in guaranteed extra revenue.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

Glendale police have called on the Major Case Squad to help investigate a shooting that left a mother and her two children dead in the Glendale neighborhood Monday.

Lieutenant Tim Fagan of the Greater St. Louis Major Case Squad says the investigation is fluid and he says authorities will work the theory that it was a murder suicide.

But Fagan says he isn’t willing to rule out any scenario.

“We haven’t come to what would be a full conclusion as to what would have happened,” Fagan said.  “The totality of the circumstances, I don’t have everything I need at this time.”

(via John Brunner for Senate; file photo; Wikimedia Commons/U.S. House of Representatives).

Most of the people gathered outside of Washington University’s Edison Theater before a recent GOP Senate Primary debate already knew who they were voting for.  

But Shelby Hewerdine wasn’t sure yet.

So, she drove in from St. Charles to get a better feel for the character of each candidate.

“I don’t know how else people are going to look at it because they are very similar on the issues, so, we’ll see,” Hewerdine said.  

And during the debate, the three main candidates laid out basically the same policy platform. 

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Review your route: I-64 work has begun

Several ramps on the stretch of I-64 that runs through downtown closed for roadwork this morning.

The ramps from 10th Street and 14th Street will be closed around the clock, as will the ramp from Broadway.

Missouri Department of Transportation spokesman Andrew Gates says there will also be ramp closures for motorists heading into downtown.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

About 50 different churches and groups gathered yesterday to provide assistance to St. Louis residents living in poverty.

Services offered included voter registration, resume services, back to school and youth sports physicals and other health services.

Organizers said it took around a year to plan and coordinate the event with Convoy of Hope, a national faith-based anti-poverty organization.

Bishop Lawrence Wooten said it brought together religious groups that haven’t worked together in the past. 

(Adam Allington/St. Louis Public Radio)

A new report from the United States Department of Agriculture shows the ongoing drought has caused the nation's cattle herd to shrink by more than 2 million head so far this year.

Analysts project the dry weather will impact prices in the checkout aisle.

Today, we have two reports on the effects of the 2012 drought.  In this combined feature, Adam Allington takes a look at the region's corn farmers.

But first, St. Louis Public Radio's Tim Lloyd reports on the agonizing choices faced by Missouri cattle ranchers.      

(via Flickr/Trailnet)

The St. Louis County Parks Department presented its business plan to the County Council last night, and for now, no park closures are being discussed. 

Officials with the parks department said they’re doing their best to cut unnecessary expenses and uncover new revenue streams, but currently the department has a $500,000 budget shortfall for 2013.

The budget outlook could get much worse in 2014, and Parks Department Director Tom Ott said they would need to make drastic cuts without adequate funding.

The Drought is starting to severely impact shipping along the Mississippi River as water levels continue to drop.

The region’s shipping companies have had to lighten their loads to keep from running aground and that’s starting to cut into their bottom lines.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

The longer the drought lingers, the harder it is to snap

Temperatures are expected to get back into the triple digits today and there is little chance of rain in the coming week. 

That’s making it less likely the worst drought in at least a quarter century will be snapped any time soon. 

National Weather Service Meteorologist Jon Carney said a lack of ground moisture in the region is making rain less likely.

(via Flickr/taberandrew)

A bill introduced at the St. Louis County Council meeting last night would require lenders give homeowners a chance to go into mediation before foreclosure.

On the surface the bill is straightforward, but the details of the process could take months to iron out. 

Nevertheless, Councilwoman Hazel Erby said as the foreclosure crisis lingers she felt compelled to ask for the bill’s introduction.

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