Tim Lloyd

Education Reporter

Tim Lloyd grew up north of Kansas City and holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri, Columbia. Since joining St. Louis Public Radio in 2012, he has won six Edward R Murrow Awards in categories that include Writing, Hard News, Continuing Coverage, Use of Sound and Sports Reporting.  In 2010 he received the national Debakey Journalism Award and in 2009 he won a Missouri Press Association award for Best News Feature.  Previously, he launched digital reporting efforts for Harvest Public Media, a Corporation for Public Broadcasting funded collaboration between Midwestern NPR member stations that focuses on agriculture and food issues.  His stories have aired on a variety of stations and shows including Morning Edition, ​Marketplace, Only A Game and Here and Now.  

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(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Guards charged with assault for inmate fight

Two guards at the medium security jail in St. Louis City are facing burglary and assault charges for allegedly arranging to have one inmate at the workhouse beat up another.

(via Flickr/frankjuarez)

A new spending plan for K-12 education in Missouri is now law.

Gov. Jay Nixon signed the education budget last night at a Kansas City-area Boys State event.

The budget includes record funding for public schools, but remains below the levels called for in the state's education funding formula. A fix was supposed to be a priority for lawmakers in the last legislative session, but the Republican Party couldn't agree on a solution.

comedy nose | Flickr

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says he will sign the budget for the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education this evening.  

Gov. Nixon is promoting the fact that the budget provides a record amount of funding for K-12 schools, an increase of $5 million.   Despite the increase, that number is short what's called for by the state’s funding formula. 

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Missouri's no-call list set to expand

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon will be in St. Louis today to sign legislation that allows people to add cellphones to the state’s Do Not Call list.

Nixon created the list when he was attorney general. Cellphone numbers added to the list would be off limits to most solicitations, including text messages.

Attorney General Chris Koster, whose office maintains the list, is expected to join Nixon. Koster says his office gets nearly 200 complaints a week from cellphone users about unwanted telemarketing calls.

Derringdos / Flickr

Updated 10:34 a.m. June 13, 2012 with announcement of third seal death.

The Saint Louis Zoo has announced the death of a third seal (the one which was left at the Indianapolis Zoo for observation and treatment). The seal, Cri Cri, was 19 years old. 

A necropsy will be performed by the College of Veterinary Medicine at Purdue University to try to find the cause of death of Cri Cri. Necropsies were performed for the other two seals who died by the Saint Louis Zoo's veterinary pathologist.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

St. Louis County Council gives initial approves $46 million budget for Metro

Last night the St. Louis County Council moved one step closer to approving two funding bills for the public transit agency, Metro -  despite one councilman raising concerns about how the agency has spent tax dollars in the past.

Councilman Steve Stenger had threatened to withhold around $6 million- the amount Metro transit paid to a developer in 2010 for spaces in a Brentwood parking garage.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

The three Republicans vying for the right to challenge Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill in November didn't stray far from the party's script at a debate in St. Charles last night.

Updated 8:50 am Tuesday with statement from Sen. Blunt.

The US Veterans Administrations Inspector General has issued a report following complaints that a nurse did not act appropriately when treating two patients receiving hemodialysis treatment at the John Cochran VA Medical Center.  

The nurse  did not report changes in one of the patient’s condition, and the 57-year-old man died the next day, according to the report.  

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Finding from Washington University could hold key to more targeted breast cancer treatments

Researchers at Washington University have uncovered a genetic mutation that explains why some women don't respond to a common form of breast cancer treatment.

Before surgery, most women with breast cancer receive aromatase inhibitors, which reduce the production of estrogen to shrink the size of tumors. But it doesn't always work.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

Take a drive through rural Missouri or Illinois and you’ll fly by row after row of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in the form of crops like corn and soybeans. 

Depending on who you talk to those crops are modern marvels or a threat to our food supply.

Now, local activists have joined other groups from around the country in an effort to require labels be placed on food made with GMO ingredients, which can range from soft drinks to breakfast cereal.

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