Tim Lloyd

Reporter and Co-Host of We Live Here

Tim Lloyd grew up north of Kansas City and holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri, Columbia. Since joining St. Louis Public Radio in 2012, he has won eight Edward R Murrow Awards in categories that include Writing, Hard News, Continuing Coverage, Use of Sound and Sports Reporting.  In 2015 he won the Education Writers Association's national award for best beat reporter, broadcast.  In 2010 he received the national Debakey Journalism Award and in 2009 he won a Missouri Press Association award for Best News Feature.  Previously, he launched digital reporting efforts for Harvest Public Media, a Corporation for Public Broadcasting funded collaboration between Midwestern NPR member stations that focuses on agriculture and food issues.  His stories have aired on a variety of stations and shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, ​Marketplace, Only A Game and Here and Now.  

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Art McCoy
Ferguson-Florissant website / Art McCoy

Updated Feb. 23, 2014 

Lawyers for Superintendent Art McCoy and the Ferguson-Florissant School District have agreed to a hearing date of March 12-13, according to a district spokesperson. 

McCoy is currently on administrative leave with pay.

This will be McCoy's first opportunity to respond to the board's charges.

For the board, the hearing is a necessary step before it could dismiss McCoy.

St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson (L) and St. Louis Circut Attorney Jennifer Joyce look on as St. Louis Fire Chief Dennis Jenkerson talks to reporters about the city's "no refusal" policy with drunk drivers. Prosecutors will now seek warrants to draw bloo
Bill Greenblatt/UPI

The end of state control of the St. Louis Police Department was literally centuries in the making. But St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson said the change hasn’t been obvious to city residents. 


And that, he said, is a good thing.

“Local control has been a significant step for the metropolitan police department,” Dotson said. “And really, you haven’t noticed anything. It’s been seamless and transparent like it was supposed to be.”

comedy_nose / Flickr

Twelve St. Louis area schools with low academic performance will receive a total of more than $6.2 million in federal money to kick start classroom improvement.

The money comes from the U.S. Department of Education’s School Improvement Grant (SIG) program, which is distributing more than $43 million nationally to seven states. 

Remko van Dokkum | Flickr

The path to a high school equivalency certificate in Missouri is about to be rewired.

Starting in January the GED exam, which has been used in the state since the 1940s, will be replaced.  It’s a move driven by digital change and an age old consideration -- cost.

Keyboards replace pencils

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

Parents and community members concerned about the fate of two south city elementary schools breathed a sigh of a relief on Thursday night.  

The superintendent of St. Louis Public Schools, Kelvin Adams, told the Special Administrative Board that the district should renovate and keep open Shenandoah and Mann Elementary Schools.

With no further action needed from the board, the future of the historic schools is now secure. 

Adams’ recommendation was greeted by a chorus of applause from concerned parents who attended the meeting.    

Courtesy Eileen Tyrrell

Eileen Tyrrell, co-founder of the citizens group Rockwood Stakeholders for Real Solutions, announced her candidacy for the Rockwood School District’s school board this morning.

“Our key goal is accountability on all levels though the district, transparency of the business transactions,” Tyrrell said.  “The other goal that I’m going to bring is let’s give the classroom back to the teacher, the parent and to the student.”

As a board member, Tyrrell said she would also work to ensure that district decisions can be effectively implemented in the classroom.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public radio

  The crowd was a lot smaller at Wednesday night’s second hearing called by Missouri state school officials into the future of the Normandy school district, but its passion remained strong.

And its message was a simple one: Their school district deserves more time to turn itself around, so the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) should come up with a plan that stops students transfers and helps Normandy survive.

knittymarie / Flickr

Teachers in Mount Olive Ill. are going on strike Monday morning.   

The dispute between teachers and the board of education in the small town about 50 miles north east of St. Louis hinges on salary, retirement benefits and health insurance.

“We’ve bargained through the terms of an expired contract through last August and this is the point it’s come to,” said Marcus Albrecht, regional director for the Illinois Education Association.

A key sticking point is teacher pay in their last four years of employment.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis startup wants to provide schools with a curriculum, training and support to help teachers show students how to write computer code so they can land a good job even if they don't go to college.

To get an idea of why training students to write computer code should be a higher priority for schools, consider these numbers:

Cast a Line / Flickr

After traveling the state to get feedback from educators and community members, the Missouri House Interim Committee on Education has released its final report.

Among the recommendations is a tuition limit for what an unaccredited district pays when a student transfers to an accredited district in the same or adjoining county.

(Go here for an FAQ on student transfers)

jimbowen0306 / Flickr

A special session of the Missouri legislature will get underway this evening with the hopes of bringing thousands of new jobs to the state.

Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon will ask the GOP-controlled House and Senate to approve up to $150 million in annual tax breaks and economic incentives to lure Boeing into building its new 777X passenger plane in Missouri.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

The Superintendent of the Ferguson-Florissant School District, Art McCoy, spoke publicly today for the first time about being placed on administrative leave by the school board on Nov. 6.

Last week the Missouri Department of Education said it had found “significant alterations” to 2012 student attendance data that was submitted in August, and that it will work with district staff to make the necessary corrections. The state factors attendance numbers into how much funding a district will receive.   

If your daily commute includes heading west out of downtown St. Louis on I-70, you may need to find an alternate route.

Shortly after rush hour on Monday morning, the Missouri Department of Transportation is permanently closing the ramp from Pine Street to westbound I-70.

The closure paves the way for work on the Park Over the Highway, which is part of the CityArchRiver 2015 plans to revamp the Gateway Arch grounds.

MoDOT spokesman Andrew Gates said the ramp will ultimately be replaced early next year.

(File images)

During the University of Missouri Board of Curators' two-day meeting at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, the board unanimously approved the merger of the non-profit news organizations St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon, which is expected to be completed next month.

Leadership at both organizations has been planning the merger for more than a year.

St. Louis Public Radio’s license is held by the University of Missouri Curators, and the merger required the board’s approval.

arty representation of jackson on currency
_J_D_R_ | Flickr

In Missouri, the average student loan debt for people between 25 and 34-years-old has increased by about 120 percent over the past eight years. In Illinois, that number has jumped more than 140 percent, according to a report from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

Nationally, student loan debt has topped the $1 trillion mark, surpassing credit card debt and auto loans.  

Tim Eby / St. Louis Public Radio

Will be updated

A fast moving storm system damaged buildings, uprooted trees and downed power lines across the St. Louis region on Sunday and left tens of thousands of Missourians without power.

Ameren Missouri was reporting more than 37,000 outages Sunday afternoon, mostly in the St. Louis area.

Dianitia Butler has been in the Normandy School District her entire life.

The senior at Normandy High School is quick to tell you that it’s been a rough year, and she’s especially frustrated by staff reductions brought on by expenses associated with school transfer.

Despite the challenges, she’ll also tell you that school spirit is alive and well. 

“It’s definitely students coming together as one,” Butler said, who is also the student representative for the school board.   “Seeing that we’re all in this together.”

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

This afternoon several community activists in north St. Louis County voiced their frustration with the Ferguson-Florissant School Board’s decision to place Superintendent Art McCoy on administrative leave.

Rev. Freddy Clark of Shalom Church, City of Peace said parents and community members want an explanation, immediately.  Clark, who is part of the Citizen’s Task Force on Excellence in Education, denounced the move and said McCoy is a gifted educator.

St. Louis Public Radio Staff / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay announced a new program today that’s geared toward building low-income housing near MetroLink stations and MetroBus stops.

The city will use $1 million from the Affordable Housing Trust Fund to spur development around public transit.      

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said easing transportation costs can help low-income residents move up the income ladder, giving them affordable access to things like jobs and education.  

Big picture, he said the idea falls under the city’s Sustainability Plan.  

breahn / Flickr

Companies from across the St. Louis region are launching a new program on Monday that’s aimed at steering women toward careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, related fields.

The mentoring and job shadowing project is a partnership between the private all-girls Catholic high school Cor Jesu Academy and companies that include Ameren, Watlow and Barry-Wehmille Companies, Inc.

President of Cor Jesu Academy, Sister Barbara Thomas, said they’ve worked with each company so that a woman engineer is onsite to guide students.

NathanReed / Flickr

Community leaders and local politicians from across the St. Louis region gathered at Harris Stowe University on Saturday to network and share ideas on how to build stronger neighborhoods.

The day-long event was organized by the St. Louis Association of Community Organizations (SLACO) and geared toward building connected neighborhoods from the ground up.  

SLAYCO’s Executive Director, Nancy Thompson, said developing relationships between stakeholders is critical to the region as a whole.  

Official Photo, U.S. House of Representatives

Former Missouri Congressman Ike Skelton, a champion of the military who served 17 terms in the U.S. House before losing a re-election bid in 2010, has died. He was 81.

Skelton died Monday at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington, Va., surrounded by family and friends, including longtime colleague Russell Orban. 

The cause was not immediately released, but Orban says Skelton entered the hospital a week earlier with a cough. Orban confirmed Skelton's death to The Associated Press. 

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

For Cardinals fans looking to pick up tickets to tonight’s World Series game, St. Louis City Chief of Police Sam Dotson has a simple piece of advice: buyer beware.

There were around 80 instances of phony tickets being sold for Game 3, but he says police were able to cut that number to three for last night’s game.

He says there have also been some issues with phony money.

Updated on Sunday at 7:30 p.m. with details from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services blog post. 

Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) says Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius should testify before a House committee on technical glitches surrounding Healthcare.Gov.

The House Energy and Commerce Committee sent a letter to Sebelius asking her to testify this week. She has yet to publicly respond to the request.    

kennedy22 / Flickr

Washington University is playing host this weekend to both international business leaders and academics from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IITB).

The meeting is aimed at strengthening connections around technology, innovation and education.

During the two day event, officials with both universities announced the launch of a corporate focused alliance geared toward transitioning academic discoveries into real world applications.



In our continuing coverage of the impact of the partial government shutdown, we head now to St. Louis. It's home to around 25,000 federal workers, and many of them are wondering when they'll get back to work. So too are the many small businesses that rely on those workers as customers. St. Louis Public Radio's Tim Lloyd has more.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

Even though most of the political discussion in Congress is focused on fully funding the government, last Wednesday an immigration bill was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives.

On Saturday, a more than five mile interfaith “pilgrimage” from St. Cecilia Catholic Church in south St. Louis City to St. Alphonsus “Rock” Catholic Church in mid-town was aimed at returning immigration reform to the political forefront.

The march was one of 100 similar events held across the country.

(Bill Greenblatt, UPI)

 Updated 3:35 p.m.

The government shutdown will affect thousands of federal employees in the St. Louis area. But most of them were expected to show up for work today.

Steve Hollis is the president of the American Federation of Government Employees Local 3354 at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He says workers are being told just to sit and wait.

bsabarnowl / Flickr

Lawmakers from both the Missouri state Senate and House will meet on Tuesday to collect ideas on how to deal with the school transfer process.

Albrecht Dürer / Wikimedia Commons

The Archdiocese of St. Louis is urging pastors and deacons to preach this Sunday on the connection between Catholic social teachings and immigration reform.

Giovanni Madriz is Program Coordinator with the Office of Hispanic Ministry, and says the immigration reform package passed by the U.S. Senate is consistent with Catholic teachings. 

“The bottom line is that justice and mercy have to guide our approach to immigration reform," Madriz says.  "Those principles must be met, must be respected.  Comprehensive immigration reform will be just law, will be merciful.”