Véronique LaCapra

Science Reporter

Science reporter Véronique LaCapra first caught the radio bug writing commentaries for NPR affiliate WAMU in Washington, D.C. After producing her first audio documentaries at the Duke Center for Documentary Studies in N.C., she was hooked! She has done ecological research in the Brazilian Pantanal; regulated pesticides for the Environmental Protection Agency in Arlington, Va.; been a freelance writer and volunteer in South Africa; and contributed radio features to the Voice of America in Washington, D.C. She earned a Ph.D. in ecosystem ecology from the University of California in Santa Barbara, and a B.A. in environmental policy and biology from Cornell. LaCapra grew up in Cambridge, Mass., and in her mother’s home town of Auxerre, France.

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Conservation - Birds
6:00 pm
Tue October 4, 2011

New Audubon Center north of St. Louis will facilitate bird viewing along Mississippi River

The American white pelican is one of several large birds that use the Mississippi Flyway as a migration route.
(U.S. Army Corps of Engineers St. Louis District)

The Riverlands Migratory Bird Sanctuary is opening a new information center overlooking the Mississippi River in West Alton.

Riverlands program manager Charlie Deutsch of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says the 3,700-acre sanctuary attracts tens of thousands of migratory birds every year.

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ART - SCIENCE
6:30 am
Thu September 29, 2011

UMSL exhibition explores the nexus of art and science

Artist Brigham Dimick with part of “Waxworks 2,” a series of three self-portraits that include observation hives with live honeybees.
(Terry Suhre, director, UMSL Gallery 210)

There’s an unusual art exhibition going on right now on the campus of the University of Missouri–St. Louis.

The exhibition showcases three artists from the St. Louis region whose work blurs the lines between art and science.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra talked with the artists and the show’s curator, and produced this sound portrait of the exhibition.

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Alzheimer's Disease
5:30 am
Mon September 26, 2011

Changes in marker for Alzheimer's linked to sleep cycle

Micrograph of amyloid beta plaques in the brain, as may be seen in Alzheimer disease.
(Via Wikimedia Commons user Nephron)

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have shown a relationship between daily sleep patterns and a protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

The researchers found that levels of the beta amyloid protein in spinal fluid increased during waking hours and decreased during sleep.

Wash U neurologist Randall Bateman says that pattern was strongest in young, healthy test subjects. It lessened in people over sixty, and disappeared altogether in Alzheimer’s patients.

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Saint Louis Zoo - Conservation
9:33 am
Fri September 23, 2011

Baby elephant makes public debut at Saint Louis Zoo

Kenzi takes her first swim with her mother Rani on September 9, 2011
(Photo courtesy of Becky Heisler/Saint Louis Zoo)

The Asian elephant calf Kenzi is making her public debut this morning at the Saint Louis Zoo.

The three-month-old calf will be on view at the "River's Edge" habitat from 10 a.m. to noon and then again from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. today through Sunday.

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Air pollution - ozone
3:50 pm
Thu September 22, 2011

Report ranks St. Louis 10th smoggiest U.S. city

A September 2011 Environment Missouri report on smog pollution ranks St. Louis air quality among the worst in the nation.

A new report released today by the advocacy group Environment Missouri ranks St. Louis as the 10th smoggiest metropolitan area in the country.

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Metro East - Pollution
5:28 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

Metro East: demolition of former Chemetco copper smelter moves forward

Removing one of the large manifolds from the roof of the foundry building at the former Chemetco secondary copper smelter.
(Photo courtesy of Illinois EPA)

Demolition of the former Chemetco copper smelter took another step forward on Tuesday. The demolition is the start of a long clean-up process for the hazardous Metro East eyesore.

The Illinois EPA is overseeing the dismantling of the smelter buildings, which began last year.

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Sept. 11: a decade later
8:50 am
Fri September 9, 2011

Missouri World Trade Center responders still at risk for health problems

In the wake of the 9/11 attacks, more than 50,000 rescue and recovery workers converged at the World Trade Center. Among them were the 62 members of Missouri’s FEMA Urban Search and Rescue task force.

The experience at ground zero made many workers sick, with health problems ranging from asthma to post-traumatic stress disorder.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra has this report about how the members of Missouri’s rescue team are doing.

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Sept. 11: a decade later
6:35 am
Tue September 6, 2011

Wash U: research against bioterrorism progressing, ten years after 9/11

U.S. Navy personnel take samples from a mock anthrax pile during a Chemical, Biological, Radiological (CBR) decontamination drill aboard an aircraft carrier in the Persian Gulf in 2007.
(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Kyle Steckler)

Soon after the terrorist attacks of 9/11, letters laced with anthrax started appearing in the U.S. mail, killing five people and sickening 17 others.

The incidents triggered a surge in research dedicated to preventing future bioterrorism attacks.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra spoke with Washington University virologist David Wang about his research on emerging infectious diseases, and how his work is helping to combat bioterrorism.

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Immunization / Children's Health
3:46 pm
Thu September 1, 2011

Mo. jumps 11 spots in toddler immunization rankings

(via Flickr/Daniel Paquet)

Missouri is doing a better job of getting toddlers vaccinated for childhood diseases.

Results of the CDC’s National Immunization Survey show Missouri rose from last in the rankings in 2009 up to 39th last year.

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Health - lead paint
11:02 am
Wed August 31, 2011

Washington University cited for lead paint violation

(Image courtesy of the Environmental Protection Agency)

The Environmental Protection Agency is fining Washington University for failing to tell tenants about lead paint hazards in some of its married student housing units. The violation will cost the university close to $28,000.

The civil settlement involves three rental apartments northeast of Washington University’s Danforth campus.

The consent agreement says that between 2008 and 2010, the university failed to tell student tenants about previous citations for lead paint violations from the City of St. Louis Health Department.

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