Wendy Todd | St. Louis Public Radio

Wendy Todd

Social Media Coordinator

Wendy Todd joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2014. She provides the social media coverage for The Listening Project, an initiative funded by a grant from the Missouri Foundation for Health that explores health, education and socioeconomic disparities in St. Louis and St. Louis County. She began her media career in New York as a blogger, freelance writer and social media professional. A graduate of University of California in Santa Barbara, her work has appeared in national and local outlets, including Ebony.com, The Huffington Post, St. Louis American, St. Louis Magazine, and Sundance Channel among others, covering culture, media and entertainment.

Chris Krehmeyer
Provided by Beyond Housing

If you ask many St. Louisans what they like about the region, many will cite that its cost of living is a big plus. Housing in St. Louis is generally believed to be affordable — but not for all.

The balls Rickie Woltman is palming are regulation size, not the small balls used in girls leagues.
Wendy Todd | St. Louis Public Radio

Rickie Woltman, a 14-year-old from St. Charles, thought it was just another day of basketball practice. She had no idea she was about to be told that ESPN has ranked her as the number one power forward and the number four overall prospect for 2019.

Mr.s Jones offers support to her neighbors.
Wendy Todd | St. Louis Public Radio

Racial disparities in education, income and health affect the prosperity of our entire region. A recent study, For the Sake of All, looks at these disparities and how we can reduce them. St. Louis Public Radio is talking with groups about needs for change and how to make improvements. Today: North Side Community School.

Je'Caryous Johnson
IMDB

Je’Caryous Johnson may not be a household name, but next to Tyler Perry, he is the most successful African-American playwright going, whose stage productions have grossed more than $100 million.

We’re listening to the conversations going on around St. Louis.

The Listening Project reaches into the community to discuss the recommendations coming out of a study known as For the Sake of All. It provides research on health, education and economic disparities between the African American and white communities in St. Louis city and county.

Maurice Quiroga of PNC Bank believes the first five years of a child's life are critical in long-term development.
PNC Bank

Early childhood programs have become a focus for those trying to improve the educational and social development of preschoolers. Finding what works has also been a key component in the attempts to lessen the achievement gap and other challenges some students in underserved communities experience later in life.

David Price outsmarted those who tried to derail his career at Monsanto.
Wendy Todd | St. Louis Public Radio

This is the third of a three-part series of essays that explore the experiences of three African Americans in corporate America.

“If you are a black person, and you chose to be great at something, choosing to pursue a leadership career in business is the hardest thing you can choose to do,”

Those are the words of David Price, who faced significant racial challenges in his career as an engineer turned corporate executive.

Laurna Godwin says education has been key to her success.
St. Louis Public Radio | Wendy Todd

This is the second of a three-part series of essays that explore the experiences of three African Americans in corporate America.

Laurna Godwin is the co-founder and co-owner of Vector Communications, a public engagement, communications agency. She wasn’t always a business owner. She transitioned into that role after spending nearly 20 years in broadcast journalism. 

Instead of focusing on race in the workplace, Gene R. Todd believes one’s energy is better spent on being better than the competition.
St. Louis Public Radio | Wendy Todd

This is the first of a three-part series of personal essays exploring the experiences of three African Americans in corporate America.

For many, being black in corporate America is akin to playing professional football in the mud ... with no helmet ... wearing Keds.

It can be a head-spinning experience, rife with racial and political pitfalls that center around one thing that cannot be changed: race. These racial issues can impact a person’s career trajectory, earning potential and overall security of one’s life.

(Courtesy Photo / Used With Permission)

Cedric Antonio Kyles, better known as Cedric “The Entertainer,” spent several of his formative years in St. Louis.

He was born in Jefferson City and moved to Berkeley, in north St. Louis County, after junior high school.

Kyles got his start in comedy by working in clubs in the St. Louis area and his career took off when he appeared on “It's Showtime at the Apollo,” a show he would eventually host. He also performed on “Def Comedy Jam.” His first acting role was on “The Steve Harvey Show” as the lovable P.E. teacher and Harvey’s sidekick, Cedric.