William H. Freivogel

William H. Freivogel is director of the School of Journalism at Southern Illinois University Carbondale and a professor at the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute. Previously, he worked for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch for 34 years, serving as assistant Washington Bureau Chief and deputy editorial editor. He covered the U.S. Supreme Court while in Washington. He is a graduate of Kirkwood High School, Stanford University and Washington University Law School. He is a member of the Missouri Bar.

First Amendment and Ferguson
1:15 pm
Thu August 14, 2014

Police Force And First Amendment Trespasses In The Ferguson Protests

Credit Bill Greenblatt | UPI / UPI

Police appear to be violating the First Amendment rights of protesters and journalists in Ferguson by arresting and targeting journalists, and by turning the right to assembly into a daytime-only right, according to legal experts. 

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Contraception
10:33 am
Tue July 1, 2014

Hobby Lobby Decision Says Corporations Have Religious Freedom; Local Cases Seek More

Credit (Photo credit: supremecourt.gov)

Update: U.S. district court grants St. Louis Archdiocese an injunction from enforcement of the mandate to provide contraceptive coverage, even with the existing religious accommodation.

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What is a state employee?
6:27 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Case Striking Illinois Requirement That Home-Health Workers Pay Dues May Only Apply In That State

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan criticized the court ruling.
Credit Wikipedia | government photo

In a case from Illinois that may not reach outside that state, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Pamela Harris, whose child’s disabilities required that he have around-the-clock care. She became his home health worker and objected to having to pay union dues that she thought reduced the amount of money she had to care for her child.

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Appointments, buffer zones
11:38 am
Mon June 30, 2014

Analysis: Supreme Court Unanimous Decisions Do Not Equal Agreement

Credit Matt H. Wade | Wikipedia

The era of unanimity on the U.S. Supreme Court lasted about four days.

When the U.S. Supreme Court issued three important decisions last week with unanimous votes, a flurry of legal and media commentary talked about Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. having engineered a new era of consensus on the court, with nearly two-thirds of this year's decisions decided without a dissent. Some contended that this new consensus court had rejected President Barack Obama's extremism and bolstered House Speaker John Boehner's threatened lawsuit against the president.

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