Metro Theater Company presents play about the orginial 'mean girls' of Salem | St. Louis Public Radio

Metro Theater Company presents play about the orginial 'mean girls' of Salem

Mar 6, 2015

In the spring of 1692, a group of young girls in Massachusetts spawned a wave of hysteria after accusing others of witchcraft. The accusations led to the Salem Witch Trials and the execution of more than a dozen people, mostly women.

Beginning Friday, Metro Theater Company and the Missouri History Museum present "Afflicted: Daughters of Salem," a play about the events that led to the Salem Witch Trials.

"Cityscape" host Steve Potter talked with Julia Flood, artistic director of Metro Theater Company, and playwright, Laurie Brooks.

Many people may be familiar with Arthur Miller’s 1953 play, “The Crucible,” concerning the Salem Witch Trials.

“The ‘Crucible’ is one of our great American plays but I was interested in the girls themselves, there’s very little known about them in history,” Brooks said. “I was interested in exploring how these girls became accusers.”

“The idea of the Salem Witch Trials really permeates the culture and continues to fascinate people,” Flood said.

The production also contains a strong educational component with resources for students and teachers.

Related Event

Metro Theater Company and the Missouri History Museum Present "Afflicted: Daughters of Salem"
March 6-22, 2015
Thursdays and Fridays at 10:00 a.m.
Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.
Sundays at 2:00 p.m.
Missouri History Museum's Lee Auditorium
(314) 932-7414

Website: Metro Theater Company Website

“Cityscape” is produced by Mary Edwards and Alex Heuer and sponsored in part by the Missouri Arts Council, the Regional Arts Commission, and the Arts and Education Council of Greater St. Louis.