Cityscape

Airs Fridays noon-1 p.m. and 10-11 p.m. (repeat)

Join Steve Potter every Friday for a discussion of local arts and cultural events.

Subscribe to our e-newsletter, The Talk Studio, to receive previews of upcoming guests, highlights from the most-talked about shows, and questions from our producers.

Cityscape is produced by Mary Edwards and Alex Heuer. The show is sponsored in part by the Missouri Arts Council, the Regional Arts Commission, and the Arts and Education Council of Greater St. Louis.

Amoco Painting
John Salozzo

Artist John Salozzo is known for making paintings that resemble real life photographs. Two years into his latest project, “St. Louis Icons,” he has completed 12 realistic board and canvas paintings of different St. Louis icons, including the Goody Goody Diner, Blueberry Hill, Ted Drewes and The Tivoli Theatre. The project is a 10-year effort that will consist of 40 to 50 total images.

An exhibit of “St. Louis Icons” is on display at Third Degree Glass Factory through July 18.

Mike Isaacson
The MUNY

On June 15, The Muny kicked-off its 97th season with “My Fair Lady.” Scheduled this season are three premiere productions along with returning favorites such as “Hairspray.”

On Friday’s “Cityscape,” Mike Isaacson, artistic director and executive producer of The Muny, joined host Steve Potter to discuss this season’s productions. Isaacson also had a hand in producing the Broadway musical “Fun Home,” which received five Tony Awards.  

So, what goes into lining up The Muny’s season?

Arlene Zarembka and Zuleyma Tang-Martinez got married in Canada in 2005.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

In a resounding victory for the rights of same-sex couples, the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday ruled that the U.S. Constitution requires states to issue marriage licenses to those couples.

The organ has been deemed by some as the “king of instruments.” But regardless of what it’s called, the organ will definitely reign supreme in St. Louis next week when the American Guild of Organists (AGO) holds its 2015 North Central Regional Convention in churches and concert halls throughout the metropolitan area.

George Davis, left; Eric Person, right
Alex Heuer

On June 19, for one night only, The Jazz Edge Big Band along with a special guest will pay tribute to St. Louis’ eight most influential saxophonists in their concert entitled “Tribute to St. Louis Saxophonists.”

Among those honored will be Oliver Nelson, Jimmy Forrest and David Sanborn.

On Friday, George Davis, co-founder of The Jazz Edge Big Band and board member of The Jazz Edge, Inc., and Eric Person, saxophonist, joined “Cityscape” host Steve Potter to discuss the event.

Vince Valenza, owner of Blues City Deli
Sauce Magazine

The restaurant business is known for having small profit margins. It’s competitive and sometimes it’s the small things that make the difference between a successful restaurant and one that’s not.

Ken Howard

Although Tobias Picker’s “Emmeline” received great accolades for its Santa Fe Opera premiere in 1996 and again in 1998 when that production was staged at the New York City Opera, it hasn’t been mounted since. But that will change on June 13 when Opera Theatre of Saint Louis opens its production of the American saga.

Used with permission

On June 16, Cortango Orquesta, will host an album release concert for the release of their first album, Tandas. Founded by Cally Banham, the six-member band Cortango describes itself as a “dance band performing tango music with a symphonic twist.”

“I started the group with the intent of creating an ideal experience for social dancing,” Banham said. “We started by playing more traditional, steady tangos. [Now], we like to present some pieces that are concert-like in nature and also play for dancers.”

St. Lou Fringe Festival Left, Em Piro; Middle, Alicen Moser; Right, Joe Hanrahan
Alex Heuer

Four years ago, St. Lou Fringe set out on a “passion project” to create an event that provided a networking platform for emerging artists to gain exposure. The project became known as the “St. Lou Fringe Festival,” which includes 10 days of performances from a diverse variety of art forms, including slam poetry, magic, fashion design and street performance. The overall goal of the organization is to promote St. Louis as a “hotspot for cultural and economic vitality” through arts culture.

In the mid-1970s a new theater group put on its first show in the then empty Union Station and changed the theater scene in St. Louis forever. The group was Theatre Project Company and its co-founder was Fontaine Syer.

Syer died of cancer on May 29 in Bloomington, Ind. where she had made her home since joining the faculty of Indiana University in 2005. Although she had been gone from St. Louis for many years, a host of actors, directors and theater managers credit her with inspiring the wide variety of small professional theater companies in St. Louis today.

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