Cityscape

Airs Fridays noon-1 p.m. and 10-11 p.m. (repeat)

Join Steve Potter every Friday for a discussion of local arts and cultural events.

Subscribe to our e-newsletter, The Talk Studio, to receive previews of upcoming guests, highlights from the most-talked about shows, and questions from our producers.

Cityscape is produced by Mary Edwards and Alex Heuer. Our online producer is Erica Smith. The show is sponsored in part by the Missouri Arts Council, the Regional Arts Commission, and the Arts and Education Council of Greater St. Louis.

Clark Terry
Clark Terry's website

In April 2006, jazz trumpeter and St. Louis native Clark Terry talked to "Cityscape" host Steve Potter about his upcoming performance at the Greater St. Louis Jazz Festival.

By then, Clark was widely regarded as a legend. He was a star soloist with Count Basie's and Duke Ellington's bands, led his own big band, and was the first black man to play in "The Tonight Show" house band.

King penguins will lead the Saint Louis Zoo parade to the new penguin habitat on March 5, 2015.
Robin Winkelman / Saint Louis Zoo

They’re back! The Saint Louis Zoo’s Penguin and Puffin Coast reopens Thursday to the public.

To kick off the celebration, a parade of king and gentoo penguins will lead the way to the exhibit at 10:30 a.m. Thursday. The penguin exhibit closed in September 2013 for construction of a new polar bear exhibit that is next to the penguin habitat. The polar bear exhibit will open this summer.

Security man Steve Wilkos, played by Matt Hill, holds back the Springer studio audience in New Line Theatre's "Jerry Springer: The Opera."
Jill Ritter Lindberg / New Line Theater

"Jerry Springer: The Opera" is promoted as "very adult." It's so adult that we can't find a clip suitable for radio. 

"Jerry Springer: The Opera" opened in 2003 in London. The first U.S. performance was in Las Vegas in 2007. Now the New Line Theatre is bringing the opera to St. Louis in March.

Clark Terry
Facebook | with permission

St. Louis jazz trumpeter Clark Terry made his first trumpet. His neighbors quickly got tired of listening to the racket, and raised money to buy the 10-year-old a real instrument.

Terry became a legend: He was a star soloist with the Count Basie Orchestra and Duke Ellington Orchestra; he led his own big band; and he was the first black man to play in “The Tonight Show” house band. Terry died Saturday; he was 94.

Country and bluegrass artist Ricky Skaggs will perform in St. Louis on Feb. 28, 2015.
Skaggs Family Records

Ricky Skaggs started playing the mandolin in the hills of Kentucky at age 5. Fifty-five years later, he’s still in love with what he calls “old-time mountain music.”

“That real traditional thread running through the fabric of the music scene, I’ve always been drawn to that,” Skaggs told “Cityscape” guest host Jim Althoff. “I’ve always felt, too, that if that particular thread ever gets pulled out, I think the whole piece of cloth can just unravel. It’s a very important part of what we need desperately to hold on to and honor.”

George Caleb Bingham painted 'The Jolly Flatboatmen' in 1846. The oil-on-canvas painting is part of the St. Louis Art Museum's Bingham exhibit.
Courtesy of the St. Louis Art Museum

A new exhibit at the St. Louis Art Museum tackles the personal interests of a Missouri painter known for his depictions of 19th century elections and politics.

“They are the most spectacular paintings he did,” said Melissa Wolfe, the new curator of American art at the museum.

Elizabeth Futral as Alice B. Toklas and Stephanie Blythe as Gertrude Stein
Ken Howard | OTSL

Opera Theatre of St. Louis’s “27” is the work of two men obsessed.

“I burrowed myself into a hole and completely allowed the life of Gertrude Stein to wash over me and to become part of my chemistry,” “27” librettist Royce Vavrek said on “Cityscape.”

Artist Andy Long's work at Missouri Artists on Main on Main Street in Old St. Charles
Beatrice Dissett

George Caleb Bingham is regarded as one of the greatest American painters of the 19th century. The St. Louis Art Museum will open an exhibit Sunday featuring Bingham’s paintings and drawings of life along the Missouri and Mississippi rivers.

In 1975, when the St. Louis Mercantile Library was considering selling its Bingham works, Missourians came together to purchase the collection on behalf of the people of the state for $1.8 million.

David Choi demonstrates the grill for Steve Potter and Ligaya Figueras on Feb. 3, 2015, at Seoul Q in St. Louis.
Katie Cook / St. Louis Public Radio

It all started in the kitchen of David Choi’s grandma. It was there that Choi fell in love with the flavors of Korean barbecue and the communal act of eating together, and got the idea for Seoul Taco. Choi's Korean-Mexican fusion food truck hit the streets in 2011 and one year later became a brick-and-mortar restaurant off the Delmar Loop.

Daniel Handler
Meredith Heuer

Go ahead; call David Handler’s work weird and bizarre. He’ll thank you.

Handler has written novels for adults as well as two series for children written under the pen name Lemony Snicket. His latest novel, “We Are Pirates,” is for adults, but it’s still quirky.

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