Airs Fridays noon-1 p.m. and 10-11 p.m. (repeat)

Join Steve Potter every Friday for a discussion of local arts and cultural events.

Subscribe to our e-newsletter, The Talk Studio, to receive previews of upcoming guests, highlights from the most-talked about shows, and questions from our producers.

Cityscape is produced by Mary Edwards, Alex Heuer, and Kelley Moffitt. The show is sponsored in part by the Missouri Arts Council, the Regional Arts Commission, and the Arts and Education Council of Greater St. Louis.

Marilynne Bradley painted over 200 watercolors of St. Louis restaurants, parks, and other landmarks.
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis has long been proud of its famous (and infamous) places: the Arch, Gaslight Square, The Fabulous Fox Theatre, Coral Court Motel. Marilynne Bradley’s “Once Upon a Time in St. Louis: An Illustrated Trip Through the Past” features 86 of those landmarks, painted in watercolor and accompanied by their histories.

Cast members of Insight Theatre Company's production of "Spinning Into Butter."
(Courtesy of Insight Theatre Company)

In line with its mission to “reveal the complexity of the human spirit,” Insight Theatre Company concludes its season with “Spinning Into Butter,” a performance exploring blatant and latent racism in university culture.

Clay Hilley as Siegfried, Alexandra LoBianco as Brünnhilde
John Lamb | Union Avenue Opera

Union Avenue Opera (UAO) concludes its 21st season along with its four-year production of Wagner’s ‘Ring cycle’ with the final opera in the series, “Götterdämmerung.”

Ligaya Figueras, executive editor at Sauce magazine, joined "Cityscape" for her last Sound Bites segment.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

For 14 years, Sauce magazine has provided St. Louis readers with food news, tested recipes, and reviews of the best places to shop, drink, and dine.

Working first as a freelancer, Ligaya Figueras was first published in Sauce in January 2008. She then became a staff writer—and finally, the magazine’s executive editor. In that position, she joined “Cityscape” many times for the show’s monthly Sound Bites segment, in which she explored St. Louis dining with the people who know it best.

Cary Horton (Courtesy of Missouri History Museum)


Children learn differently than adults—there’s no studying, no note-taking, and not a lot of deep reasoning. There’s mostly just play.

With that in mind, the Missouri History Museum’s History Clubhouse, its first permanent exhibit specifically designed for children, opened in June. History Clubhouse is an explorative space in which kids can discover St. Louis-area places of note: Downtown, Cahokia Mounds, Forest Park, and the Mississippi River.

(Courtesy of Sauce magazine)


What does it mean to become a restaurant regular? It could be your order, sent to the kitchen as soon as you walk in; it could be your favorite cocktail, waiting for you at 6 on Thursday evenings; maybe it’s just a friendly ‘hello’ and the occasional free pastry when you enter the neighborhood coffee shop.

Sara Sitzer, artistic director, Gesher Music Festival.
(Courtesy Gesher Music Festival)

“Gesher” is the Hebrew word for ‘bridge’ or ‘connection,’ said Sara Sitzer, artistic director of the festival: connections between musical styles, St. Louis and the larger artistic community, and across cultures.

at the post office s. grand 11.26
Rebecca Smith | St. Louis Public Radio

After the death of Michael Brown, artists—of the St. Louis region and nationwide—quickly began examining and commemorating their confusion and pain.

St. Louis Public Radio arts reporters Nancy Fowler and Willis Ryder Arnold joined “St. Louis on the Air” to talk about artists’ responses to Ferguson and the links between art and activism that have helped drive the movement.

Spellbound! A Musical Fable premieres at the Stray Dog Theatre August 6.
(Courtesy of Stray Dog Theatre)

Told through a mash-up of fairy tales and fables, Spellbound! A Musical Fable details one woman’s quest for self-acceptance and strength—and its world premiere is August 6 here in St. Louis.

Gary Bell and Robert White joined “Cityscape” to talk about the history and production of Spellbound! on Friday.

Author Jeff Lindsay
Hilary Hemingway

If you’re one of the thousands of die-hard fans of Dexter Morgan, vigilante serial killer, you may not be familiar with Jeff Lindsay; but you nevertheless owe him quite a lot.

Lindsay is the author of the original books from which the immensely popular Showtime series “Dexter” are based, and the creator of the series’ anti-hero. He spoke on “Cityscape” about Dexter’s final book, “Dexter Is Dead,” and about his experience as the author of its murderous but oddly beloved main character.

Áine O'Connor

When mentioning author and philanthropist Cynthia Kagan Frohlichstein, the best word that comes to mind is “spunk.” You can spot her around town at different events, chatting and mingling, owning the crowd.

And frankly, she has much to celebrate.

Celebrating her 40th year of being cancer-free, Frohlichstein has not slowed down her attempts at showing the world that giving is as good as receiving. She’s written children’s books on the topic of “giving back” and life lessons in hopes that young people will carry the torch forward.

Bob Kramer Marionnettes
Alex Heuer

Over fifty years ago, a St. Louis-based company set out to keep age-old children’s stories alive, literally.

Bob Kramer’s Marionnettes” serves as one of the longest running puppetry theatres in the United States. Combining humor with storytelling, Kramer’s production pieces come to life to provide entertainment for audiences of all ages.

Kathryn Nahorski, Executive Director, St. Louis Artists' Guild
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

On the brink of its 130th anniversary, The Artists’ Guild, St. Louis’ longest running art organization, relocated to the old Famous-Barr building in downtown Clayton from its old Oak Knoll Park location.

Just a few weeks after the move, executive director Kathryn Nahorski has exciting plans for the organization.

The Sheldon

The Cabaret Project of St. Louis will host its annual St. Louis Cabaret Festival from July 22-25 at the Sheldon Concert Hall and for one night at the Kranzberg Arts Center. The festival will feature three musical artists, including Tony-award winning singer Marilyn Maye, who will perform during the event’s opening night celebration.

Maye is scheduled to showcase her rendition of Frank Sinatra’s songs entitled “Sinatra – Her Way.” She has only performed the piece in a select few cities outside of New York.

Katie's Pizza
Sauce Magazine

Enjoying a beer, cocktail or glass of wine at the end of the workday – at a discounted price – is the epitome of a happy hour.

Our monthly Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine seeks to answer the question: Where are the best happy hours in the St. Louis area?

And, the magazine considered several “best of” happy hour categories including wine, beer, cocktails, day drinking, al fresco drinking, pitchers and ambiance.

The selection process was based on four qualities:

Courtesy of Dale Sweet

Beginning July 19, Cinema St. Louis will hold its annual St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase featuring works created by St. Louis artists and films with strong local ties.

The four-day event includes 88 films ranging from full-length fiction features to documentaries and multi-film compilations of fiction. Screenings for all films will take place at the Tivoli Theatre.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

On Friday, “Cityscape” host Steve Potter led a discussion about the life and career of jazz pianist Ray Kennedy who died on May 28 after a long battle with Multiple Sclerosis.

Born to a musical family in Maplewood, Kennedy began his career in St. Louis before moving to New York. He is perhaps best known as the pianist/arranger for the John Pizzarelli Trio.

Max & Louie Productions presents "The Killing of Sister George." Left, Shannon Nara; Right, Lavonne Byers

Max and Louie Productions will kick off its 5th season with the dark comedy “The Killing of Sister George.” Written by Frank Marcus, the play was named Best Play of the 1965-66 Season by The Theatre Critics Variety Poll.

“The Killing of Sister George” is viewed as a groundbreaking production. Highlighting a lesbian relationship, the initial 1965 production shocked audiences in Britain and it received an “X” rating because of its content.  

President George W. Bush awards the Presidential Medal of Freedom to author Harper Lee during a ceremony Monday, Nov. 5, 2007, in the East Room.
White House photo by Eric Draper / Public Domain

“To Kill a Mockingbird” cemented Harper Lee’s place in the list of classic authors of American literature almost as soon as it was published in 1960. “Mockingbird,” with its frank and poignant handling of race and discrimination in the U.S. South, electrified a nation as the Civil Rights Movement swelled in power. Fifty years later, Lee’s new book “Go Set a Watchman” stands to accompany a similarly meaningful time for civil rights and social justice.

Courtesy Union Avenue Opera

Union Avenue Opera opens its 21st festival season on July 10 with Mozart’s “Don Giovanni.” When “Cityscape" host Steve Potter pointed out that age 21 in people usually indicates adulthood, UAO Artistic Director Scott Schoonover responded, “We have actually played around with that imagery, thinking about coming into our own at 21. We actually have a pretty serious season this year … a bit heavier in that sense. I think people will still enjoy it and get a lot out of it, but coming into our own, yes.”