Airs Fridays noon-1 p.m. and 10-11 p.m. (repeat)

Join Steve Potter every Friday for a discussion of local arts and cultural events.

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Cityscape is produced by Mary Edwards, Alex Heuer, and Kelly Moffitt. The show is sponsored in part by the Missouri Arts Council, the Regional Arts Commission, and the Arts and Education Council of Greater St. Louis.

Michael Lindner
Courtesy of Michael Lindner

For more than 70 years, the National Society of Arts and Letters has sponsored local and national competitions for young artists. This year, the national competition will be in St. Louis.

“(The) organization fosters young people in the arts, bringing them together in their field and providing opportunities for them to compete,” said Peggy Liggett, chairwoman of the competition committee of the St. Louis chapter. “We have some prizes that are very significant.”

St. Louis Low Brass Collective

Low brass is underappreciated. The St. Louis Low Brass Collective wants to change.

“Our goal is to improve the music performance level by offering opportunities for people to play, giving concerts (and) workshops,” B.J. Fullenkamp, a trombonist with Missouri Baptist University and St. Louis Cathedral Brass, told “CityScape” host Steve Potter.

The St. Louis Classical Guitar Society wants to help the Ferguson healing process, one guitar at a time.

Through grants, the Ferguson Guitar Initiative is donating guitars and lessons to fifth- and sixth-grade students in the Normandy and Ferguson-Florissant school districts starting next week.

Anderson Matthews, as Matt Drayton, and Richard Prioleau, as John Prentice Jr., perform in The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis' 'Guess Who's Coming to Dinner.'
Jerry Naunheim Jr. / The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

There are a lot of similarities between “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” the movie and “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” the play.

“The iconic moments are all there,” said Seth Gordon, associate artistic director of The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis.

It’s still an interracial love story. It’s still set in the 1960s. The play, adapted for the stage in 2012 by playwright Todd Kreidler, includes many of the movie’s memorable moments and monologues. But there also are some differences.

St. Louis Public Radio arts and culture reporter Willis Ryder Arnold had not spent time in St. Louis before starting his job in August, but already the region has made an impression.

“It’s an interesting place. It’s got a lot going on, and a lot it needs to work out, I think,” Arnold told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday. “There’s a lot of creativity here, and a lot of creative people. People are just very connected to each other here.”

Arnold moved to St. Louis from New York.

Courtesy of The Midnight Company

Among the tales of quiet desperation, there’s “Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll” written more than 20 years ago by Eric Bogosian.

“He speaks to my generation,” actor Joe Hanrahan told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday. “He grew up at the same time. He speaks, especially in this show, to the rock and roll life. To the pleasures it offers and the pitfalls. To him, it represents America: Both the things that we think of ourselves and the things that we do.”

Storyteller Bobby Norfolk's 'Take the A Train' opens Jan. 10, 2015.
Courtesy of Bobby Norfolk

It’s said that the arts can heal. Storyteller Bobby Norfolk is working on finding out if it’s true with Ferguson.

Norfolk is collaborating with producer Beverly Brennan on a yearlong series highlighting the talents of black and white performing artists starting with “Take the ‘A’ Train,” a tour of the Harlem Renaissance.

Wednesday's First Night celebration in Grand Center is the official end of St. Louis' yearlong 250th anniversary celebration, and will showcase St. Louis arts and artists. 

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis’ yearlong 250th anniversary celebration will close Wednesday night with First Night in Grand Center.

As part of the festivities, a few STL250 cakes began arriving at the Public Media Commons on Monday morning. The Public Media Commons is located between St. Louis Public Radio and the Nine Network on Olive Street.

Sauce Magazine executive editor Ligaya Figueras called the cheeseburger at Death in the Afternoon in St. Louis one of her most memorable meals of 2014.
Carmen Troesser / Sauce Magazine

Looking back on 2014, Sauce Magazine's editor and restaurant critics shared their favorite new restaurants, meals and drinks.

Best New Restaurants

Restaurant critic Michael Renner picked Peacemaker Lobster and Crab. Chef-owner Kevin Nashan imports fresh seafood daily. "He's brining in Maryland crabs. He's bringing in Maine lobster," Renner told "Cityscape" host Steve Potter.

Restaurant critic Matt Berkley chose Planter's House.

Two looks of Raja
Provided by the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts

As our city rocked from the upheavals of 2014, a series of quieter changes was taking place in the St. Louis art world.

Several arts organizations debuted, others expanded and a few folded. Some relocated and others featured uncharacteristic fare to appeal to wider audiences. Here’s a look at eight of this year’s evolutions in the local arts scene.

Bill Greenblatt / UPI

After creating a list of 100 essential songs about St. Louis, Riverfront Times senior music writers Christian Schaeffer and Roy Kasten are working their way through the top 12 holiday songs by St. Louisians.

Kris Bueltmann

The Bach Society of Saint Louis continues its Christmas concert tradition on Tuesday, complete with a candlelight procession.

“Every time I maybe mention the Bach Society and their Christmas candlelight concert that they are performing, anybody I speak with will go, ‘Oh! Oh!’ and they kind of stop in their tracks because they do remember that procession,” soprano Jane Jennings said. “It’s riveting. It’s breathtaking.”

The candlelight procession will be after intermission.

See 'A Christmas Story — The Musical' through Jan. 4, 2015, at the Fabulous Fox Theatre in St. Louis.
Fabulous Fox Theatre

Maria Knasel got her start at The Muny. Now the 13-year-old singer, dancer and actress is part of the Broadway tour of “A Christmas Story — The Musical.”

Want to rock out to holiday music while supporting a local charity? Easy.

At Home(s) for the Holidays, concertgoers donate the cost of their ticket to one of four local charities.

The Saint Louis Ballet's 'Nutcracker' features the professional company and students from the St. Louis Ballet School.
Saint Louis Ballet

“The Nutcracker” has become a holiday tradition, and is performed by countless ballet companies around the world.

“‘Nutracker,’ for ballet companies, is kind of our Super Bowl,” said Saint Louis Ballet dancer Stephen Lawrence, who plays the Cavalier in the company’s production of “The Nutcracker.”

Michael Castro
Ros Crenshaw

Updated to include Michael Castro's poetry and interview audio, and reaction from poet Shirley Bradford LeFlore.

Except for dotting the “i’s” and crossing a “t” or two, St. Louis has its first official poet.

HotCity Theatre's 'Reality'
HotCity Theatre

The HotCity Theatre will close with a bit of "Reality."

“Reality” by playwright Lia Romeo is a dark comedy that goes behind the scenes of the reality TV show “Looking for Love.” The play opens with a proposal, then the reality show cast is secreted away for several weeks while the rest of the world catches up with the show, one episode at a time.

Eugenia Alexander, left, and Edna Patterson-Petty
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Public Radio

Grandmas are moms with lots of frosting, the saying goes. And in the case of East St. Louis’ Edna Patterson-Petty and her granddaughter Eugenia Alexander, the frosting is artistically done.

Patterson-Petty is a fiber artist and art therapist. Alexander grew up enamored by her grandmother’s work, which includes an art quilt made for President Barack Obama’s 2009 inauguration.

Country singer Garth Brooks performs on Dec. 4, 2014, at the Scottrade Center in St. Louis.
Bill Greenblatt / UPI

There’s a new ghost in the machine, and country music legend Garth Brooks hopes it will give more control to musicians.

GhostTunes offers digital songs, similar to iTunes.