Here and Now

Monday - Friday, 2-3 p.m.

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A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Mon May 26, 2014

In Arizona, Shipping Aluminum Cans Out-Of-State Is Big Business

Aluminum beverage cans on the tables are to be sorted and prepped to be shipped out of Arizona. (Alexandra Olgin/KJZZ News)

In a memorable episode of “Seinfeld,” Kramer and Newman fill up Newman’s mail truck with bottles and cans collected in New York and head for Michigan — where the return deposit is a nickel higher.

Well, unlike Michigan, Arizona doesn’t have a return deposit for containers — but that doesn’t mean its bottles and cans aren’t worth something, somewhere.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, KJZZ’s Alexandra Olgin reports.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Mon May 26, 2014

A Father's Labor Of Love Sparks A Tradition And A Hit Song

Paul Monti started the event called Operation Flags for Vets to place flags on every grave at Massachusetts National Cemetery after his son was killed in Afghanistan in 2006. (Alex Ashlock/Here and Now)

 

The tradition of setting aside a day to honor the nation’s war dead started after the Civil War. It was called Decoration Day then and on the first one in 1868 people decorated the graves of the Union and Confederate dead at Arlington National Cemetery. Cemeteries across the country are decorated just like that today as we mark Memorial Day 2014.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Mon May 26, 2014

New Debate Over Piketty's Book On Economic Inequality

French economist Thomas Piketty, pictured here during a presentation at King's College in London on April 30, is drawing criticism and praise for his new book "Capitalism in the Twenty-First Century," in which he argues that capitalism leads to the concentration of wealth in the hands of those already rich. (Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images)

Economist Thomas Piketty is defending his book today, from charges that he got his math on rising inequality wrong.

Piketty’s nearly 600-page book, “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” has been the most hotly debated book this spring over its key conclusion: “The central contradiction of capitalism” is that it leads to the concentration of wealth in the hands of those already rich.

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Tom Rush's Rite Of Passage Song

This is the season of high school and college graduations, a time when many young people are planning to leave home. The bittersweet mood of that time is captured in “Child’s Song,” which Canadian singer-songwriter Murray McLauchlan wrote and folk and blues singer Tom Rush made famous.

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Who Is In Your Thoughts On Memorial Day?

Let us know who you are remembering on our Facebook page or in the comments.

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Washington Concertgoers Fill Nearby Hospital

The Gorge Amphitheater, a week before Sasquatch. When 25,000 people pack the Gorge, its population exceeds every other town in Grant County. (Jessica Robinson/Northwest News Network)

This weekend, rock and indie music fans from across the country make their annual pilgrimage to a corner of the Northwest’s farm country, for the annual Sasquatch Music Festival.

Over three days, 25,000 rollicking concertgoers turn the picturesque Gorge Amphitheater along the Columbia River in central Washington into the largest city in the county.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Clive Owen Gets Wordy In New Romantic Comedy

British actor Clive Owen, who stars in "Words and Pictures," is pictured here on May 20, 2013 in Cannes, France. (Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

British actor Clive Owen is known for his roles in thrillers such as “Killer Elite,” the dystopian “Children of Men” and Spike Lee’s heist drama “Inside Man.” But for his latest film, he goes into academia.

In “Words and Pictures,” Owen plays a poet turned prep school English teacher. His job is in jeopardy: he drinks too much and his teaching has become lackluster.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

California Counties Sue 5 Narcotics Makers

The prescription medicine OxyContin is displayed in 2001 at a Walgreens drugstore in Brookline, Mass. (Darren McCollester/Getty Images)

Two counties in California — Orange and Santa Clara — are suing five major drug companies, accusing them of causing the growing prescription drug epidemic across the country.

The complaint, filed on behalf of the state of California, accuses the companies, which make painkilling drugs such as Oxy­Con­tin, of deceptive marketing. The lawsuit seeks financial damages.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Americans Are Working Less, So Why Are We So Stressed Out?

Americans are working less hours overall, but among the white-collar crowd, time spent working is at a high, while leisure is at a low. (Phil Whitehouse/Flickr)

The amount of hours worked in the U.S. is considerably less than it used to be. And we’re not alone — every other advanced economy around the world is working less, too. But single parents are working more, as are the highly educated and wealthy.

Derek Thompson of The Atlantic joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss some of the reasons why it seems like we all have less leisure time.

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NPR Story
2:28 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Pennsylvania Becomes Latest Gay Marriage State

Peg Welch, center left, and her wife Delma Welch gather with others at a gay marriage rally on the steps of the state Capitol Tuesday, May 20, 2014, in Harrisburg, Pa. Pennsylvania's ban on gay marriage was overturned Tuesday by a federal judge in a decision that makes same-sex marriage legal throughout the Northeast. (Matt Rourke/AP)

Pennsylvania’s Republican Governor Tom Corbett says he won’t appeal yesterday’s ruling from a federal judge striking down a state law that banned gay marriage.

Hundreds of gay couples are rushing to get married in the state, which as of today has become the 19th state where gay marriage is legal.

On Monday, a federal judge in Oregon struck down a voter-approved ban on gay marriage and a federal judge in Utah ordered state officials to recognize more than 1,000 gay marriages performed there in the two weeks before the U.S. Supreme Court issued an emergency stay.

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