St. Louis on the Air | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis on the Air

Noon-1 p.m. and 10-11 p.m. (repeat) Monday-Friday
  • Local Host Don Marsh

St. Louis on the Air creates a unique space where guests and listeners can share ideas and opinions with respect and honesty. Whether exploring issues and challenges confronting our region, discussing the latest innovations in science and technology, taking a closer look at our history or talking with authors, artists and musicians, St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region.

St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region. St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh and producers Mary EdwardsAlex HeuerEvie Hemphill and Caitlin Lally give you the information you need to make informed decisions and stay in touch with our diverse and vibrant St. Louis region.

St. Louis on the Air is sponsored by University College at Washington University

Democratic candidate for St. Louis County executive Mark Mantovani is looking to replace incumbent Steve Stenger.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Democratic candidate for St. Louis County executive Mark Mantovani is a former businessman turned politician. His name will appear next to incumbent County Executive Steve Stenger’s on the Aug. 7 ballot for Missouri voters.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, Mantovani joined host Don Marsh, St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jo Mannies and listeners to discuss his campaign for county executive.

Florissant resident Cori Bush is an ordained pastor and registered nurse – and is currently running to become a congresswoman.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, Cori Bush joined host Don Marsh to discuss her campaign for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jason Rosenbaum also participated in the conversation.

Bush, who lives in Florissant, is challenging incumbent Rep. Lacy Clay (D-University City) in Missouri’s 1st Congressional District. Both Bush and Clay’s names will appear on next week’s Democratic primary ballot.

Bush fielded a wide variety of questions from Marsh, Rosenbaum and listeners during the show. Here are 10 of those exchanges.

Mow to Own
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

Vacant properties are abundant in St. Louis. But one local millennial is on a mission to reduce that number.

“Eltorean [Hawkins] is a young twenty-something who grew up in the Walnut Park neighborhood, and he’s just decided to take it upon himself,” Kameel Stanley said on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

Lomo Soltado is a Peruvian beef tenderloin stir fry available at Mango Peruvian Cuisine in downtown St. Louis.
Carmen Troesser | Sauce Magazine

“[Peru has] an incredibly diverse cuisine, and not just because of the geography of the region, but also because of the immigrant culture and colonization history that Peru has,” Catherine Klene said on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air. “It’s a really excellent mix of flavors and cuisines.”

From Incan staples like corn and ancient grains to varieties of peppers and potatoes, Peruvian food has been also influenced by regions including Europe, Asia and Africa, according to Klene, the digital managing editor at Sauce Magazine.

Left, Bill Freivogel, Blake Strode and Dan Epps participated in the Legal Roundtable discussion on Tuesday's St. Louis on the Air.
Kelly Moffitt and Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Last week, news broke that two St. Louisans were denied housing in a senior community because of their sexual orientation. Now the case is headed to the U.S. District Court.

Floodwaters climb up the steps in front of the Gateway Arch during the Great Flood of 1993.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

On Aug. 1, 1993, the Mississippi River crested at 49.58 feet in St. Louis, nearly 20 feet above flood stage, breaking previous records. At the flood’s peak, more than a million cubic feet of water passed the Gateway Arch each second.

In west St. Louis County, the entire Chesterfield valley, then known as Gumbo Flats, was under water as the Missouri River overflowed its levees. On the east side of the Mississippi, the entire town of Valmeyer, Illinois, was destroyed, and rather than rebuilding, the citizens moved to a new location.

As a result of the Great Flood of ’93, residents were evacuated, homes and businesses were lost, and people all over the region joined in the sandbagging efforts to prevent further devastation.

Joining Friday’s show via phone, state Sen. Bob Onder (R-Lake Saint Louis), at left, spoke in favor of Proposition A. Jack Cardetti, who was in studio for the conversation, spoke in opposition.
Courtesy of Bob Onder & St. Louis Public Radio

“Do the people of the state of Missouri want to adopt Senate Bill 19 ("Right-to-Work") … ?”

So begins Proposition A, which if passed would make Missouri the 28th right-to-work state in the country, prohibiting labor organizations from mandating union membership or union fees as a condition of employment.

Voters will decide the hotly contested matter during the Aug. 7 primary election. On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh examined both sides of the ballot issue.

President Donald Trump speaks at a Granite City Works warehouse on July 26, 2018.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated July 27 at 2:37 p.m. - STLPR journalist Jason Rosenbaum joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to provide further analysis and a behind-the-scenes look at the president's visit.

Original story from July 26:

President Donald Trump offered up a passionate defense of his trade policy during a visit Thursday to Granite City, and predicted that Friday’s economic numbers will back him up.

“The days of plundering American jobs and wealth, those days are over,’’ Trump said, touching off cheers from an enthusiastic crowd of about 500 invited guests gathered in a warehouse that’s part of a steel mill complex being reopened by US Steel.

Entertainer Jenifer Lewis will be in St. Louis Saturday, July 28, promoting her book "The Mother of Black Hollywood: A Memoir."
Courtesy of Julia Walker

She’s been dubbed the “Mother of Black Hollywood” for playing a number of maternal characters in film and on TV screens for more than two decades. From “Fresh Prince of Bel Air” and “Poetic Justice” to “Cast Away” and more recently “Black-ish,” Jenifer Lewis has made herself a well-known name in American households.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with the St. Louis native about her career highlights that have led to the release of “The Mother of Black Hollywood: A Memoir.”

“I gave my entire heart and soul,” Lewis said about writing the book. “I have never known how to half-ass do anything. I do it with 2,000 percent, now mind you, that could’ve bounced off the bipolar mania, but some parts of that, it worked for me.”

Dail Chambers, Jenna Budreau and Marissa Southards discussed how body image is influenced by social media on Thursday’s “St. Louis on the Air.”
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

As social media becomes increasingly pervasive in our society, so does the notion that our bodies are not what they should be. While such platforms are only one factor that influences body image, a study by Common Sense Media found that more than one in four teens on social media stress about how they look when they post a picture online. 

St. Louis-area kidney donor Jane Beckman (center) shared her recent experience giving one of her organs to another person alongside leading nephrologist Krista Lentine (at left) and SSM Saint Louis University Hospital’s transplant coordinator, Cody Wooley
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Back in January of this year, St. Louis-area resident Jane Beckman came across a newspaper article about a man in need of a new kidney – and another man who came to his aid.

“I could do that,” Beckman thought to herself. And soon, she did. At the end of May 2018, she donated her left kidney “to a complete stranger.”

The Cortex MetroLink Station is the 38th station to come to fruition within the light-rail system, which first began service in 1993. The grand opening is set for 10 a.m. Tuesday, July 31.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

MetroLink riders along the central corridor will soon have a new spot to hop aboard both red- and blue-line trains.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed what the new Cortex MetroLink Station and other plans in the works could mean for the future of transit in the region.

Joining him to talk about it were Jessica Mefford-Miller, interim executive director of Metro Transit, and June McAllister Fowler, the newly announced board chair for Citizens for Modern Transit.

Cultural Leadership’s 12th class surrounds a vandalized historic marker commemorating Emmett Till in Money, Mississippi, in 2017.
Cultural Leadership

In 1955, Emmett Till, a black teenager from Chicago, was murdered after whistling at a white woman in Mississippi. Though court proceedings took place, no one was convicted of the crime. However, the U.S.

Left, Sarah “Bricktator” Arnosky and Brooke “Vicious van Gogo” Clark are the co-captains of Arch Rival Roller Derby.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Ranking fifth out of 400 leagues in the world is St. Louis’ own Arch Rival Roller Derby.

Established in 2005 and now reaching numbers near 100, this league has made a name for itself locally, but the skaters are ready to take that to the next level.

“We compete across the state [and country], and now we get an opportunity to compete internationally,” Brooke “Vicious van Gogo” Clark said on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

Wash U’s Adia Harvey Wingfield is the 2018 recipient of the American Sociological Association’s Public Understanding of Sociology Award.
Sean Garcia

Race, gender, work and inequality form the core of sociologist Adia Harvey Wingfield’s research – and her latest study focuses on the intersection of those topics within the medical field.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, in conversation with St. Louis Public Radio contributor John Larson, the Washington University professor of sociology discussed her recent observations of the experiences of black workers in health care.

Michael Kinch is the author of “Between Hope and Fear: A History of Vaccines and Human Immunity.”
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Human immunity – a field of study at the center of Michael Kinch’s career – is a dense subject. But in his new book “Between Hope and Fear: A History of Vaccines and Human Immunity,” Kinch aims to sift through the topic’s complexity and reach lay audiences.

“That was really the goal … there’s a lot of science, a lot of medicine that goes into it, but it’s very approachable,” the author said on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air. “The way we’re trying to do it is to say, ‘How would you talk about this with your grandmother?’”

Jessica Hentoff and Ari Maayan talked about Circus Harmony's trip to Puerto Rico from which they returned earlier this week.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Lions, tigers and … unicyclists, oh my! Circus performers are known for juggling many acts, but the St. Louis Arches can add humanitarian efforts to their repertoire as well.

The City of Clayton has apologized to the 10 black Washington University students involved in the July 7 incident.
File Photo | Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated July 20 at 4:15 p.m. - STLPR journalists Holly Edgell and Chad Davis joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to provide context and analysis about this story.

Original story from 7/19:

Clayton City Manager Craig Owens, Clayton Police Chief Kevin R. Murphy, and other officials met with several black students who were falsely accused of “dining and dashing” at an IHOP in Clayton.

Owens said the meeting was “emotionally powerful.”

“In hindsight, it is clear to us that we mishandled the interaction with these 10 Washington University students and lacked sensitivity about their everyday reality,” he said in a statement.

NPR political commentator Cokie Roberts is in St. Louis for a presentation at the Missouri History Museum.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

For years, radio and television audiences have listened to and watched Cokie Roberts make sense of the news. Currently, as a political commentator for NPR, her analysis is heard on Morning Edition.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Roberts, who will be presenting Thursday night at the Missouri History Museum at an event that’s also presented in collaboration with the Society of the Sacred Heart. The title of the presentation is "Extending America’s Promise: Pioneering Women with Cokie Roberts."

Hosted by St. Louis Public Radio’s Kameel Stanley and Tim Lloyd, the July 10 “I Live Here” event featured five St. Louisans’ stories include one from Chiffontae.
Tim Lloyd | St. Louis Public Radio

In an effort to spur more listener engagement, the “We Live Here” team decided early on to host a community storytelling event. Now in its third year, “I Live Here” features the voices of community members related to a specific topic. Five St. Louisans shared their tales at the latest gathering on July 10.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, “We Live Here” co-host/co-producer Kameel Stanley joined host Don Marsh to talk about the most recent episode of the podcast, which samples a few speakers from the event.

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