St. Louis on the Air | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis on the Air

Noon-1 p.m. and 10-11 p.m. (repeat) Monday-Friday
  • Local Host Don Marsh

St. Louis on the Air creates a unique space where guests and listeners can share ideas and opinions with respect and honesty. Whether exploring issues and challenges confronting our region, discussing the latest innovations in science and technology, taking a closer look at our history or talking with authors, artists and musicians, St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region.

St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh and producers Mary EdwardsAlex Heuer, and Kelly Moffitt give you the information you need to make informed decisions and stay in touch with our diverse and vibrant St. Louis region.

The show is sponsored in part by the Missouri Arts Council, the Regional Arts Commission, and the Arts and Education Council of Greater St. Louis.

Nicole Roach and Lorie Jackson discussed the barriers women of color face in the workplace - and how to overcome them - on Monday's St. Louis on the Air.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Women of color will make up the majority of the female population in the United States by 2050 and yet they often face disproportionate barriers in the workplace, healthcare, educational attainment and other areas of life.

In March 2017, Andres Hernandez, an artist and associate professor of art education, paints the former Bruno David Gallery in Grand Center as part of a visual arts project to demonstrate the changing nature of urban landscapes.
Carolina Hidalgo / St. Louis Public Radio

It may seem counterintuitive for two architects-turned-artists to have crafted an artistic exploration of urban landscape around the idea of tearing down buildings, but that’s exactly what Andres Luis Hernandez and Amanda Williams want you to concentrate on with their recent project in Grand Center.

The two Chicago-based artists want you to think about the process of “unbuilding” as much as you pay attention to the new construction and developments around town when you observe their process deconstructing the former Bruno David Art Gallery on Washington Ave.

Ryan LaPlant, 13, helps pile sandbags near his grandparents’ house in Arnold. May 2017
Carolina Hidalgo / St Louis Public Radio

This week, residents of the St. Louis metropolitan area have been doused with several waves of heavy rainfall, resulting in flooding across the region.

South of St. Louis, Arnold, Fenton, Eureka and Pacific have been particularly hard hit. Similar areas were flooded in December of 2015.

While the Meramec River, which was responsibile for the flooding in that area has crested and is receding, the Missouri River at St. Charles is cresting today and the Mississippi River from Alton down will be cresting from today through tomorrow. 

Alex Donley and Kevin Nashan show off their newly-earned James Beard Foundation Awards.
Catherine Klene | Sauce Magazine

Earlier this week, the St. Louis dining scene was lauded with two more feathers in its cap: the James Beard Foundation awarded Sidney Street Café’s chef/owner Kevin Nashan with the coveted Best Chef: Midwest award and Gioia’s Deli was heralded with an America’s Classic award.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, Nashan and Alex Donley, the co-owner of Gioia’s Deli on the Hill, alongside Sauce Magazine’s Catherine Klene, joined host Don Marsh to discuss the awards, their impact on the St. Louis dining scene and upcoming restaurants to keep an eye out for.

Leanne Magnuson Latuda, Rachel Ebeling and Lydia Ruffin joined St. Louis on the Air contributor Steve Potter to discuss an upcoming performance of the Women's HOPE Chorale.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

“I never thought it would touch my life in the way it did,” said Rachel Ebeling, the co-founder and executive director of the Angel Band Project.

Ebeling is referring to the issue of violence against women. In 2009, Ebeling’s best friend Teresa Butz was killed after she was repeatedly raped by a man who broke into her home in Seattle.

Dr. Richard Eells House in Quincy, Illinois
(Courtesy Arts Quincy)

The Mississippi River town of Quincy, Illinois, was a major stop on the Underground Railroad as slaves attempted to make their way from Missouri to a free state.

Quincy’s role in the Underground Railroad – a network of often secretive locations used to help enslaved people escape to free states and Canada – is highlighted in the events that took place at the home of Dr. Richard Eells and his wife, Jane, during the mid-19th century.

On June 14, 1897, Lt. James Moss, U.S. Army, led his bicycle corps of the 25th Infantry, from Fort Missoula, Montana, up a wagon trail and Indian path, to St. Louis, arriving  on July 16, 1897.
Public Domain | Wikimedia Commons

More than a century ago, in 1897, U.S. Army soldiers road bicycles 1,900 miles, from Fort Missoula, Montana to St. Louis.

The 20 soldiers who made the trip were part of the 25th Infantry, a racially-segregated group known as Buffalo Soldiers. The term refers to black soldiers who served west of the Mississippi River in regiments initially formed in 1866, after the end of the Civil War.

“It was a very exciting event,” Angela da Silva, a historian and adjunct professor at Lindenwood University, told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh.

Beth Huebner, a professor of criminology and criminal justice at UMSL, joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss recent research about fines, court fees and surcharges at play in the criminal justice system.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed research about the role fines, court fees, surcharges and more play in the criminal justice system. The issue gained prominence in the St. Louis area after Michael Brown’s shooting death in 2014.

Carrie Houk and Richard Corley discussed the second annual Tennessee Williams Festival in St. Louis on St. Louis on the Air.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

It is well documented that playwright Tennessee Williams did not look kindly on his childhood spent in St. Louis, Missouri. Born in Mississippi into a “bucolic atmosphere” near his grandparents, the author of “The Glass Menagerie” and “A Streetcar Named Desire” was uprooted at age eight when his alcoholic father was transferred to International Shoe Company in St. Louis.

Dan Lauer, Allison Bischoff and Brian Dixon joined St. Louis on the Air to talk about entrepreneurship in St. Louis.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

A new business accelerator program seeks to put entrepreneurs on a fast track to advancing innovative energy solutions.

The application deadline to the competitive Ameren Accelerator program is May 12th.

Each year for the next three years, five to seven recipients will receive office space in the Cortex Innovation Community and $100,000 in exchange for 8 percent equity in the company – all told, about $1 million in perks and benefits that are part of the highly structured 12-week program.

Une Conversation (A Conversation), 1892-99, plaster, Museo Medardo Rosso
Pulitzer Arts Foundation

Turn-of-the-century artist Medardo Rosso defies categorization as much as his body of work, now on display at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, was ahead of its time. He was born in Italy but spent many decades of his working years in Paris primarily as a sculptor, although he also produced photographs and drawings.

Mary Miller, Anne Barton-Veenkant and Chloe Jackson joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss this weekend's People's Climate March.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

This weekend, St. Louis will play host to a local People’s Climate March. The event is spearheaded by a new local grassroots group called 350 STL, which is part of an international organizing collective called 350.org.

St. Louis Public Radio's Science and Environment Reporter Eli Chen is part of the organizing effort to bring The Story Collider to St. Louis next week.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Next Tuesday, St. Louis will play host to Story Collider, a traveling storytelling show that records stories about science.  The event’s theme is “Eclipse” and will feature five storytellers from the St. Louis region, in partnership with the 38th annual St. Louis Storytelling Festival, which takes places May 3-6.

File Photo | Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s “Behind the Headlines” with St. Louis on the Air, we took an in-depth look at some of the top news stories of the week.

Joining us on this week’s edition was St. Louis Public Radio Political Reporter Jason Rosenbaum.

Alan Mallach, Henry Webber and Reginald Scott discussed the concept of "middle neighborhoods" on St. Louis on the Air on April 27.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

There are neighborhoods in St. Louis that are thriving and those that are very much struggling, but what about neighborhoods that fall somewhere in the middle? On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, we discussed the idea of "middle neighborhoods," which comes from a recent research study called "On the Edge: America's Middle Neighborhoods," published by American Assembly.

Michael Middleton
Courtesy University of Missouri Columbia

This weekend will be the last for a performance of “My Country: A Devised Work,” a play presented by the UMSL's Theatre and Cinema Arts department, which was inspired by Sam Beadle’s poem “My Country.”

Bill Freivogel, Jared Boyd and Mark Smith shared their perspectives on the month's legal news on St. Louis on the Air.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday, St. Louis on the Air’s monthly legal roundtable returned to address pressing issues of the law with a panel of local legal experts.

On Tuesday's St. Louis on the Air, we discussed the experiences of Chinese immigrants and Chinese Americans in St. Louis with Lucy Burns, Min Liu and Caroline Fan joined the program to discuss
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

U.S.-China political and economic relations may make headlines frequently today, but the connection between the two countries is hundreds of years old in terms of immigration, business and culture.

Mike Mullins, director of Tionól, and Eimear Arkins, an Irish singer and fiddle player, joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss upcoming concerts and workshops.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Irish singer and fiddle player Eimear Arkins first came to the United States to Missouri for university. After completing her degree, she headed home to Ireland for a while, returning to St. Louis in 2014 to stay. With her, Arkins brought her fiddle and a singing voice steeped in Irish folk singing tradition from County Clare.

St. Louis Blues President and CEO Chris Zimmerman, photographed at St. Louis Public Radio's studios on April 24, 2017.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Saturday, the St. Louis Blues defeated the Minnesota Wild, moving on to the next level of the Stanley Cup playoffs. Next, they’ll take on the Nashville Predators.

“The Minnesota Wild are a really strong team with a lot of weapons,” said Blues President and CEO Chris Zimmerman. “It took great goaltending and our guys stepping up to get by them. For many people that was a surprise to see us winning in five games. Nashville is playing really well. You don’t sweep the Chicago Blackhawks without being an outstanding team.”

Anne Allred, a KSDK anchor, recently underwent kidney transplant surgery. She spoke with St. Louis on the Air's Don Marsh on April 24, 2017.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Last April, KSDK Anchor Anne Allred hadn’t given a thought to organ donation. She was preparing to have a baby in August and balancing life as an evening anchor of KSDK news.

A year later, everything is different for Allred as she marks this year’s National Donate Life Month. In the past year, she faced the premature birth of her daughter, Nora, and her extended stay in the NICU, severe renal failure due to a rare kidney disorder, dialysis and an eventual kidney transplant.

Companion Kombucha is a brand of fermented tea that is manufactered in St. Louis.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

At first, it might be hard to understand the appeal of kombucha, a food trend that has made its way from the coasts to St. Louis. A fermented tea drink that’s made using a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast sitting atop brewed tea that often tastes like vinegar? Sounds iffy.

Nicole Hudson has recently accepted a position as senior policy advisor to Lyda Krewson, directing racial equity and priority initiatives.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s “Behind the Headlines” with St. Louis on the Air, we took an in-depth look at some of the top news stories of the week.

This week, for the first time in 16 years, St. Louis saw the inauguration of a new mayor: Lyda Krewson. She also happens to be the city’s first female mayor ever.

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Moyan Brenn | Flickr

The concept of a library is over 5,000 years old, but that doesn’t mean these community institutions are stuck in the Stone Age. On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, we heard from librarians from two different communities in the region, in Ferguson, Mo., and Fairmont City, Ill., and how they are innovating exactly what the concept of a library is.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

If you’ve watched Cardinals baseball in the past 20 years, you know the story of Rick Ankiel, a former pitcher-turned-outfielder who joined the Cardinals organization in the late ‘90s as a pitcher expected to become the next Bob Gibson. He was doing well until 2001, when his pitching became suddenly and conspicuously erratic. No one, not even Ankiel, could identify the reason why.

Antiobitic resistance is a big concern in the medical community these days. On Wednesday's St. Louis on the Air, we turn our attention to the issue.
Nathan Reading | Flickr

When Meredith Littlejohn died, her parents Steve Littlejohn and Stefanie London had spent over a year in and out of the hospital with her for treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia. It wasn’t AML that killed Meredith, but rather an antibiotic-resistant infection she developed in the hospital while her immune system was compromised.

Antibiotic-resistant infection is a rising issue in American society and thousands of people die each year when they develop infections that no antibiotic can control.

Jon Else, filmmaker and author of "True South," discussed the legacy of St. Louis filmmaker Henry Hampton with St. Louis on the Air on Wednesday.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Filmmaker Henry Hampton grew up in segregated St. Louis, Richmond Heights to be specific, during the 1940s. He would go on to found a film production company called Blackside, Inc. in Boston. His company produced over 80 documentaries and other productions and most notably created “Eyes on the Prize.”

The 14-part documentary is considered one of the most influential and definitive documentaries about the 30 years encompassing what Americans call the civil rights movement era, from Emmett Till to the Black Panthers.

This week marks National Healtcare Decisions week. On Tuesday, Virginia Rice and Brian Carpented joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss how to make end-of-life decisions easier.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

This week, health-care professionals and families are making a point to talk about a subject that can be very difficult for some: end-of-life decisions. This week marks National Healthcare Decisions week.

Keisha Mabry, the Director of Innovation at College Bound, recently wrote a book about connecting with other people called "Hey Friend: 100 Ways to Connect with 100 People in 100 Days."
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

In her daily work at College Bound, Keisha Mabry, the organization’s director of innovation, administers a text messaging app for students called Bridgit 2 College, which connects high school graduates who’ve been accepted to colleges with people to send them reminders about deadlines to meet and experiences to prepare for when they go to college.

Jim Craig, James Petersen, Heath McClung, and Jonathan Hurly, all veterans, joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss what it is like to be a student veteran.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

When people think of the issues faced by veterans in their return to civilian life, the mind often goes to stereotypes: trauma, PTSD, disability. That’s not the only story to tell, said Jonathan Hurly, president of the Saint Louis University Veterans Association.

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