St. Louis on the Air

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1 p.m. and 10 p.m. - 11 p.m. (repeat)

St. Louis on the Air provides discussion about issues and concerns facing the St. Louis area. The show is produced by Mary Edwards and Alex Heuer and hosted by veteran journalist Don Marsh.

To call in during the noon broadcast call (314) 382-TALK (8255) or email talk@stlpublicradio.org.

Follow the show on Twitter @STLonAir

Subscribe to our e-newsletter, The Talk Studio, to receive previews of upcoming guests, highlights from the most-talked about shows, and questions from our producers.

Coming up this week:

Monday: A discussion about building a sense of community within neighborhoods. What works? What doesn't?

Tuesday: A discussion about climate change just after a UN panel released a new report saying major action is needed to curb greenhouse gas emissions. We’ll also hear the personal stories of some St. Louis residents and their interaction with climate change, including that of a local seasonal park ranger at Crater Lake National Park in Oregon.

Wednesday: A discussion about the ongoing volatile situation in Ukraine.

Thursday: A conversation with Missouri native, actor and activist Ed Asner, who will be in St. Louis later this month. Among other things, he’ll be performing his one-man show, a tribute to FDR, presented by New Jewish Theatre.

And a discussion with Mayor Francis Slay and local architect Dan Jay about a ‘thought experiment’ of what it would take to raise St. Louis’ population to 500,000.

Local Host(s): 
Don Marsh
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a94ee1c876c646471715|5182a93be1c876c6464716bd

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St. Louis on the Air
4:32 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Author Discusses Shortcomings Of Social Science Program Introduced During The War In Afghanistan

Vanessa Gezari
Deborah Copaken Kogan / Courtesy Simon & Schuster

American involvement in the war in Afghanistan is winding down with no real victory in sight. In the midst of the war a new program called the Human Terrain System was introduced, intended to aid soldiers on the ground by helping them understand the cultural nuances of the Afghan and Iraqi people. The program  had good intentions but fatal flaws, said journalist and author Vanessa Gezari.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:39 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

New CEO Discusses What's Next For The Urban League

Michael McMillan became the CEO of The Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis on August 5, 2013.
(Courtesy Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis)

The Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis has a rich history in the region, with roots that stretch back 95 years. For the past 28 years, the organization has been led by James Buford, who retired as CEO at the end of May.

Former alderman and City License Collector Michael McMillan became the new CEO of the Urban League  last week. St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh sat down with McMillan to discuss what's next for the organization.

Although McMillan is new to the role of CEO, he is not new to the Urban League. He has been a member since he was sixteen.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:18 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

The Battle Between Your Body Clock And The Mechanical Clock

Our internal clock is in tune with the cycle of night and day.
(via Flikr/Stephen Bowler)

It's not easy to adjust to a new time zone or work schedule. Our body has a natural sleep/wake cycle and disruptions to it can lead to more than just feeling tired or exhausted.

Washington University professors Paul Gray and Erik Herzog are studying the biology behind our daily internal clock, or circadian rhythm. Sometimes referred to as the body or biological clock, Herzog defined it as "the entity within the body that synchronizes with an environmental cycle." This is not to be confused with the biological clock some refer to when thinking of a woman's desire to conceive. 

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St. Louis on the Air
10:42 am
Thu August 8, 2013

Is Living In Downtown St. Louis Living Up To Expectations?

Downtown St. Louis
(Flickr Creative Commons User Daniel Leininger)

Updated following the show.

St. Louis City leaders are counting on attracting new residents Downtown as part of an urban renaissance.  The area has seen recent population growth, but questions remain about the future of the area. Host Don Marsh posed those questions to our guests, including:

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St. Louis on the Air
4:51 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Is The U.S. Poised For Its First Female President? Author Discusses Women In Politics

Democrat Claire McCaskill waves to a room full of supporters as she claims victory after defeating incumbent Senator Jim Talent in the U.S. Senate race. (UPI Photo/Bill Greenblatt)

The United States Senate has 20 women in office, a mark never before reached prior to the last election. The top political seats in New Hampshire are all held by women: a female governor, two women in the U.S. Senate and women in both of the state's U.S. House seats.

Former Secretary of State and First Lady Hillary Clinton ran for president in 2008 and there is talk of her running again in 2016. Are these signs that America could soon have a woman break the last glass ceiling to executive power or are there still obstacles in the way?

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St. Louis on the Air
4:40 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Payday Loan Industry Under Scrutiny, Mo. Opponents Renew Effort To Cap Interest Rates

A group of community and religious leaders is proposing a Missouri ballot measure that would effectively limit the cost of payday loans.
flickr/taberandrew

Opponents of payday loans say extremely high interest rates and quick turn-around sink people into a never-ending cycle of debt. Those in favor of the loans say they are providing a necessary service by offering loans to people who otherwise would not have access to them.

An investigative series by reporter Paul Kiel of ProPublica is shedding light on the issue.

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St. Louis on the Air
3:31 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

SLU Cardiologist, Nutritionist Weigh In On The AMA's Classification Of Obesity As A Disease

(via Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Earlier this year, the American Medical Association voted to re-classify obesity as a disease rather than a condition. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one-third of adults in the United States are obese. Combine those two facts, and it can now be said that one in three Americans are ill, all with the same disease.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:22 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Does St. Louis City Deserve Ranking Of Fourth Most Dangerous? Police Chief, Consultant Weigh In

St. Louis Metropolitan Police Chief Sam Dotson.
(St. Louis Metropolitan Police Dept.)

St. Louis City is currently ranked as the fourth most dangerous city in the nation by CQ Press, based on FBI reports of the number of crimes committed in 2011. But according to St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department Chief Sam Dotson and University of Missouri-St. Louis criminology professor Richard Rosenfeld, those numbers fail to tell the whole story.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:51 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

On 20th Anniversary, MetroLink Leaders Discuss Development And Vision Of Transit System

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Twenty years ago today, Metro St. Louis slid open the doors for the first ride on its new light rail system. Although the system was built on an existing freight line, the path to its existence was not clear or easy.

"Until the very day that it opened, people did not believe this system was going to exist," said Les Sterman, supervisor of the Southern Illinois Flood Prevention District and former executive director of the East-West Gateway Council of Governments. He worked for years to make the MetroLink a reality.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:46 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

New Book Profiles The History And Revitalization Of Delmar Loop

Overview of the Delmar Loop, circa 1931.
(Courtesy University City Public Library Archives)

When Edward Gardner Lewis purchased the land that would become University City at the turn of the twentieth century, there wasn't much in the area beyond an amusement park, a race track and the loop of the trolley from which Delmar Loop gets its name. But he had a vision for a magazine empire and needed space to expand his printing presses. He built an iconic octagonal building for his headquarters overlooking the street car line and in view of the site of the upcoming 1904 World's Fair. From there, a bustling street of businesses grew, full of places to eat, shop and have a good time.

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