St. Louis on the Air

Monday - Thursday, noon - 1 p.m. and 10 p.m. - 11 p.m. (repeat)

St. Louis on the Air provides discussion about issues and concerns facing the St. Louis area. The show is produced by Mary Edwards and Alex Heuer and hosted by veteran journalist Don Marsh.

To call in during the noon broadcast call (314) 382-TALK (8255) or email talk@stlpublicradio.org.

Follow the show on Twitter @STLonAir

Subscribe to our e-newsletter, The Talk Studio, to receive previews of upcoming guests, highlights from the most-talked about shows, and questions from our producers.

Local Host(s): 
Don Marsh
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a94ee1c876c646471715|5182a93be1c876c6464716bd

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St. Louis on the Air
5:05 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

St. Louis Public Radio Launches 'Lobbying Missouri' To Follow The Money

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Companies and other organizations with an interest in Missouri state government hire lobbyists to influence policy in Jefferson City. State law requires lobbyists to disclose how much they spend in the process, listing which officials received benefits, such as free meals, professional sports tickets, trips and other gifts.

Lobbying Missouri, a new reporting partnership of St. Louis Public Radio and NPR, provides an interactive way to follow the money.

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St. Louis on the Air
6:53 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Are Fathers' Rights Fair And Equitable In Missouri?

Painting 231 titled "The Good Part" in Cbabi Bayoc's series "365 Days With Dad"
Cbabi Bayoc

When it comes to determining child custody, some say the courts favor the mother. Do they? Should they?

According to Halbert Sullivan and Lisl King Williams, Missouri courts more often give custody to mothers than to fathers, and make it especially difficult for a low income father that was never married to the mother of his child. Sullivan is the founder and CEO of the Fathers' Support Center, located in North St. Louis. Williams is the director of  legal services there.

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St. Louis on the Air
6:39 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Report: Poor Mental Health Among African Americans In St. Louis Decreases Opportunities For Success

Jason Purnell
Credit Washington University

Third Brief: For the Sake of All

The third brief of a groundbreaking and interdisciplinary study on African American health in St. Louis examines how mental health affects social and economic opportunities.

The latest brief in the “For the Sake of All” study asks how we can improve mental health in St. Louis. 

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St. Louis on the Air
4:33 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Why Are More Entrepreneurs Calling St. Louis Home?

Haley O'Brien at the Magic Chef complex on The Hill, where she hopes to create a hydroponic farm.
(Courtesy Washington University in St. Louis)

St. Louis is beginning to build a name for itself as a center for entrepreneurship. Last year, funding for tech startups in the region almost doubled, bringing in nearly $30 million in investments. The T-Rex campus downtown - founded two years ago explicitly to foster entrepreneurship in St. Louis - is currently home to more than 70 startups.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:44 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Bust Of British Leader With Mo. Ties Dedicated At U.S. Capitol

Bust of Winston Churchill dedicated October, 30, 2013 in Washington, D.C.
Brian Naylor / NPR

British leader Sir Winston Churchill gets his share of attention in Missouri. The national museum dedicated to the prime minister who led Great Britain through World War II is located in Fulton. But this week, Churchill was the focus of bipartisan national and international attention, as Congress dedicated a bust of the leader during a ceremony in Statuary Hall.

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St. Louis on the Air
3:58 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Barnes-Jewish Hospital Combats Compassion Fatigue With Training Program

(Courtesy Barnes-Jewish Hospital)

Caring for people experiencing pain and suffering day in and day out can be trying for nurses and other healthcare professionals. Especially when they feel like the work is never done. That feeling is called compassion fatigue and at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, they've developed a program to help.

Some might equate compassion fatigue with burnout, but it is more complex than that, said Pat Potter, director of research and compassion fatigue program developer at Barnes-Jewish.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:56 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Heard Of 'The Exorcist?' This St. Louis Event Inspired It

The exorcism ended at the Alexian Brothers Hospital in South St. Louis. The room where it took place was sealed-off for years and that wing of the hospital was demolished in 1978.
(Courtesy: John Waide, University Archivist, Saint Louis University)

The mattress began to shake.  Arms and legs flailing.  For hours he fluctuated between frenzy and calm.

The following phrases describe an exorcism that took place in March and April of 1949.  A cadre of Jesuit priests affiliated with Saint Louis University, led by Father William S. Bowdern, the pastor of St. Francis Xavier Church, undertook the exorcism of a 14-year-old boy. They took turns praying over the boy, working to cast out the demon believed to have possessed him.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:40 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

Update: Next Steps For Arch Grounds Redevelopment

(Courtesy CityArchRiver)

Construction of the Central River Project along the Gateway Arch begins November 14. It is a key component of the CityArchRiver 2015 redevelopment plans. Great Rivers Greenway is taking the lead on the project.

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St. Louis on the Air
3:56 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

NPR's David Greene Returns To St. Louis, Where He Got His Journalistic Jumpstart

David Greene, NPR's Morning Programming Host/Correspondent.
NPR

St. Louis Public Radio listeners know David Greene for his work with NPR's Morning Edition, and his years covering Russia and the White House. But before he joined NPR in 2005, Greene was a newspaper man. He credits an internship with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch for jump-starting his career.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:16 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

How America's 'Old Man River' Shaped History

A screenshot of the Mississippi River watershed from the stream mapping tool created by the Department of the Interior.
www.nationalatlas.gov/streamer

From transporting Native Americans to the founding of the United States and beyond, the Mississippi River is an integral part of American history.

In his new book, Old Man River: The Mississippi River in North American History, author Paul Schneider weaves together all of these stories and more to tell the greater story of a continent formed and transformed by a river which both divides and unites.

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