St. Louis on the Air

Noon-1 p.m. and 10-11 p.m. (repeat) Monday-Friday
  • Local Host Don Marsh

St. Louis on the Air creates a unique space where guests and listeners can share ideas and opinions with respect and honesty. Whether exploring issues and challenges confronting our region, discussing the latest innovations in science and technology, taking a closer look at our history or talking with authors, artists and musicians, St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region.

St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh and producers Mary EdwardsAlex Heuer, and Kelly Moffitt give you the information you need to make informed decisions and stay in touch with our diverse and vibrant St. Louis region.

Subscribe to our e-newsletterThe Talk Studio, to receive previews of upcoming guests, highlights from the most-talked about shows, and questions from our producers.

The show is sponsored in part by the Missouri Arts Council, the Regional Arts Commission, and the Arts and Education Council of Greater St. Louis.

J. Henry Fair

Sharon Isbin, a renowned classical guitarist, will come to St. Louis next week. Isbin has performed with over 170 orchestras around the world, often joins Garrison Keillor’s “A Prairie Home Companion,” and has received multiple Grammy Awards.  

Although she started playing guitar when she was only nine years old in Italy and primarily grew up in Minneapolis, her return to St. Louis will be a bit of a homecoming.

Conrad Anker Credit Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

American mountaineer Conrad Anker is a surprisingly laid-back guy for someone who led the three-person team to the first-ever summit of the formidable Shark's Fin of Meru Peak (also starring in the doc that won a prestigious Audience Award at Sundance last year). He was also the man who found the body of climber George Mallory on his first summit of Mt. Everest.

Before it was banned in 1978, lead paint was commonly used in homes. In St. Louis City, which is dominated by older housing stock, lead contamination is still prevalent.
Abby Lanes | Flickr

The lead contamination water crisis in Flint, which has captivated American attention since early this year, has a lot of people asking: Could this happen where I live? On Wednesday’s “St. Louis on the Air,” several guests joined host Don Marsh to discuss the state of lead remediation in St. Louis and if a water crisis of such a magnitude could occur here.

GotCredit | Flickr | http://bit.ly/1TPsTLr

The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis just released a report about various kinds of debt and how it is impacting different populations in St. Louis, Memphis, Little Rock and Louisville. Spoiler alert: yes, student loan debt is still crippling the younger generation…as are car loans.

As the report points out, the delinquency rate for young borrowers has increased since before the recession. Such delinquency rates can mean a host of problems in accessing credit and the ability to save as young Americans start their adult lives.

Steven S. | Flickr | http://bit.ly/1Qo19ck

Earlier this year, the work of Dr. Stuart Slavin, a pediatrician and associate dean for curriculum at Saint Louis University School of Medicine, was featured in a New York Times opinion piece on the stress of students today. Slavin found through an anonymous study at a high school in California that 54 percent of students showed moderate to severe symptoms of depression.

Multicolored peppers
mgstanton | Flickr | http://bit.ly/1QRJCip

The Sound Bites team at Sauce Magazine is back and ready to help you plan your nights out at St. Louis restaurants during the month of March.

Meera Nagarajan and Heather Hughes, the magazine’s art director and managing editor, respectively, joined “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh to discuss the openings and closings of restaurants you should know.

On their list? Olive & Oak, Boundary, The Muddled Pig Gastropub, and more.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

A native of St. Louis, Leon Burke III began music studies at age 12. By age 16 he was already conducting. Although he was also interested in science and math, he chose music as his field of study in college, earning a bachelor’s degree from the Oberlin Conservatory and masters and doctorate degrees from the University of Kansas. He also studied as a Fulbright Fellow in Paraguay.

Scott Schliebe | Wikimedia Commons

Climate change is causing the Earth to change in drastic ways. Global temperatures are rising, oceans are warming, ice sheets are shrinking and the implications are vast for flora and fauna.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says “scientific evidence for warming of the climate system is unequivocal.”

The Peace Train

This summer, a nationwide movement known as “The Peace Train,” will start its tour across the country in Ferguson. The program’s mission? Bringing together people from all backgrounds to sing about shared values and hopes for a better future.

The Peace Train 2016 Tour Across America is modeled off of a similar project in South Africa from 1993 that was documented in the film “When Voices Meet.”

(Mark Kitaoka, Courtesy: Opera Theatre of St. Louis)

Famed writer Salman Rushdie was born in 1947 in India. In 2005, he published a sweeping work about the beleaguered but beautiful territory of Kashmir, a place with ancestral ties. As of 2016, that novel is becoming an opera of the same name—to be premiered by Opera Theatre of Saint Louis in June.  

The opera’s composer, Jack Perla, and librettist, Rajiv Joseph, joined “St. Louis on the Air” contributor Steve Potter to discuss the opera and how it came to be.

Protesters carrying a banner that reads demand constitutional policing work to interrupt a meeting of the Ferguson City Council on February 23, 2016.
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

In our weekly "Behind the Headlines" segment, “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh discussed the top news stories that caught St. Louisans’ attention this week, with the people that produced them and influenced them.

Joining the show:

  • Jo Mannies, St. Louis Public Radio reporter
  • Rachel Lippman, St. Louis Public Radio reporter

What we talked about:

Famed choreographers Dianne McIntyre and Bebe Miller discussed their parts in Dance St. Louis' production of New Dance Horizons IV.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Dance St. Louis’ fourth installment of “New Dance Horizons” celebrates Black History Month. It will highlight the works of three nationally-renowned African-American choreographers inspired by those who came before them.

Miles Davis and Maya Angelou were two such artists with St. Louis ties that inspired choreographers Bebe Miller and Dianne McIntyre, respectively, as they created pieces that will be performed by St. Louis dancers this weekend.

OakleyOriginals | Flickr | http://bit.ly/1Qd8rzx

Prolific writer Howard Megdal, whose work has appeared in Sports Illustrated, The New York Times, USA Today, among others, just released his fourth book “The Cardinals Way: How One Team Embraced Tradition and Moneyball at the Same Time.” In it, he details how the Cardinals franchise has been able to embrace both “moneyball” and tradition to become one of the most beloved and successful teams in the sport.

St. Louis has an active Polish community. On Wednesday's "St. Louis on the Air," we'll be talking about it.
Dan Markye | Flickr | http://bit.ly/1VCzpEo

You may have heard the oft-repeated statistic that “Chicago has the largest population of Polish people outside of Warsaw.” As WBEZ pointed out last year, that may not be entirely true. While St. Louis certainly does not have the same number of Poles as Chicago or New York, we do have an active Polish community.

A billboard depicting a common myth about eating disorders.
Missouri Eating Disorder Association

Eating disorders aren’t a “real” problem. Eating disorders are a “cry for attention.” Parents are to blame for eating disorders. Eating disorders only happen to white, middle class women. These are all common myths about eating disorders that guests on Wednesday’s “St. Louis on the Air” sought to address.

On Tuesday's 'St. Louis on the Air,' clinical psychologist Suma Chand will discuss overcoming fears and phobias, such as spiders.
Jake Vince | Flickr | http://bit.ly/1oDwd14

Airplanes. Insects. Rabid bears. Needles. There are millions of things to be scared of in everyday life but, for some, fears and phobias dominate the mind. Suma Chand, a clinical psychologist and associate professor in psychiatry with Saint Louis University, helps patients with phobias and fears overcome them.

St. Louis is host to over 40 comic creators. We talked to two of them in-studio and more online today.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Comics are no longer solely relegated to syndicated placement in newspapers or in comic books—the increasing popularity of the World Wide Web changed that. Today, you’re just as likely to find a comic you love on a Tumblr, Facebook page, or webpage than in a comic book shop. These web comics (that come in strips, series, and serials) are often an entry for women and people of color into the world of comics and comic book publishing — a field typically dominated by white men.

Steven Louis Brawley and Nancy Fowler.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Author Steven Louis Brawley said that at the first Pride parade held in St. Louis, in 1980, many participants had to disguise themselves with painted faces and masks as they were worried about what repercussions revealing their sexual orientation would have.

Times have changed. On June 25, 2014 four same-sex couples married in St. Louis City Hall despite Missouri’s constitutional ban on gay marriage. A little over a year later, on July 26, 2015, the Supreme Court struck down state bans on same-sex marriage, ensuring same-sex couples could marry the country over. 

Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Today, St. Louis Public Radio released its series on homicide in the city of St. Louis after months of preparation. The series takes a look at homicide from the point-of-view of a victim’s family and friends, investigators, first responders and the residents of a neighborhood. While many media portrayals of St. Louis’ homicide rate come as statistics, with little more than a blurb or sound bite attached to them, reporters Durrie Bouscaren and Rachel Lippmann looked at the issue more deeply.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

In our weekly "Behind the Headlines" segment, “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh discussed the top news stories that caught St. Louisans’ attention this week, with the people that produced them and influenced them.

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