St. Louis on the Air

Noon-1 p.m. and 10-11 p.m. (repeat) Monday-Thursday
  • Local Host Don Marsh

St. Louis on the Air provides discussion about issues and concerns facing the St. Louis area. The show is produced by Mary Edwards and Alex Heuer and hosted by veteran journalist Don Marsh. Our online producer is Erica Smith.

Subscribe to our e-newsletter, The Talk Studio, to receive previews of upcoming guests, highlights from the most-talked about shows, and questions from our producers.

(via NPR)

NPR's senior social media strategist Andy Carvin was our sole guest today on "St. Louis on the Air." 

Carvin touched on his beginnings, his role as a "information DJ" and how he pieces together truth in real time.

How does he describe his job?

Carvin said one of the best ways he can think of to describe what he does is a "journalistic test pilot."

"I use the word storytelling because...not everything I do could be considered journalism."

"Someone once referred to what I do as 'information DJ-ing.'"

Last summer’s drought in the United States, and particularly here in the Midwest, would lead one to ask if there is enough water to meet the world’s needs.  According to Dr. Roberto Lenton, Professor of Biological Systems Engineering and Executive Director of the Robert B. Daugherty Water for Food Institute at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln, the answer is “yes.”

Lance Tilford Photography

Life coach Jill Farmer quit her career as a television consumer reporter and discovered that although she no longer had a fulltime job, she was still busy with little productivity to show for it.  She found herself swinging from the “hamster wheel” mode of moving for the sake of moving but not seeming to get anything done, to the overwhelming state of paralysis where she wasn’t sure where to start.

Evan C. Parker / Via Flickr

The St. Louis Beacon’s Washington Correspondent Rob Koenig was Don Marsh’s guest on “St.

Anna Saphphire via Flickr

The Violence Against Women Act was originally passed by Congress in 1994, spearheaded by then Senator Joe Biden.  But when the act expired in 2011, it took more than a year of wrangling before Congress could come to terms on its reauthorization.  When President Obama signed the reauthorization of the act on March 7, several additional groups of women were covered.  Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered persons, Native American women on tribal land and immigrants are now protected.

U.S. VETS

Making the transition from the military to civilian life can be difficult. 

Many veterans come out of the military with combat trauma, a condition which must be dealt with before they can move on.  And many don’t admit their condition for fear their discharge will be delayed or they won’t be able to get jobs needing a security clearance or jobs in law enforcement. 

Only a fraction of those with combat trauma register with a VA hospital.

(Courtesy: Saint Louis Urban Debate League)

Debate is an activity in which thousands of high school and college students participate throughout the country.

The academic activity takes many forms and styles though ‘policy debate’ is one of the most common.

Wikipedia

When Mary Beth Tinker was a middle school student in Iowa, she never dreamed that she would one day see her name attached to a Supreme Court decision in her college text book.  But that’s exactly what happened.

Stephen Voss for NPR

Ari Shapiro is a White House correspondent for NPR.

His stories about ongoing political negotiations in Washington, D.C. are familiar to public radio listeners as is his recent guest hosting of Talk of the Nation.

Shapiro, a graduate of Yale University, began his journalism career in 2001 in the office of NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg.  He would go on to cover the Justice Department and serve reporting stints in Atlanta, Miami and Boston.  The award-winning journalist was the first NPR reporter to be promoted to correspondent before age thirty.

(via Flickr/marcn)

Earlier this year, the 113th Congress was sworn in and as part of that, there are now a record-breaking 20 female senators.

U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer of California told ABC “World News” anchor Diane Sawyer, "I think that until we get to 50, we still have to fight because it's still a problem.”

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