2014 Legislative Session | St. Louis Public Radio

2014 Legislative Session

/Via Flickr/ KOMU news, Manu Bhandari

The city of St. Louis and St. Louis County have plans for nearly $1.1 billion worth of transportation projects if a statewide sales tax increase passes this August. 

St. Louis and St. Louis County officials revealed their wish list of projects that would be funded with the .75 percent sales tax increase.  If the transportation tax passes in August, St. Louis, St. Charles, Jefferson and Franklin counties and  the city of St. Louis, are expected receive about $1.49 billion over a 10-year period from the state’s transportation commission.

Jo Mannies/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House and Senate each spent the waning minutes of the legislative session embroiled in debate over a bill to nullify most federal gun laws.

But afterward, it was Gov. Jay Nixon who fired off the first post-session shots. His target was the General Assembly’s final-day spending spree.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The second half of Missouri's 2014 regular session is underway. Leaders in both chambers and from both parties remain focused on crafting a state budget and on easing the burden of the state's student transfer law — but they remain divided on expanding Medicaid.

Medicaid expansion a 'nonstarter'

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The first half of Missouri's 2014 legislative session is over, and lawmakers have left Jefferson City for their annual spring break.

House Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka, touted the passage of several of his priorities, including photo voter ID legislation, conscientious objections to certain medical procedures, and ending the economic border war between Missouri and Kansas.  Jones told reporters Thursday he wants to push several issues when they return in a week and a half, including right-to-work legislation.

Status Update: 2014 Missouri Legislative Session

Mar 4, 2014
The Missouri Capitol building.
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

With the 2014 Missouri legislative session nearing the halfway point, St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh spoke with St. Louis Public Radio reporters Jo Mannies and Marshall Griffin to get the latest on the issues and bills being debated by state lawmakers.

Among the topics discussed were the state budget, the student transfer bill, the photo voter ID bills, and the impact of who is and who is not running for re-election.

Editor's Weekly: How Missouri's Legislature Is Like A Snowstorm

Jan 9, 2014
Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

Two topics dominated St. Louisans' news this week -- unusual cold and snow returned to our region and Missouri legislators returned to Jefferson City.

It would be snarky to ask which poses the greater threat to public welfare. Yet as the bad weather rolled out and the legislators rolled in, I couldn't help but notice certain parallels in the way we think about these natural and political phenomena.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri General Assembly's 2014 session is underway, and the first day sounded a lot like last year's session.

In his opening remarks, House Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka, laid out his agenda for this year's regular session: medical malpractice reform, making Missouri a right-to-work state, and cutting taxes.

"Missourians need and want lower taxes," Jones said.  "Missourians also want us to engage in significant reforms of our tax credit system, (and) end our governor's practice of picking winners and losers via a centralized planning authority."

Tim Bommel, Mo. House Communications

Despite the bad weather,  Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones hit the road early Thursday to begin his three-day tour through southern Missouri to highlight his “4G Agenda” for the new legislative session, which begins next week.

Jones’ planned focus includes revisiting the tax cuts that dominated much of the 2013 session as well as his push to revamp public education, promote energy production and examine such issues as “right to work,’’ which bars unions and employers from requiring all workers to become members when a majority votes for union representation.