2018 Missouri General Assembly | St. Louis Public Radio

2018 Missouri General Assembly

State Rep. Bob Burns' legislation would make it easier to hold disincorporation elections in St. Louis County.
File photo I Tim Bommel I House Communications

Updated at 10 p.m. April 23 with Burns saying he won't resign—The top leaders of the Missouri Democratic Party are calling for a south St. Louis County lawmaker to resign after he praised a radio host who commonly makes racist and misogynist remarks.

At issue are state Rep. Bob Burns’ calls into a radio show hosted by Bob Romanik, a Metro East political figure. He’s often said things on his show that are derogatory to African-Americans and women.

Attorney Ed Dowd walks out of a St. Louis courthouse on Thursday, April 19, 2018. A judge ruled that Greitens' felony invasion of privacy trial would continue.
Carolina Hidalgo I St. Louis Public Radio

Updated on April 20 at 7:30 p.m. after St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner charged Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens with a felony  On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Jo Mannies and Rachel Lippmann break down all the developments in the ongoing saga around Gov. Eric Greitens.

This week was particularly newsworthy. After last week’s release of an explosive House report that led to widespread calls for Greitens to resign, at least four events ended up placing Greitens’ political career on virtual life support. (We uploaded a new version of the show after Greitens was indicted last Friday for felony computer data tampering.)

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley is the best-known Republican candidate to take on McCaskill.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated April 18 at 5:38 p.m. with governor's effort to block Hawley from further investigation — Attorney General Josh Hawley is asking the St. Louis circuit attorney to file criminal charges against Gov. Eric Greitens for allegedly illegally obtaining a fundraising list from a charity he founded for political purposes.

It marks the latest legal blow for the GOP chief executive, who is also facing felony invasion of privacy charges for allegedly taking a semi-nude photo of a woman with whom he had an affair.

Missouri Statehouse
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri House and Senate members were able to get some work done this week, despite the time and attention paid to the report that came out Wednesday on Gov. Eric Greitens.

Among the measures passed by the Missouri Senate is a proposed constitutional amendment to change term limits for members of the legislature, allowing them to serve up to 16 years in any one chamber or to divide that time between the House and Senate. Currently they can only serve up to eight years in each chamber.

Gov. Eric Greitens on Wednesday blasted a Missouri House committee report, even before it was released, calling it "filled with lies" and part of a "political witch hunt." April 4, 2018.
Erin Achenbach | St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Rachel Lippmann and Marshall Griffin examine all of the developments in Gov. Eric Greitens’ legal and political saga.

This week’s episode focuses on a House committee report that’s prompting bipartisan calls for Greitens to step down.

Senate Minority Leader Gina Walsh speaks to reporters on April 12, 2018. Walsh doesn't want any bills sent to Gov. Eric Greitens until the impeachment process starts soon.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

Some Senate Democrats don’t want to send any more bills to Gov. Eric Greitens’ desk unless House members begin the impeachment process immediately — as opposed to a special session after May 18.

It’s a sentiment that capped off an emotional day in the Missouri Senate, where lawmakers from both parties lamented on a startling House report on the governor’s conduct.

Scores of reporters look on as House Speaker Todd Richardson addresses the media on April 11, 2018. The release of House report on Gov. Eric Greitens' conduct is opening the door to impeachment proceedings.
Tim Bommel I House Communications

State Rep. Kathie Conway was one of the first Republican lawmakers to suggest that Gov. Eric Greitens resign.

It was a move that set her apart from most of her Republican and Democratic colleagues, many of whom wanted to wait for more information to come out about a 2015 extramarital affair.

Now, high-ranking members of both parties have joined Conway in calling for Greitens to leave after a startling House committee report. But Conway isn’t saying ‘I told you so.’ Instead, she’s lamenting how his refusal to step down may affect the business of state government.

Ed Dowd, defense attorney for Gov. Eric Greitens, speaks to reporters outside the Carnahan Courthouse in downtown St. Louis. March 26, 2018.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The judge in Gov. Eric Greitens’ invasion of privacy trial is ordering attorneys, witnesses and parties to stop talking publicly about certain aspects of the case.

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner sought and received an order from St. Louis Circuit Judge Burlison on Tuesday that prevents “counsel, the parties, and endorsed witnesses” from “making any public statements outside the courtroom regarding the identity of witnesses and their expected testimony, references to specific evidence to be offered at trial, and any personal belief in the defendant’s guilt or innocence.”

Gov. Eric Greitens' defense team outside the Carnahan Courthouse in downtown St. Louis following a hearing. March 26, 2018.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 10 p.m., with comments from Greitens' former mistress' attorney.

A filing from Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ legal team is contending that the woman at the center of his invasion of privacy case may have seen a cell phone as part of a “dream.”

Greitens’ attorneys’ latest filing is getting fierce pushback from the lawyer for his former mistress, who said in a sharply worded statement that the governor's legal team was mischaracterizing her deposition testimony. It's the first time the woman has publicly accused Greitens of taking a photograph without her consent. 

Sen. Jamilah Nasheed
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest episode of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome back Sen. Jamilah Nasheed to the show for the fourth time.

Nasheed represents roughly half of the city of St. Louis. The Democratic official was first elected to her state Senate post in 2012, and was re-elected in 2016.

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri lawmakers worked through dozens of bills this week as the end of the 2018 session starts coming into view.

They include a proposal designed to evenly split most child custody arrangements. The so-called “equal parenting bill” became law in 2016, but supporters of this year’s bill say it’s not being properly enforced in some courts.

Artwork by David Kovaluk
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Jo Mannies and Rachel Lippmann break down all of the developments in the legal and political saga of Gov. Eric Greitens.

This week’s show zeroes in on how a special House committee investigating Greitens is set to release its report in the coming days.

Lt. Gov. Mike Parson introduces Greitens before he makes his State of the State address. (Jan 10, 2018)
Tim Bommel I House Communications

A House committee looking into the conduct of Gov. Eric Greitens will release its report to the public next week.

This comes as the committee is approaching a Sunday deadline to finish its work, which some of Greitens’ attorneys wanted to move.

Sen. Bill Eigel, R-Weldon Spring
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome Sen. Bill Eigel back to the program.

The Weldon Spring Republican represents a portion of St. Charles County in the Missouri Senate. He was elected in 2016 after a hotly contested GOP primary, and a fairly easy general election victory.

MoBikeFed | Flickr

Missouri lawmakers hit the ground running following their annual mid-March getaway.

The House spent the week debating and amending the state budget and passed the nearly $28-billion spending plan on Thursday. It increases K-12 funding by nearly $99 million and restores cuts to higher education proposed earlier this year by Gov. Eric Greitens.

File photo | Carolina Hidalgo I St. Louis Public Radio

Updated March 29 with latest details – Missouri’s budget for fiscal year 2019 is now in the hands of the State Senate, with six weeks before it’s due to be sent to Gov. Eric Greitens.

The roughly $28 billion spending plan would fully fund the state’s K-12 schools, according to Rep. Kip Kendrick, D-Columbia.

Sen. Paul Wieland, R-Imperial, opined on the idea of iron-clad pledges during an interview on his "right to work" vote. While he says he refrains from absolutes, Wieland doesn't envision any scenario where he'd vote for right to work -- which bars arrange
File photo I Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

Control of the United States Senate could depend on how well Democrats like Bob Butler fare in Jefferson County.

That might sound like hyperbole, but it’s not too far from the truth. Butler, an attorney who unsuccessfully ran for the House in 2014 and 2016, is one of two Democrats seeking to oust state Sen. Paul Wieland, R-Imperial.

Democrats like U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill and state auditor Nicole Galloway need strong performances in Jefferson County to win their elections — and will depend on people like Butler to bring Democratic voters to the polls.

Sen. Scott Sifton, D-Affton
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome back Sen. Scott Sifton to the program.

The Affton Democrat (who is now tied with state Treasurer Eric Schmitt for most appearances on the show with five) represents parts of south and central St. Louis County in the Missouri Senate.

File photo | Jo Mannies | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri lawmakers return to Jefferson City next week to begin the second half of the 2018 legislative session.

House Speaker Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluff, said his chamber will spend the bulk of their first week back debating the fiscal year 2019 state budget and voting it over to the Senate.

State Rep. Cloria Brown
File photo I Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

By her own admission, Cloria Brown didn’t expect to get involved in Missouri politics. But after a highly successful business career, Brown felt it was the right time to give back to her community in south St. Louis County.

“I never had any political ambitions,” Brown said during a 2015 edition of Politically Speaking. “But I didn’t want the job to just be given to someone. And I thought I represented the area pretty well. I was doing service, and I said, 'This is another way to serve.’”

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