aerotropolis

Jason Van Eaton, Kit Bond Strategies

Missouri and St. Louis-area leaders are wrapping up a trade mission to China this week designed to revive the so-called China Hub project.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

While in the St. Louis region Tuesday for a press conference on the Share the Harvest program (which you can learn more about below) Mo. Gov. Jay Nixon called his trade trip to China productive - however, he had little to say about whether he wants to renew efforts to get tax credits for a China hub.

The Democrat said his week-long trip resulted in $4.6 billion in export agreements between Missouri and China.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

In August, Gov. Jay Nixon, with much fanfare, called for a special session of the Missouri General Assembly.

So, what's the top priority for everyone? A package of tax credits affectionately known as "Aerotropolis," which would provide incentives for the creation of a hub for Chinese cargo at Lambert Airport.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Nixon to announce details of China trip

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon says state officials expect to finalize billions of dollars of export agreements during an upcoming trade trip to China. Nixon plans to announce more details of the trip today during a visit to a Cargill soybean processing facility in Kansas City.

The governor said Monday the trip will allow the state to sign export agreements with Chinese agencies and provide a chance for numerous Missouri businesses to close deals with Chinese customers.

(via Flickr/dbking)

A Missouri House committee has advanced legislation offering new incentives for some businesses and international exporters.

The vote Wednesday by the House Economic Development Committee could pave the way for the full chamber to debate the bill Thursday.

The plan creates incentives for computer data centers, amateur sports events and air cargo exports at the St. Louis airport. It also scales back some existing tax credits, but not as much as proposed under a version passed last month by the Senate.

Flickr/JimBowen0306

Special legislative session may end unless consensus found in 2 days

Supporters and opponents of the scaled-down tax credit bill spent more than six hours Monday trying to make their respective cases to a Missouri House committee.  Senate leaders slashed $300 million  from the Aerotropolis proposal before passing it, and say that the Compete Missouri provision in the bill can more than make up for the deleted warehouse incentives. 

David Kerr, who heads the state's Economic Development department, testified in favor of the bill.

(UPI/Tom Uhlenbrock)

Updated 5:32 p.m. with reaction from the Mo. House Speaker

A measure that sharply reduces the amount of tax credits available to support the creation of an international cargo hub at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport is in the hands of the Missouri House.

The State Senate approved the measure this morning.

(UPi/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated 9:39 a.m. Sept. 14

A smaller version of the wide-ranging tax credit bill received first-round approval Tuesday in the Missouri Senate.  GOP Senate leaders realized there was not enough support within their own caucus for passing $360 million in air cargo incentives, not to mention a threatened filibuster. 

(via Flickr/Glamour Schatz)

Missouri Senate to debate "Aerotropolis" tax credit today

An analysis shows Missouri could either gain or lose money depending on how a proposed tax credit is implemented for international trade at the St. Louis airport.

Senators met as a large group Monday night to review the cost-benefit projections prepared by the state Department of Economic Development for the so-called "aerotropolis" tax credit.

(via Flickr/dbking)

The Missouri Senate has postponed debate on the massive tax credit bill which includes $360 million for a cargo hub at Lambert Airport in St. Louis.

Debate was set to begin this morning, but some senators asked President Pro-tem Rob Mayer (R, Dexter) for more time to read the 268-page bill, which he granted.

Flickr/jimbowen0306

The legislation contains numerous tax incentives, but also places caps and expiration dates on some frequently used programs.

The bill caps historic preservation tax credits at $80 million per year and low-income housing incentives at $110 million per year. 

Kevin Klingerman with Catholic Charities St. Louis told the committee that capping the circuit breaker tax break for renters would hurt the poor and elderly in Missouri.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

About 30 Tea Party members held a brief rally today inside the Missouri Capitol, where they called on lawmakers to reject the Aerotropolis proposal.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon (D) has officially issued a call for a special legislative session, which will begin at noon on September 6, the day after Labor Day.

Nixon wants lawmakers to take up 11 items during next month’s special session.  As expected, it includes providing tax credits for turning Lambert Airport in St. Louis into an international air cargo hub (the Aerotropolis proposal), and moving the state’s presidential primary from February to March.

(via Wikimedia Commons)

Today the Wall Street Journal ran a story about decreasing prospects for small regional airport's like MidAmerica Airport in Mascoutah, IL.

When it was built over a decade ago MidAmerica was meant to serve as a "reliever" airport for Lambert and nearby Scott Air Force Base.  As the Journal reports, those aspirations have largely failed to pan out, as departures from Lambert have dropped significantly since Sept. 11.

(via Flickr/dbking)

While Missouri legislative leaders have reached an agreement on an economic development package, some lawmakers are speaking out against it.

The key component is the so-called Aerotropolis measure, which would provide $360 million in tax credits to transform Lambert Airport in St. Louis into an international air cargo hub.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The economic development deal struck by lawmakers will cut one of Missouri’s most popular tax credits nearly in half.

The deal between House and Senate leaders would cut the amount of Historic Preservation tax credits issued each year from $140 million down to $80 million.

Ruth Keenoy with the non-profit Landmark Associates of St. Louis, Inc., says the smaller cap would be detrimental to Missouri’s economy.  She wants the incentives to be left as-is.

Nixon outlines plans for 2011 special session

Jul 21, 2011
(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated 3:46 p.m.

St. Louis business leaders are praising a move by state lawmakers and the governor to take up a broad-ranging package of economic incentives.

Governor Nixon announced Thursday that he will call a special session in September to talk address jobs and economic development

Chief among the package is $360 million in tax incentives for Lamber-St. Louis International Airport.

Local control of SLMPD by next year

Jul 20, 2011
Bill Greenblat / UP

According to St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, by this time next year the city could have control of its own police force for the first time since the Civil War.

The announcement came on Wednesday in tandem with an agreement on an package of economic development incentives.

Both issues will be taken up during a special legislative session later this summer.

Slay says the agreement has cleared the way for passage of local control, which now has the backing of the Republican-controlled state House and Senate

(via Flickr/dbking)

Updated 5:26 p.m. with further detail and comment from lawmakers

Updated 2:24 p.m. with statement from office of Gov. Nixon on special session

A statement issued today from Scott Holste, a spokesperson for Mo. Gov. Jay Nixon, announces that the governor will call the Missouri legislature into special session.

The date of the special session has not been determined.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated 7:51 p.m.

A letter from Mo. Gov. Jay Nixon circulated around Twitter this afternoon, and hosted on the Missouri Chamber of Commerce's website, states that Nixon will be leading a Missouri delegation to China "later this year."

According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Nixon's office has confirmed that the trip is in the works.

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