air pollution

EPA-Air Pollution
1:42 pm
Tue August 21, 2012

Court vacates EPA rule limiting cross-state power plant pollution

EPA map showing how air pollution moves between states.
(EPA.gov website)

Updated 4 p.m.

A federal appeals court has vacated an EPA rule that would have limited the amount of power plant pollution that drifts across state lines. The impact of the ruling by the three-judge panel will be felt in Missouri.

The EPA passed the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule last summer.

Read more
Air Pollution
5:48 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Report: Mo, Ill. still among top power plant air pollution states as emissions reduce

Ameren’s power plant near Labadie, Mo.
(VĂ©ronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 6:30 p.m. to add information on mercury pollution.

A new report released today puts both Missouri and Illinois among the top 20 states with the most toxic air pollution from power plants.

The Natural Resources Defense Council report ranked Missouri 15th and Illinois 16th nationwide, based on 2010 data from the Environmental Protection Agency, the most recent data available.

Read more
Air Pollution Standards
5:14 pm
Tue June 26, 2012

Local cement manufacturers may get extra time to meet air pollution standards

Holcim's cement manufacturing plant in Ste. Genevieve.
Holcim U.S. Inc.

The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed to extend the deadline for cement manufacturers to comply with federal air pollution standards.

The extension could impact some local companies.

The EPA proposal would extend the deadline by two years, giving cement manufacturers until September 2015 to comply with the standards.

Read more
Air Pollution Standards
5:54 pm
Wed June 20, 2012

US Senate upholds limits on power plant air pollution

Ameren’s 2,400-megawatt plant near Labadie, Missouri, ranks 2nd highest in mercury emissions nationwide, according to a Nov. 2011 report by the advocacy group Environment Missouri.
VĂ©ronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 5:50 p.m. to add comments from Senator Roy Blunt.

The U.S. Senate has rejected a bill that would have done away with new federal limits on mercury and other toxic air pollutants from power plants.

The resolution introduced by Republican Senator James Inhofe would have eliminated the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards finalized by the Environmental Protection Agency in December.

Missouri’s senators were divided on the issue.

Read more
Air pollution
6:24 am
Mon May 7, 2012

Hot days mean more air pollution – and potential health risks

Air pollution is visible in this view of the St. Louis skyline.
(Missouri Department of Natural Resources)

Warming temperatures may have you wanting to spend more time outdoors. But warm weather can mean more unhealthy air.

Susannah Fuchs of the American Lung Association says our region’s sunny, hot, nearly windless summer weather creates the perfect conditions for the formation of ozone – the main component of smog.

Read more
Climate change - greenhouse gases
2:29 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Power plants top the list of greenhouse gas emitters in St. Louis region, nationwide

A map showing the numbers and locations of Missouri greenhouse gas emitters included in the new EPA data set. You can interact with the map and find more specific data by location and facility via the link in the story below.
(EPA.gov)

Power plants are the largest emitters of greenhouse gases in the U.S., followed by petroleum refineries.

That's according to data released today by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The data set shows 2010 emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other greenhouse gases from more than 6,700 of the largest sources in the U.S., including large industrial facilities and suppliers of certain fossil fuels and industrial gases.

Read more
EPA / Air Pollution
12:52 pm
Wed December 21, 2011

EPA announces first-ever national standards for air pollution from power plants

Ameren’s power plant in Labadie, Mo. which is ranked 2nd highest in mercury emissions nationwide, according to a Nov. 2011 report by Environment Missouri.
(VĂ©ronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated 4:39 p.m.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced the first-ever national standards for air pollution from power plants.

The rule will require Ameren and other electricity companies to reduce emissions of toxic pollutants like mercury and arsenic, which can cause developmental effects, cancer, asthma, and other serious health problems.

Read more
EPA / Air Pollution
4:51 pm
Thu July 7, 2011

EPA sets new air pollution limits for coal-fired power plants

A preview of the EPA's interactive map showing how air pollution moves between states. See a link to the full map in the story below.
(EPA.gov website)

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced new limits on air pollution from coal-fired power plants. The rule aims to lower emissions from power plants in 27 states including Missouri and Illinois.

The goal is to reduce soot (fine particulates) and smog (ground-level ozone) and improve air quality downwind. (Check out this map from the EPA, a preview of which is above, to see how the new limits affect your state).

Read more
Air Quality
9:11 pm
Thu May 19, 2011

Air quality season begins in St. Louis

(Missouri Department of Natural Resources photo)

It's getting warmer in St. Louis and that means the issue of the region's air quality returns to the forefront.

Historically, the area has had pretty poor ozone levels. (Ozone is the main ingredient of urban smog that can be a significant health hazard, particularly for children with asthma.) Susannah Fuchs with the American Lung Association says the region’s air quality has gotten better but it still needs work.

Read more
EPA / Air Pollution
4:05 pm
Wed March 16, 2011

EPA proposes first-ever national air pollution standards for power plants

Ameren’s 2,400-megawatt plant near Labadie, Missouri, is the state’s largest coal-fired power plant.
(VĂ©ronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the first-ever national standards for air pollution from power plants.

The new rules would require many power plants to install technologies to control mercury, arsenic and other toxic air pollutants.

Environment Missouri's Ted Mathys says the new standards would help protect the health of Missourians.

Read more

Pages