Ameren

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Legislation has stalled in the Missouri Senate that would allow investor-owned electric companies to charge consumers for infrastructure improvements.

Opponents argued that Ameren Missouri, Empire District and Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) make enough money to pay for improvements without levying an Infrastructure System Replacement Surcharge (ISRS) on their customers.  Several Senators are blocking the measure, including Republican Rob Schaaf of St. Joseph.

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

A small but vocal group of protesters gathered outside Ameren Missouri's headquarters in St. Louis today to voice their opposition to the company's plans to build several new coal ash landfills.

Updated 3:51 p.m. April 4

Ameren Missouri released a statement today saying that the plant is operating safely, but did not release any further details about those injured. An excerpt of the statement: 

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

A local environmental group filed an appeal this morning in an ongoing effort to keep Ameren from building a coal ash landfill next to its power plant in Labadie.

Last month, a circuit court judge ruled that the Franklin County Commission was in the right when it approved a zoning amendment that would allow construction of the landfill.

But a group of 12 Labadie families, led by the grassroots Labadie Environmental Organization, is challenging that decision.

(via Flickr/Fergus Randall)

One of Illinois's largest natural gas providers is seeking a $50 million rate increase for its 813,000 customers.

Ameren Illinois filed the paperwork requesting the rate case with the Illinois Commerce Commission today. The company says it needs the additional revenue to recoup infrastructure investments and cover the rising costs of delivering natural gas.

This diagram is an excerpt of “figure 1” from Ameren’s “Detailed Site Investigation,” showing the location of the company’s proposed coal ash landfill.
Ameren Missouri

A judge has ruled in favor of an effort to develop a new coal ash landfill in eastern Missouri's Franklin County.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the judge on Friday rejected claims that the Franklin County Commission acted unlawfully in approving a zoning amendment for the landfill.

(via Flickr/[F]oxymoron_0350)

Updated 4:11 p.m. with approximate breakdown of increase for consumers.

Missouri utility regulators have approved a $260 million rate increase for electric customers of Ameren Missouri.

The rate increase approved Wednesday is intended to cover such things as the utility's rising fuel costs, infrastructure improvements, vegetation trimming and storm repairs.

About $90 million of the rate increase goes toward energy efficiency programs that could ultimately save money for residents and businesses.

A collaboration between St. Louis-based Ameren Missouri and Westinghouse Electric Corporation to develop small modular nuclear reactors was passed over Tuesday for initial

funding by the U.S. Department of Energy.

The DOE will, instead, fund a similar project by Babcock & Wilcox and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The Ameren/Westinghouse partnership was seeking $452 million in funding to build the SMR's alongside the utility's Callaway county reactor.

Ameren Missouri

The St. Louis-based utility company Ameren is continuing to rally support for its plan to build small modular nuclear reactors in Missouri.

Together with its partner in the venture, Westinghouse Electric Company, Ameren held what it called a “supplier summit” today in St. Louis.

(National Weather Service)

Updated at 7:50 am Sunday with information about Red Cross volunteers.

Ameren says it is sending more than 100 employees Saturday to New England to help with any problems caused by Hurricane Sandy.

Sandy is expected to be a monstrous storm that poses a serious threat for the entire Eastern Seaboard. Forecasters say Sandy is a massive cyclone, with hurricane-force winds recorded as far as 100 miles away from the eye of the storm.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Ameren monitoring Isaac

Officials with Ameren say they are closely monitoring Hurricane Isaac's progress now that it has made land fall. Projections from the National Weather Service indicate the remnants of the storm could pass over Missouri and Illinois this weekend.

Kevin Anders, Ameren Missouri's manager of distribution services, says that could mean a lot of rain and - potentially - some high winds or tornadoes.

(via Google Maps)

Updated at 3:15 p.m. on Aug. 8, 2012:

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources will hold another public awareness session Aug. 14. This one will focus on the permitting process for a proposed coal ash landfill at Ameren's Meramec power plant near Arnold, Mo.

The proposed landfill site is located at 8200 Fine Road, approximately 3.6 miles southeast of the intersection of Interstate 55 and Route 141. Ameren is preparing a detailed site investigation work plan. The session is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. at Rogers Elementary School, 7700 Fine Road in St. Louis.

Representatives of MDNR and Ameren will be available to answer questions.

Original story posted 5:53 p.m. Aug. 7, 2012:

The St. Louis-based utility company Ameren is proposing to build a coal ash landfill at its Rush Island power plant in Jefferson County, about 10 miles southeast of Festus.

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources is holding a public awareness session tonight to describe the permitting process for the landfill.

(courtesy Ameren)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has put a freeze on issuing licenses for new plants and 20-year renewals for existing ones following a ruling by a federal Appeals Court.

The US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit ruled in June that the practice of allowing nuclear plants to store spent fuel rods on site doesn’t meet federal environmental standards.  The decision in essence bars the awarding of any new licenses until the industry begins addressing the problem of storing nuclear waste.

(via Flickr/spacepleb)

Missouri utility regulators have given approval for what Ameren Missouri calls the most aggressive energy efficiency plan ever in the state.

Under the plan approved Wednesday by the Missouri Public Service Commission, Ameren will invest $147 million over three years in several programs that seek to reduce electricity use by 800 million megawatt-hours.

The plan was part of a negotiated settlement among Ameren, PSC staff, consumer advocates and environmental groups.

(via Flickr/John Picken)

A U.S. Representative from southwest Missouri wants to reduce federal authority over hydroelectric projects.

(courtesy Ameren)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) has announced the formation of a task force to help Missouri land a federal grant to build small modular nuclear reactors, or SMR’s.

The task force is made up of officials from counties adjacent to Ameren Missouri’s Callaway County nuclear plant, which would build the reactors in a joint project with Westinghouse.  Nixon says it’s important to have input from local-level officials.

(Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

The Public Service Commission heard details Monday on Ameren Missouri’s proposed efficiency plan.

The proposal is designed to promote energy efficiency while still allowing the St. Louis-based utility to earn a profit.  It has an estimated price tag of $145 million and it would be paid by the utility’s customers, whose residential bills on average would be about $3 a month higher.  But Ameren Missouri’s Warren Wood says if approved, customers would save money in the long run.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Federal government will not fund reservoir repairs

The federal government has rejected a request from Ameren Missouri to receive stimulus funds for rebuilding the Taum Sauk reservoir that ruptured in 2005.

(via Flickr/Jack W. Reid)

Thermostats turned to extra low and the blistering heat has put added stress on Ameren Missouri's power system.

There have been a handful of small power outages throughout the region, but so far nothing major.  And looking at a week of triple digit high temperatures, Ameren Missouri says it’s ready to take on the extended heat wave.

(courtesy Ameren)

Ameren's request to renew the operating license for its Callaway Nuclear Power Plant with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, for the next 20 years, has garnered another legal challenge.

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