Amnesty International

Ferguson Police Lt. Craig Rettke is confronted by two protestors in the middle of S. Florissant Road Sunday night.
Stephanie Lecci | St. Louis Public Radio

“We really need an investigation, not only of the death of Michael Brown but also of the treatment of peaceful protesters following the shooting,“ Margaret Huang summarized in an interview with  “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh.

Margaret Huang is the deputy executive director of campaigns and programs at Amnesty International USA.  Marva Robinson was in studio as well.  She is the president of the St. Louis Chapter of The Association of Black Psychologists and licensed clinical psychologist at Preston & Associates Psychology Firm LLC.

The panelists of "Ferguson: Where Do We Go From Here?" at the Amnesty International Midwest Conference: Ferguson Township Democratic Committeewoman Patricia Bynes, St. Louis Association of Black Psychologist President Marva Robinson, SLU Law professor Bre
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

To many on the ground in Ferguson, calls to action have evolved into a movement over the past two months. A panel of local organizers discussed what shape that movement should take Sunday at Amnesty International’s Midwest Conference.

The six panelists represented a range of experience—from the political to the legal and psychological—but they all had one thing in common:  a desire for change in the wake of the death of Michael Brown.

For Hands Up United activist and rapper Tef Poe, that means organizing – while leaving space for differences of opinion.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Judge to consider claims of Mo. death row inmate

This week a special judge appointed by the Missouri Supreme Court will start taking another look at evidence used to convict Reggie Clemmons of murder in 1991.  

Yesterday a coalition of local and international activist held a pre-hearing rally in support of Clemmons at Kiener Plaza in St. Louis. 

President of the St. Louis branch of the NAACP, Adolphus Pruitt, said there are lingering questions about the evidence used to convict Clemmons.   

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri officials are both praising and condemning President Obama’s executive order today that halts deportation of teenage and young adult illegal immigrants.