Angel Investment

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House has passed legislation to create tax incentives to lure wealthy high-tech investors to the Show-Me State.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Tax cuts and tax credits were the center of attention at hearings conducted by two Missouri House committees Tuesday night.

First, the House Ways and Means Committee approved this year’s attempt to cut taxes.  House Bill 1253, or the Broad-Based Tax Relief Act of 2014, would tie the state’s income tax rate for business owners to economic growth, dropping the tax rate by 10 percent each year if certain conditions are met, with the ultimate goal of cutting taxes by 50 percent. 

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Even the pull of a Cardinals playoff game and Blues home opener couldn’t keep folks away from yesterday’s StartUp Connection at the St. Louis Science Center.

“We’re obviously getting a crowd that’s passionate about what’s going on here and they can watch baseball and hockey another time,” laughed Phyllis Ellison, managing director of the event, which ran concurrently with the major sporting contests.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: For most people, turning 30 isn’t a cause for festivities.

But for the Arch Angels, hitting $30 million in investment seems as good a reason for a party as any.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When his slide clicker malfunctioned up on stage, Brian Kohlberg kept his cool. Afterward, he was philosophical.

“It was just one of those things I can’t control so I had to keep moving on and show the resilience of our company,” chuckled Kohlberg, founder of Manufacturers' Inventory, an online marketplace for industrial and electrical components. “We’re going to hit some bumps in the road….we’ll still make it through.”

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Supporters of creating a so-called “Angel Investment” tax credit in Missouri testified in favor of legislation Wednesday before a State Senate committee.

Senate Bill 91 would provide incentives to wealthy investors, dubbed “Angels,” who are looking for start-up opportunities, preferably in high-tech and Internet-based businesses.  Kansas City Mayor Sly James was one of several witnesses hoping to persuade committee members to approve the bill.