Anheuser-Busch InBev | St. Louis Public Radio

Anheuser-Busch InBev

Courtesy of Anheuser-Busch

Foaling season at Warm Springs Ranch in Cooper County is over, and there are 28 new members of the Budweiser Clydesdale family to show for it.

Two colts - Danny and Arnold - were the last two babies born at the ranch this year. Supervisor John Soto says the two are "almost twins" - they share a father and were born within minutes of each other,  inspiring Soto to name the foals after the 1988 movie "Twins."

Flickr/brains the head

Debate brewing in Missouri Capitol over birth control

A Senate committee has scheduled a hearing for today on legislation allowing employers to refuse to provide insurance coverage for birth control, abortions or sterilization procedures, if doing so would go against the employer's religious beliefs.

Sponsoring Sen. John Lamping, a St. Louis County Republican, says health insurance is a benefit and that employers should decide how it is structured.

Anheuser-Busch announced Monday that it plans to increase production at its Metal Container Corporation in Arnold, resulting in at least 20 new jobs there.

Metal Container Corporation supplies more than 45 percent of the beer brewer's beer cans and 55 percent of its lids in the United States. It also produces cans and lids for soft drink companies, including PepsiCo and Monster Beverage Corporation.

The expansion announced Monday will add about 100,000 square feet to the Arnold facility. It's expected to be complete in 2013.

(St. Louis Public Radio file photo)

One of the last remaining executives of Anheuser-Busch when it was a stand-alone company has resigned from the brewing giant.

The company announced in a memo today that Dave Peacock, the head of Anheuser-Busch InBev's U.S. market, is resigning "in order to spend more time with his family and pursue other business interests."

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

RCGA: Economic impact of first-round playoffs $5.2 million

The St. Louis Regional Chamber and Growth Association says the economic impact of the Cardinals in the first-round playoffs approaches $5.2 million per game, based on the typical game drawing a capacity crowd.

The association says that if the Cardinals played all possible games through the World Series, the impact would approach that of having the 2009 All-Star Game in St. Louis at more than $56 million.

(via Flickr/ChrisYunker)

A two-year-old gender discrimination lawsuit filed by Francine Katz, once the top female executive at Anheuser-Busch, is finally on its way to trial.

The St. Louis Business Journal reports that the Missouri Supreme Court yesterday upheld a June 14 state appeals court ruling that Katz's case does not have to be settled by arbitration.

(via Flickr/ChrisYunker)

A former top executive at Anheuser-Busch who sued the company for gender discrimination will be able to take her case to trial.

The Missouri Court of Appeals ruled today that Francine Katz's discrimination case does not have to be settled by arbitration. 

From a summary of the ruling, prepared by the Court of Appeals:

Flickr/FiredUpMissouri

All-night Filibuster Ends in Mo. Senate

An all-night filibuster in the Missouri Senate is over. Tuesday afternoon, four Republicans began blocking a capital improvements bill because their attempt to remove $41 million in federal stimulus funds was voted down. The filibuster ended just before 6 a.m. this morning, after an agreement was reached to send more than $14 million back to Washington. That proposal was offered by fellow Republican Brad Lager from Andrew County.

(via Flickr/jennlynndesign)

Missouri Senate Committee to Release Redistricting Map Today

A Missouri Senate committee is preparing to consider a plan for developing new congressional districts. Missouri is losing one of its nine seats in the U.S. House, and the state Legislature is responsible for drawing the boundaries of the eight resulting districts. The Senate committee on redistricting is scheduled to release its proposed map today.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated 5:09 p.m. March 28, 2011 with additional reasons for leaving the board:

The St. Louis Business Journal reports other reasons for Busch's departure:

"For personal and health reasons August Busch IV has decided not to seek re-election at the annual shareholders meeting," A-B spokeswoman Marianne Amssoms said.

As updated 3:30 p.m. March 28, 2011:

The former CEO of Anheuser-Busch Cos., August A. Busch IV, will be leaving the board of Anheuser-Busch InBev following the annual shareholders' meeting, Bloomberg News reports:

The world’s largest brewer will ask investors on April 26 in Brussels to approve Olivier Goudet, chief financial officer of Mars Inc., and Paul Cornet de Ways Ruart as directors for a four-year term, according to the convening notice published on the company’s website. Goudet and Cornet will replace Jean-Luc Dehaene and Arnoud de Pret on AB InBev’s board, which will have 12 members following the departure of Busch.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch, via the Associated Press, reports that the move is unrelated to the negative publicity surrounding Busch since the death of his girlfriend from a drug overdose late last year.

Busch's board seat was always considered a courtesy after Anheuser-Busch was sold to InBev in 2008, as InBev's board went to 13 seats from 12 previously. It will now revert to 12. Busch's term had always been scheduled to end next month, the newspaper said.

 

(via Flickr/Bernt Rostad)

"Chicago's Craft Beer" is the tagline gracing the top of the website of Goose Island Beer Co., but, with an announcement today involving St. Louis fixture Anheuser-Busch, that tagline of origin may become a little muddled.

(via Flickr/zappowbang)

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is citing an Anheuser-Busch InBev can plant subsidiary in suburban St. Louis for several violations after two accidents in which employees suffered amputations.

OSHA said Wednesday that one worker at Metal Container Corp. in Arnold lost fingers in machinery. A second lost a foot in a forklift accident.

(via Flickr/Robert S. Donovan)

Anheuser-Busch InBev reported a 24 percent drop in fourth-quarter profits today, the St. Louis Business Journal reports.

And what are the numbers behind the drop? According to the Business Journal:

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Brewing giant, Anheuser-Busch InBev, is looking to grow its market base in Europe after reports project higher savings than expected.

The producer of hoppy classics like Budweiser and Stella Artois is looking forward to some $.75 billion in savings, says Chief Executive Carlos Brito.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Toxicology results for Adrienne Martin are back, but officials with the St. Louis County Medical Examiner's office are still evaluating those results as they try to determine what killed her.

Martin was the girlfriend of former Anheuser-Busch CEO August Busch IV. She was found dead at his estate on Dec. 19.

Happy New Year's Eve! We hope you have a great end of 2010 and beginning of 2011! Here are a few news stories buzzing around the St. Louis Area today. 

  • Anheuser-Busch will renew its sponsorship with Major League Baseball. According to the St. Louis Business Journal, the St. Louis-based brewer and MLB came to an agreement on Thursday to also drop the litigation stemming from the contract dispute. Anheuser-Busch sued the league last month for allegedly breaching a sponsorship contract after MLB reportedly wanted more money and said the deal was non-binding and it could use other beer sponsors. The deal designates Budweiser as official beer sponsor of Major League Baseball and is worth an estimated $10 million.
  • Smoking bans go into effect Sunday in both St. Louis city and St. Louis County. County residents voted last year to approve the ban. The City's Board of Aldermen passed a ban that was contingent on the county's vote. Both health departments will be in charge of enforcement. The county is not expecting enforcement to be a problem. In the county individuals who don't abide by the ban can be fined $50  while business owners could be fined $100 for the first offense and more for subsequent offenses.
  • The newly approved city budget in East St. Louis calls for laying off 34 municipal employees, including 16 police officers. The Belleville News-Democrat reports the East St. Louis City Council unanimously voted Thursday to accept the nearly $62 million budget. Besides laying off the 16 police officers, the new budget also calls for a delay in calling some firefighters back to work, plus laying off four public works employees, one jailer and one full- and one part-time telecommunicator.

Good morning! Here are some of today's starting headlines:

  • According to the St. Louis  Post- Dispatch, incoming Missouri speaker of the House Steve Tilley says he may refuse to seat a new representative from Kansas City because of allegations of voter fraud in the Democratic primary. Such a move is allowed under Missouri law, but is rare. The Post-Dispatch reports that Tilley was presented this month with a nearly 100 page document alleging widespread voter fraud from failed Democrat candidate Will Royster, who lost he primary in the 40th legislative district to John J. Rizzo by a single vote. Rizzo went on to win the general election against a Libertarian candidate. Tilley's move would cast a light on a a topic Republicans in Missouri have been pushing unsuccessfully for several years; the concept of requiring every voter to present a photo ID when voting. Rizzo called Royster's complaints "sour grapes."
  • Suburban St. Louis police have released a 911 call placed from the home of former Anheuser-Busch CEO August Busch IV earlier this month. A Busch employee called to report a woman who was "just not waking up " and who was later found dead at the home. She's been identified as 27-year-old Adrienne Martin. The cause of death has not been released. Frontenac Police Chief Thomas Becker also said Busch was at home at the time. Busch's lawyer has said there was nothing suspicious about the death.
  • Missouri lawmakers are again seeking ideas from the public for restructuring state government to cut costs. Las year, the Senate took a rare break from formal floor debates to consider ideas for restructuring stat government that were submitted by Missourians. Republican Senate leader Rob Mayer says he plans to do it again in the first weeks of the annual legislative session that starts next month. Mayer, of Dexter, says lawmakers need to consider any idea about how to cut spending. Ideas can be submitted anonymously online at a Senate Web page on rebooting state government.
  • 2011 will see some major work on the Eads Bridge over the Mississippi River. Metro, which owns the bridge, says time and weather have deteriorated the 136-year-old structure. Metro President John Nations says the agency will use $24.5 million in federal stimulus funds to replace and repair structural elements on the bridge, as well as apply a protective coating on the steel.

"We'll also be doing some improvements to our tracks in that area to also enhance our system. So it's going to be a big project and the region, I know, is interested in it. I actually get asked about it a lot simply because the Eads Bridge is such a big symbol for this region and for the Midwest. " - Nations

Nations says the road on the top deck of the Eads will have to be closed for two to three months while the work on the bridge takes place.

Updated 3:14 p.m. Dec. 23, 2010:

The Associated Press reports that the woman found in Busch's home has been identified.

Police and the St. Louis County medical examiner's office on Thursday identified the victim as Adrienne Martin of St. Charles.

An autopsy has been conducted but results could take 4-6 weeks.

St. Louis County forensic administrator Suzanne McCune says there were no signs of trauma.

From Earlier:

(Flickr Creative Commons User nan palmero)

Good morning! Here's a look at the headlines:

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: August 22, 2008 - The deal hasn't been signed yet, but already beer industry experts are predicting that InBev's takeover of Anheuser-Busch will provoke more mergers and acquisitions in a rapidly consolidating industry.

"The targets are obvious," says Benj Steinman, editor of Beer Marketer's Insights, of Nyack, N.Y., which conducts research and publishes reports about the industry. "It's a question of whether they can do it."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 21, 2008 - When Anheuser-Busch and the Teamsters union discussed a contract renewal in 2003, negotiations went smoothly. They started talking in August, reached a tentative agreement in October and signed a deal in early December -- three months before the old contract expired.

Negotiators will return to the bargaining table next month. But 2008 may not be the same as 2003, when a union leader called the contract "a Cadillac plan" and the union membership overwhelmingly supported it.

Clydesdale gets washed down at brewery
Tom Nagel | St. Louis Beacon archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 16, 2008- Seeking to provide a smooth transition, InBev will offer retention bonuses to approximately 360 “key employees” of Anheuser-Busch as the Belgian company acquires the St. Louis company.

The employees’ titles weren’t identified in a document filed by both companies Wednesday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Retention bonuses for top executives are common in mergers and acquisitions.

Boycott in St. Louis? Not so much

Jul 14, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 14, 2008 - Nationally, internet web sites are filled with comments from beer drinkers who say they are switching brands because of the impending buyout.

One, posted by a writer with the screen name "IMCULTEC" on an America On Line site Monday morning, said: "Guess I'll make my own brewskis now. . . don't like foreigners taking over the reins of the Clydesdales. Doesn't feel right. Buy AMERICAN!! At least what's left, that is. Damn this Guberment!"

Does Anheuser-Busch deserve your loyalty?

Jul 14, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 14, 2008 - Loyalty is what many St. Louisans feel - or at least have felt - towards hometown king Anheuser-Busch. No wonder some of us feel burned now that August Busch IV and the rest of the board favor selling to InBev.

Perhaps we should be more careful in the future to distinguish between loyalty as a genuine virtue and loyalty as a marketing device. Yet who can blame us for confusing the two? Blurring that line - getting us emotionally committed to a product - is what modern marketing is all about. And Anheuser-Busch is among the best marketers around.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, July 13, 2008 - InBev raised its offer and Anheuser-Busch raised a flag of truce, agreeing to a $70-a-share buyout. 

Shortly after 11 p.m., Anheuser-Busch announced it had agreed to terms with InBev.

AB across from i-55. 2008. 300 pixels wide
Donna Korando | St. Louis Beacon archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 13, 2008 - There was one strategy, and perhaps only one strategy, that could have kept St. Louis’ Anheuser-Busch King of the Brewing Mountain, immune from its now seemingly inevitable and imminent takeover by InBev of Belgium.

And that one thing, believes William Finnie, is the company having been more aggressive – and much sooner – in the international marketplace.

Hostile InBev takeover could play out in the mail

Jul 10, 2008
anheuser busch eagle.  300 pixels. 2008
Tom Nagel | St. Louis Beacon archive

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 10, 2008 - The next big winner in the battle between Anheuser-Busch and InBev could be the Postal Service. Phone companies and express-mail companies could do nicely, too.

It all depends on how long the companies continue to call each other's increasingly expensive bluffs based on Anheuser-Busch's recent rejection of the Belgian brewer's $65-a-share takeover offer, which InBev still touts as friendly.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 7, 2008 - The battle for Anheuser-Busch accelerated Monday as Belgium’s InBev asked U.S. regulators to allow the St. Louis company’s shareholders to remove all board members. Anheuser-Busch said Monday that InBev’s attempt to replace the board is a “self-serving effort” to promote an offer that is “not in the best interest” of shareholders.

Shareholders deserve “an opportunity to have a direct voice in the proposed combination with InBev,” the Belgian brewer said in a statement. Anheuser-Busch’s board recently rejected a $65-a-share offer.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 1, 2008 - Belgian brewing giant InBev has moved a step closer to making a hostile offer for Anheuser-Busch, complaining that the St. Louis company's new plan for improving earnings and stock price has "significant execution risks."

Meanwhile, some analysts think that if InBev raises its offer too much, it will create financial problems for the combined company.

Just begun to fight: A-B presents its battle plan

Jun 27, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: June 27, 2008 - Seeking to explain why Anheuser-Busch should remain independent, top executives say earnings for the next three years will be well above Wall Street estimates, thanks to the company's revised strategic plan.

These gains will be achieved in part by cutting costs and jobs -- but not by cutting assets, such as the theme parks or the packaging subsidiary, the executives said Friday.

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