Annie Malone | St. Louis Public Radio

Annie Malone

Annie Malone, Josephine Baker, King Baggot, Ginger Rogers and Jane Darwell are just a few people with St. Louis and Missouri ties who have made significant contributions to film.

Diva sweat girls perform at the 2016 Annie Malone Children and Family Service Center's annual May Day Parade.
Wiley Price | St. Louis American

It was clear that John and Carol Hampson had never seen anything like the Annie Malone Children and Family Service Center’s annual May Day Parade as it passed through downtown on Sunday, May 15.

Their eyes beamed with wonder as the British tourists used words like “brilliant” and “quite lovely” – and sometimes “quite brilliant” – to sum up their thoughts as the parade proceeded down Market Street.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

To most St. Louisans, the name Annie Malone conjures up images of a large parade in May. But the organization that hosts that parade, the Annie Malone Children and Family Service Center has been providing services to at-risk children and families for more than a century — 128 years to be exact.

Annie Malone on roof garden of the Poro College Building, 25 April 1927. Photograph by W.C. Persons. Courtesy of the Missouri History Museum.
Courtesy Missouri History Museum

Sunday marks 105 years since the first Annie Malone May Day Parade in St. Louis, making it one of the longest-running African-American parades in the country.

But as another day of marching, music and dance arrives, historians and parade organizers worry that the event is the only association most people have with the name Annie Malone.

Annie Malone Children's Organization will celebrate 125 years of service

Dec 19, 2012
Marquita Farland and her sons (from left) Leondre Clark, 18, and Leondis Clark, 14.
Virginia Gilbert | For the St. Louis Beacon

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: One hundred and twenty five years ago Sarah Newton Cohron and other African-American teachers in the local segregated schools started a campaign to establish the St. Louis Colored Orphans Home.

“We should by all means look into conditions of the Colored orphans of the city,” said Julia Casey, according to the Feb. 23, 1887, minutes of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union. “Do, ladies, take some action. … We have left it to others long enough.”