Arts & Culture

Famed choreographers Dianne McIntyre and Bebe Miller discussed their parts in Dance St. Louis' production of New Dance Horizons IV.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Dance St. Louis’ fourth installment of “New Dance Horizons” celebrates Black History Month. It will highlight the works of three nationally-renowned African-American choreographers inspired by those who came before them.

Miles Davis and Maya Angelou were two such artists with St. Louis ties that inspired choreographers Bebe Miller and Dianne McIntyre, respectively, as they created pieces that will be performed by St. Louis dancers this weekend.

OakleyOriginals | Flickr | http://bit.ly/1Qd8rzx

Prolific writer Howard Megdal, whose work has appeared in Sports Illustrated, The New York Times, USA Today, among others, just released his fourth book “The Cardinals Way: How One Team Embraced Tradition and Moneyball at the Same Time.” In it, he details how the Cardinals franchise has been able to embrace both “moneyball” and tradition to become one of the most beloved and successful teams in the sport.

"Captain" Tim Woodson shows off his pirate ship at the Progressive Insurance St. Louis Boat and Sportshow.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Tim Woodson developed a pretty unique skill: He creates pirate ships.

The St. Louis native has spent the last six years entertaining children at the Progressive Insurance St. Louis Boat and Sportshow. He’s even been able to sell some of his creations to a few of the tens of thousands of people who venture to event at the America’s Center and Edward Jones Dome.

On Chess: Women and the power of the queen

Feb 25, 2016
Jean Hoffman views the exhibit: Ladies' Knight: A Female Perspective on Chess
Austin Fuller | Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

Known by many as a game of war and kings, the chess world is often perceived as male-dominated. Today, less than 14 percent of the members of the United States Chess Federation (USCF) are female, and only one woman ranks in the top 100 chess players in the world. However — in spite of the underrepresentation of female players within today’s competitive chess world — women have played a central role in the development of the modern chess game.

Brian Cohen, LouFest Founder
Provided by Brian Cohen

Brian Cohen, one of the founders of the LouFest Music Festival, is leaving to start a new venture with the Cortex Innovation Community. The new enterprise will be aimed at showcasing various innovative projects from the city’s tech, science, art, and music communities.

Steph Perkins
Provided by PROMO

PROMO, Missouri's statewide advocacy organization for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality, has named Steph Perkins, 31, as its new Executive Director.  

Perkins has been with the organization for seven years. The new Executive Director said he intends to pay attention to issues like discriminatory legislation and health care as well as day-to-day inequalities. 

St. Louis has an active Polish community. On Wednesday's "St. Louis on the Air," we'll be talking about it.
Dan Markye | Flickr | http://bit.ly/1VCzpEo

You may have heard the oft-repeated statistic that “Chicago has the largest population of Polish people outside of Warsaw.” As WBEZ pointed out last year, that may not be entirely true. While St. Louis certainly does not have the same number of Poles as Chicago or New York, we do have an active Polish community.

On Tuesday's 'St. Louis on the Air,' clinical psychologist Suma Chand will discuss overcoming fears and phobias, such as spiders.
Jake Vince | Flickr | http://bit.ly/1oDwd14

Airplanes. Insects. Rabid bears. Needles. There are millions of things to be scared of in everyday life but, for some, fears and phobias dominate the mind. Suma Chand, a clinical psychologist and associate professor in psychiatry with Saint Louis University, helps patients with phobias and fears overcome them.

St. Louis is host to over 40 comic creators. We talked to two of them in-studio and more online today.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Comics are no longer solely relegated to syndicated placement in newspapers or in comic books—the increasing popularity of the World Wide Web changed that. Today, you’re just as likely to find a comic you love on a Tumblr, Facebook page, or webpage than in a comic book shop. These web comics (that come in strips, series, and serials) are often an entry for women and people of color into the world of comics and comic book publishing — a field typically dominated by white men.

Steven Louis Brawley and Nancy Fowler.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Author Steven Louis Brawley said that at the first Pride parade held in St. Louis, in 1980, many participants had to disguise themselves with painted faces and masks as they were worried about what repercussions revealing their sexual orientation would have.

Times have changed. On June 25, 2014 four same-sex couples married in St. Louis City Hall despite Missouri’s constitutional ban on gay marriage. A little over a year later, on July 26, 2015, the Supreme Court struck down state bans on same-sex marriage, ensuring same-sex couples could marry the country over. 

Soldiers Memorial
Susan Hegger | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis residents have less than a week left to visit the Soldiers' Memorial Military Museum downtown before it closes Feb. 28 for two years, until 2018.

“It’s a very significant moment for the Soldiers' Memorial because it means the start of the complete renovation,” said Karen Goering, director of operations.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for February 21, 2016 will present the third part of a five-part series on “Jazz Families: Blood Relatives.”  There are an amazing number of jazz musicians who have blood relatives (mothers, fathers, siblings) who are also jazz musicians.  This show will have music from our own Singleton Palmer Dixie Six with Ben Thigpen, Ben’s son Ed Thigpen, our own Jeter-Pillars Orchestra, the Quintet of the Hot Club of France with the Reinhardt brothers, the Marsala brothers, the Montgomery brothers, Red and Whitey Mitchell, Bud and Richie Powell, Stu and Claude Williamson, Charl

Provided by The Coliseum Ballroom Documentary Project

They’ll be rocking to the oldies Saturday night at the civic center in Gillespie, Ill., where a crowd of a certain age will gather to share memories of the old Coliseum Ballroom, which was destroyed by fire in 2011.

Music director David Robertson conducts the St. Louis Symphony.
St. Louis Symphony

Updated Feb. 19, 2016 at 2:00 p.m. with audio from "St. Louis on the Air" – Look for the St. Louis Symphony to leave the ground and fly high in its 2016-17 season — a season that could be described, in part at least, as music in flight. 

This is the orchestra’s 137th season; the repertory for it was announced this morning by SLSO Music Director David Robertson and Symphony President and CEO Marie-Hélène Bernard. There's another milestone: Robertson himself chalks up a dozen career years on Grand Boulevard as maestro of the St. Louis orchestra. That, in a peripatetic era, is a statistic that soars on its own, and one cheered not only by St. Louis audiences but audiences all over the country and abroad, as well.

Left to right: "Meltdown" "Puzzled" and "Missing Piece" by Judith Shaw. "Cover-Up," embellished with Band-Aids and "Figured Out," which has no adornment, are two more pieces in the show.
Judith Shaw

For most of her life, Judith Shaw didn’t think she had a problem with food and she certainly didn’t consider herself artistic.

Then 10 years ago at the age of 53, the Clayton resident sought treatment for her anorexia. She responded to one therapeutic assignment by tracing her gaunt pound body and gluing words like “help” and “pain” to the outline. Later she traced her fuller figure and added things like puzzle pieces.

“I’m spilling my guts in pictures and words and shapes and forms,” Shaw said.

‘Many people have a hole’

Laura Heidotten | St. Louis Public Radio

Tattarrattat —  a word created by James Joyce in his opus Ulysses is a palindrome that refers to the specific rhythm of someone knocking on a door. For this week’s Audio Agitation, we take "tatarrattat" as our guiding light, our investigation of rhythm as it appears in instrumental melodies. 

Audio Agitation presents songs that dart from cluttered to classical, sweet to strange.

Image from Forever: The Campaign for Forest Park's Future
Provided by Michael Eastman and Forest Park Forever

Forest Park Forever is celebrating its 30th anniversary by giving three artists $3,000 each.

The money is a stipend for three, three-week-long residencies in the park from May to September. Stephen Schenkenberg, the organization’s strategic communications director, says the project’s intended to answer the question:

“How can we celebrate in a way that the community ultimately gets something new, someone’s new interpretation or expression of what the park means?”

Lazarus, a male Mexican wolf, at the Endangered Wolf Center in Eureka.
Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio

Volunteer Lisa Houska is hunkered down next to a tall cyclone fence at the Endangered Wolf Center in Eureka. She’s peering at a hillside, observing a handsome pair of thick-furred Mexican wolves and their three pups that were born last year.

“We’re watching Sibi and Lazarus. This is their second breeding season,’’ Houska whispers.

For two hours on this unseasonably warm winter morning she’ll sit motionless, trying not to disturb the family. She’s hoping to witness another successful courtship between mom and dad.

A dinner party with Isaac (Jonathan C. Kaplan), Jory (Rachel Christopher), Emily (Leigh Williams) and Amir (John Pasha) in The Rep's "Disgraced" starts off on a friendly note but soon takes a different turn.
Peter Wochniak / ProPhotoSTL.com

This year’s most widely produced play in the country is on stage right now at the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis. 

“Disgraced” centers on an ambitious New York attorney grappling with his Islamic roots in a post-9/11 world. But the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama is really about everyone’s American experience, people of all faiths or no faith, according to playwright Ayad Akhtar.

School programs increase interest in chess and help with confidence.
Austin Fuller | Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

The Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis has been running after-school scholastic chess programs in community centers and schools in the area since 2008. Last fall, 1,100 students participated in after-school programs at more than 50 schools across 14 school districts.

The work in "Visualizing Life: Social Justice in Real Time" includes that of (left to right) Howard Barry, Annetta Bentil and Gundia Lock-Clay.
Freida Wheaton

What do you call a group of visual artists inspired by the death of Michael Brown and the social-justice movement it spawned? St. Louis curator Freida Wheaton calls them the “Sweet 16.”

It’s a nod to their numbers as well as a reference to their niche. On Feb. 26-27, you can see the work of these St. Louis artists at the Touhill, in conjunction with “New Dance Horizons IV.”

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

American soccer defender Lori Chalupny is a 2015 World Cup champion and 2008 Olympic gold medalist who also got her start right here in St. Louis. A few months ago, Chalupny announced her official retirement from the sport…but not completely.

Greg Rannells

The James Beard Foundation today announced the semifinalists for its prestigious awards that honor the best in the restaurant and bar industry. The St. Louis area is well represented. 

Leading this year’s pack locally is first-time semifinalist chef Mike Randolph, who is up for Best Chef: Midwest. Randolph’s restaurant, Público, in University City, is also up for Best New Restaurant. Randolph also owns Randolfi's in University City and Half and Half in Clayton.

Texas Room recording Session
Provided by Jarred Gastriech

Last year local musician Louis Wall decided to record and produce an album pairing St. Louis-born with immigrant musicians. At the time, he didn’t know it would expand to include roughly 50 people from 15 countries across five continents. Wall says the key to making an album with that many contributors is keeping it accessible to everyone.

“I mean, this is probably just pop music 101, but it’s having people relate to many broad things,” he said.

Artisan bread crafted by Union Loafers, located in the Botanical Heights neighborhood of St. Louis.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

“Bread is the staff of life,” or so the Biblical saying goes, and St. Louis has a lot of restaurants and bakeries working (literally) around the clock to produce some fine loaves for locals to munch on.  Artisanal bread is considered au courant across the country right now, and Sauce Magazine recently profiled five establishments that are producing such bread in “Loaves We Love.”

Merve Bedir and Jason Hilgefort explore the PXSTL space
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

UPDATE:

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation has announced the winners of its public art contest. 

Architect Amanda Williams and artist Andres Hernandez will work with Sam Fox School of Design Students to build a structure on a temporary lot across the street from the museum.

The project will be completed sometime next year.  

Original Story

St. Louis Public Radio | 90.7 KWMU announced today that Shula Neuman has been named executive editor.  Neuman, who served as interim editor since the retirement of Margaret Freivogel in January of 2016, joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2013 as the editor of the organization’s health, science, education and race beats. This is Neuman’s second stint with St. Louis Public Radio.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for February 14, 2016 is the second ina five-part series on “Jazz Families: Blood Relatives.”  There are an amazing number of jazz musicians who have blood relatives (mothers, fathers, siblings) who are also jazz musicians.  This show will have music from the St.

Composer Francis Pott and Phillip Barnes, aristic director, Saint Louis Chamber Chorus.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Love is not all sunshine and roses, especially when it comes to Valentine’s Day. That is something Saint Louis Chamber Chorus artistic director Phillip Barnes was very aware of when booking this year’s concert to be held on Feb. 14 at Second Presbyterian Church.

Principal dancer Makensieie Howe in Saint Louis Ballet's "In It For Love."
Saint Louis Ballet

This Valentine’s Day, Saint Louis Ballet is “In it for the Love” with contemporary flair and a world premiere of a piece set to Beatles music.

St. Louis area native and principal dancer Makensie Howe joined “St. Louis on the Air” contributor Steve Potter to discuss the world premiere and the company. 

Choreographer and former New York City principal dancer Christopher d’Amboise is the mastermind behind the Beatles-themed piece entitled “Bedtime Stories,” which also features fun sleep-themed costumes.

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