Arts & Culture | St. Louis Public Radio

Arts & Culture

If an art museum exhibition had the name of artist Monet, Picasso or Raphael in it, that would probably be enough to draw a crowd, but that's not usually the case. Unique titles are a huge draw for attendance at museum exhibitions.

 I give the award for best titles for visual art exhibitions to Art Saint Louis, a local art institution in downtown Saint Louis whose mission is to enrich lives through creative activity of our region's contemporary visual artists.

Artists create work that explores the edges of St. Louis

Dec 1, 2017
People gather inside a giant inflatable bubble to listen to presentations about art
Provided by Gavin Kroeber

As the sun sets, several people circle around giant plastic disk laid out behind the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts. The disk inflates and attendees are invited to walk back and forth as it grows into a massive bubble.

Adults giggle as performers run around the inflated orb before inviting people inside for an installment of “At the Edge of Everything Else,” a creative soiree hosted by artist and organizer Gavin Kroeber. It’s part of a project to highlight art rooted in the urban fabric of St. Louis.

Magnus Carlsen (right) and Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, the two grand masters battling for the Grand Chess Tour 2017 crown
Lennart Ootes | Grand Chess Tour

The nine annual London Chess Classic will take place in the Olympia Exhibition Center in London from Dec. 1-11. Once again, it will be the final stop of the 2017 Grand Chess Tour and will produce this year’s winner. It has all come down to this event as the players will battle it out one last time for tour points, a $300,000 prize fund and a $150,000 bonus for the top two finishers of the tour. Of course, the much coveted titles of tournament winner and GCT champion will be on the line as well.

The word Monaco is laid out across a photo of a large 1-story brick and glass building.
Provided by Monaco

Fourteen St. Louis artists are opening a gallery that will put them directly in touch with art buyers. The space will be run by the artists and will function somewhat like a co-op.

But instead of seeking non-profit status as artist run spaces  typically do, Monaco will be a commercial gallery. Exhibiting artists keep 100 percent of their proceeds. 

CAM St. Louis' chief curator Wassan Al-Khudhairi talks about Iraqi artist Hayv Kahraman's orchestrated perfomance.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Iraqi-born artist Hayv Kahraman creates performance based on collective memories

This segment will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Wednesday. This story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked to Wassan Al-Khudhairi, chief curator of the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (CAM) about an orchestrated performance by Iraqi-born artist and refugee Hayv Kahraman.

Jane Pauley

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, producer Alex Heuer spoke to journalist and author Jane Pauley about her journalism career, fake news and more.

Pauley hosts CBS’ "Sunday Morning." She began her network career in 1976 as co-host of "Today" on NBC, a tenure spanning 13 years. She also co-hosted "Dateline" and many other news programs.

Pauley will be in St. Louis as part of the St. Louis Speakers Series on Dec. 5.

Author Mark Leach details discoveries of St. Louis' ancient Native American civilzation.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

When it comes to ancient civilizations, St. Louisans can find one in their own hometown. Centuries ago, a well-established society left wonders, most notability, the Cahokia Mounds.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with author Mark Leach, a Native American mound preservationist.

Leach’s latest book, "The Great Pyramids of St. Louis: An Ancient Metropolis” details the history of the mounds and the culture of the Native American population.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited FOR Sunday, November 26, 2017 will be “The Keys and Strings Hour (Jim Hall) Plus New Music.”  I have always been fascinated by the sound and conception of guitarist Jim Hall, who will be featured on the “Keys and Strings Hour.”  Hall will be heard in duos, a trio, piano quartets and a quintet featuring such artists as Ron Carter, Charlie Haden, Pat Metheny, Hampton Hawes, Geoff Keezer and Red Mitchell, who will be playing cello.  New music will be heard by the Canadian pianist Nick McLean, Bill Charlap, Cecile McLorin Salvant, Joey Alexander, Christian McBride and hi

Indoor golf is coming to The Sheldon Art Galleries in summer 2018.
Provided | Scott MacLeod | Flickr

A St. Louis institution known for displaying paintings will temporarily change its focus to putt-putt next summer.

In June, all 6,000 square feet of The Sheldon Art Galleries will become a mini golf course.

Visitors can actually play the course, Sheldon Director Olivia Lahs-Gonzales said.

“Usually, you go into an art gallery and you’re not allowed to touch anything,” Lahs-Gonzales said. “This is an opportunity to be immersive, to have an immersive experience.”

Several suits made of different fabric types, including plastic and cloth, hang over individual florescent lights.
Provided by Michael DeFilippo

As you walk down the street, you might not realize that you’re on a giant rock hurtling through the galaxy at amazing speeds. That is to say, you’re standing in space. An show at Projects+Gallery, 4733 McPherson Ave., could help viewers confront this reality.

“Where you’re standing right now, you are not separated from outer space,” artist Christine Corday, said with a laugh. “You are absolutely positively in outer space.”

Parishioners pray during a Sunday morning Mass at Our Lady of Guadalupe in Ferguson on Nov. 19, 2017.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

In this week when many St. Louisans and others around the country gather for the Thanksgiving holiday, before they dive into the turkey and pumpkin pie, they will pray.

But why? Why does prayer remain so important to many people at a time when, according to the Pew Research Center, the number of U.S. adults who do not identify with any organized religion is growing?

It’s mostly because prayer is a given for people who follow almost any faith tradition, according to Shane Sharp, an associate professor of sociology at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb.

St. Louis poet Mary Jo Bang discusses her latest poetry work, "A Doll for Throwing."
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with author and Washington University professor Mary Jo Bang about her work and new poetry collection, “A Doll for Throwing.”

(L-R) Fran Hamilton, Christan Perona and Kharis Perona discuss The Grannie Annie organization's mission to preserve family stories.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Often times, when a person passes away, their story dies with them. But a local non-profit organization hopes to keep those memories alive. 

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about The Grannie Annie Family Story Celebration and the role it plays in encouraging young people to preserve their families' stories.

The organization helps children discover, write and share stories from their family's history, and then publishes illustrated collections of their work.

Two blue faces framed by jagged wood pieces rest on a bed of brick laid across a pedistal.
Provided by St. Louis Lambert International Airport

Holiday travelers will have a chance to see new art at the St. Louis Lambert International Airport this week.

At a time when many likely view the city as divided divided along political, economic and social lines, the exhibit in Terminal 1 aims to draw attention to the camaraderie and collaborative spirit that dominate the city’s art scene.

Sauce Magazine is out with their 2017 Guide to the Holidays.
(Courtesy: Sauce Magazine)

Thanksgiving Day is one of the biggest days of the year for cooking and entertaining. Our friends at Sauce Magazine are back for our monthly edition of Sound Bites and have tips for cooking, hosting and attending events this Thursday.

Cuban Jazz Musicians

Nov 20, 2017

For November 19, 2017, Jazz Unlimited preented "Cuban Jazz Musicians."   Jelly Roll Morton called the Cuban influence on jazz “The Spanish Tinge.”  These musicians have been involved in jazz since the beginning.  Cuban Albert Socarras played the first jazz flute solo in 1927. The music by Socorras, Chucho Valdes, Chano Pozo, Dafnis Prieto, Hilario Duran, Mongo Santamaria, Machito, Irakere, Arturo Sandoval, Paquito D'Rivera, Mario Baiza, Gonzalo Rubalcaba, Candido Camero, Chico O'Farrill, Harold Lopez-Nussa, Fabian Almazan and Alex Acuna was heard.

(L-R) Brian Elsesser, Beverly Brennan and Bobby Norfolk talk about a local production featuring work from the Harlem Renaissance.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Anyone who’s spent time in New York City knows that if you want to get to Harlem, you take the A train. That is the title of a special program paying tribute to the Harlem Renaissance – when black entertainment culture exploded in Harlem in the form of poetry, music and comedy.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about a local production celebrating the artistic achievements of African-Americans during the Harlem Renaissance. It will feature jazz, blues, poetry and storytelling.

Jazz singer Cecile McLorin Salvant
Mark Fitton | Courtesy of the artist

When jazz vocalist Cecile McLorin Salvant takes the stage Saturday at the Sheldon Concert Hall in St. Louis, she won't be trying to sing as her storied predecessors might have.

Though the virtuoso performer has been hailed as a successor to such greats as Ella Fitzgerald and Betty Carter, she is very much a contemporary singer. Salvant, a Haitian-American who grew up in Miami, has grown to love jazz standards, show tunes and songs many might miss, like the Kurt Weill/Langston Hughes piece "Somehow I Could Never Believe."

But the 28-year-old also writes original compositions and through her singing wants to make her own statement about the music's past, present and future.

One of 45 images selected for display at the organizations new space.
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

While selecting images for the art show “On the Street Where I Live,” Amanda Verbeck of Pele Prints saw certain themes emerge in artists submissions: impermanence, restlessness, transition and instability.

She wants the show at Webster Arts to explore the places where people live and their relationships with their neighbors.

Theckla Mehta (left) and Nartana Premachandra (right) talk about Dances for India's upcoming 40th anniversary performance.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Classical Indian dance is a traditional art form with roots in India that date back over 2,000 years. The rhythmic dance often tells stories with body movements, facial expressions and symbolic clothing.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked to Dances of India members about the history and tradition of their dance. The company was founded in St. Louis in 1976 and was the first of its kind established in Missouri. 

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