Arts & Culture

The Trombones of the St. Louis Symphony

The Trombones of the Saint Louis Symphony may be known for their spectacular performances of works by composers like Rimsky-Korsakov, Dukas or Mozart but that’s not all this quartet has up its sleeves. The ensemble will soon feature two world premieres and a new arrangement of Radiohead’ “Everything in its Right Place.”

Yes, you read that right, Radiohead.

A concerned Curious Louis community member, Dee, asked a great question about accountability:

 

Does Curious Louis need to get more sponsors so you can afford the resources needed to answer more of these questions?

Dee continues, "I really enjoy Curious Louis, but they seem to be struggling to keep up with the inquiries."

More resources? Who wouldn't turn down more resources? While more sustaining members to support our work is wonderful (donate here), sometimes our newsroom is just short on time.

 

 

Here's what we can do to keep you informed about the Curious Louis reporting process and what you can do to help it work better.

Fans and camera crews surround the band Madisen Ward and the Mama Bear's performance
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s 9:30 on Saturday morning and there’s a garage rock band playing in a flower shop and plant nursery on Cherokee Street. Half an hour later another group performs in front of a group of kids in a chemical safety office.  By mid-afternoon bands have played in bike shops, feminist sex stores, micro-breweries and clothing stores along Cherokee Street. It’s all part of Lo-Fi Cherokee. 

“It’s like a marathon of shooting music videos,” said Lo-Fi attendee Adam Ballard.

Image of the author Brian Blanchfield
Provided by Brian Blanchfield

Award-winning poet and essayist Brian Blanchfield gave himself a strange set of requirements for his new book "Proxies: Essays Near Knowing" – write essays purely from memory. Do not check book titles or apartment locations. Stay away from Google.  Fact check nothing – at least until the end.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for April will be “The Career of Geri Allen.” Geri Allen was born Pontiac, MI.  Her family moved to Detroit.  She is a graduate of Cass Technical High School, whose music program has produced so many jazz musicians.  She has an AB in jazz from Howard University and an MS in ethnomusicology from the University of Pittsburgh.  In addition to her performing career, she is now an Associate Professor and jazz studies director at the University of  Pittsburgh.  We will be heard with her own trios and small groups and in addition with Wallace Roney, Charles Lloyd, Roy Brook

Cherokee Jeremy Thigpen dances a warrior dance.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Because this region was the home of ancient burial mounds built by the Mississippian people almost a thousand years ago, Basmin asked Curious Louis what efforts are being made to help American Indians today reconnect with their heritage.

"STL: recognized as a gathering place & Sacred ground to US First Nations. What efforts are being made to reconnect People here today?"

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Krista Tippett imparts the wisdom of the world’s great thinkers every week through her radio program On Being, but she wants you to take away something a little bit different from her new book, “Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living.”

“Wisdom is not for the wise sages of history,” Tippett told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh. “Wisdom is something that is accessible to us and it emerges through the raw materials of our lives.”

Kim Furlow and Emily Baker during a rehearsal of "A Comfortable Fit," part of the "Briefs" festival of LGBT plays
Briefs festival

St. Louis’ annual “Briefs” festival of LGBT plays is toasting its success this weekend.

During the event’s five years, audiences have grown and the festival has moved into a larger space. The number of  submissions has increased, and more esteemed playwrights and actors are participating. This year’s playwrights include Kansas native James Still, who was nominated twice for a Pulitzer Prize and three times for an Emmy Award.

DeAnia, a junior in the College Bound program, looks around at works of art she can see through WoofbertVR virtual reality goggles.
Howard Lerner | DecemberPress

An art-related virtual reality system is taking some St. Louis students to places filled with beauty and inspiration without their having to move any distance at all.

Camping tent
Arup Malakar |Flickr|http://bit.ly/208olRZ

When climber Scott Briscoe was in high school, he got involved with the genre of physical activity known as “adventure sports.” You know:  hiking, skiing, backpacking, kayaking, rock climbing, and the like. He loved these kinds of sports, but there was something missing from the experience — people who looked like him.

Grant's Farm bridge with sign thanking attendees for visiting
William K. Busch Brewing Company

The saga over who will own Grant’s Farm continues. Four Busch family siblings have offered to purchase the farm for $26 million and continue operations as they currently exist. 

In an announcement the siblings said public response to the ongoing question of ownership motivated their offer.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

If you’re stressed and need a moment of calm, do yourself a favor and skip through this text straight to the audio. The sounds of Mark Holland and Pati Pellerito’s Native American flute and Himalayan singing bowls will almost immediately lower your blood pressure. Just ask St. Louis on the Air contributor Steve Potter.

The two artists have recently collaborated on a new CD of such meditative music entitled “Dreamwalker.” Pellerito, a massage therapist and sound healer, plays a range of six to over 40 bowls while Holland plays the wooden flute.

Joseph Leahy | St. Louis Public Radio

Paul McCartney will return to St. Louis this summer, 50 years after the Beatles’ first rocked old Busch Stadium. 

The St. Louis Cardinals are planning host McCartney’s One on One tour Aug. 13 in the new Busch Stadium.

U.S. Chess Hall of Fame inductees Maurice Ashley, left, and Gata Kamsky
Spectrum Studios

The chess world currently has a very brief hiatus between world class events. The Candidate’s Tournament has just finished, and while Grandmaster Sergey Karjakin prepares to face reigning World Champion Magnus Carlsen in New York in November, the Americans are coming back to their home city to fight for another prestigious title: the U.S. Championship.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Susan Gobbo, a native of Brazil, moved to the United States in 2005 and then to St. Louis in 2008 with her husband, who was offered a position stateside with Nestle Purina. Sounds like an exciting move, right?

One problem: Gobbo, a trained and licensed physical therapist in her home country, was not able to find a physical therapy job in the United States because many medical facilities viewed her as unqualified. The costs for training and recertification were high, so Gobbo’s high expectation of life in the U.S. deflated a little bit.

Images from zoo museum district entities
File photos and Wikipedia

New questions are being raised regarding the Zoo Museum District and how it evaluates subdistricts. Former Board Member Gloria Wessels is concerned the ZMD’s examinations aren't in depth enough.

“The way they look over the budgets now is just cursory,” she said.

Current board member and Audit Committee Chairperson Robert Eggmann says the new procedures are more rigorous in some ways.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

The Sound Bites team at Sauce Magazine is back and ready to help you plan your nights out at St. Louis restaurants during the month of April.

Meera Nagarajan and Kristen Schultz, the magazine’s art director and staff writer, respectively, joined “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh to discuss the openings and closings of restaurants you should know.

The three restaurants they highlighted?

Future home of .ZACK
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

The Kranzberg Arts Foundation is developing the new multi-media arts space called .ZACK (pronounced Zack). Kranzberg Arts Foundation’s Director of Operations Chris Hansen said the project will help develop the broader St. Louis theater scene.

“There needs to be a synergy in this new theater district that we’re developing here in Grand Center” he said. “It becomes a place where the performing arts world not only works but they start to build community and fellowship.”

This group of 40 students from Arthur Smith Middle Magnet School in Alexandria, La., stopped by the Griot Museum of Black History last week on a spring break trip.
The Griot Museum of Black History

Things are looking up for St. Louis’ struggling Griot Museum of Black History.

Last fall, Griot founder Lois Conley could barely pay the bills. Plunging attendance meant the museum was only open three days a week. But so far this year, the number of visitors has at least doubled. Conley doesn’t have a hard figure because she hasn’t had time to add up the numbers.

“We’ve just been too busy,” she said. “We were open every day in February and had visitors every day."

Cantor Howard Shalowitz and Rabbi Yosef Landa lead a burial service for an unknown Holocaust victim on Sunday, April 3, 2016 at Chevra Kadisha Cemetery in St. Louis County.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

A victim of the Holocaust has found a final resting place at a Jewish cemetery in St. Louis more than 70 years after World War II.

On Sunday members of the St. Louis Jewish community held a burial service for human remains found at Dachau concentration camp in 1945.

Blues musician Bobby Rush, museum leaders and Mayor Francis Slay celebrate the opening of the National Blues Museum on Saturday, April 2, 2016.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

The National Blues Museum — a sensory rich, colorful homage to blues music — is now open in downtown St. Louis.

A crowd of people attended the long-awaited grand opening Saturday, lining up down the 600 block of Washington Avenue to be the first to see the new exhibits.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, April 3, will be “The Career of Ron Carter.”  Ron Carter is the most recorded bassist in jazz.  In his 50-year career, he has played with just about everybody.  This show includes Carter’s playing with Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock, Jim Hall, Benny Carter, The Great Jazz Trio, Bill Evans, Stan Getz, Eric Dolphy, T.S. Monk, The Kronos Quartet, Tadd Dameron, Tommy Flanagan, Kenny Barron, Geri Allen, Gil Evans, Abby Lincoln, McCoy Tyner, Andrew Hill, Chick Corea, Joe Henderson, Shirley Horn, St. Louis' own Fred Tompkins and Freddie Hubbard. 

Provided by David Anderson

The Tritone Expo focuses on instrument makers, recording studio representatives, and accessory manufacturers. Organizers hope it will unite different aspects of the St. Louis music scene.

“We have a whole slew of people here who are ostensibly an army of one, and we're trying to create a community around that,” said organizer Michael Tomko, “We’re showing how legitimate these companies are at manufacturing, as startups here in town.”

Jazz Unlimited host Dennis Owsley
St. Louis Public Radio file photo

The Jazz Journalist’s Association has named Dennis Owsley the second Jazz Hero from the St. Louis region.  He’s recognized in part for his radio show, Jazz Unlimited, with St. Louis Public Radio.

“The way he puts it together in formats and themes, it can be really educational not only for hardcore jazz fans but people who are just coming into jazz,” said Terry Perkins, who oversees the JJA award in St. Louis.

National Blues Museum

Rob Endicott is a classically trained trumpeter and blues musician in his own right. For the forseeable future, however, he has donned a different hat: Board Chairman of the National Blues Museum, which has its grand opening on Saturday.

“It touches something deep in the American soul, this music,” Endicott told St. Louis on the Air contributor Steve Potter.

"Pretty Girl," "Pilgrim" and "Storyteller" are all photographs in the “Legends of the 36 Unknown” exhibition by Todd Weinstein.
Todd Weinstein

A photographer’s search for meaning is the seed of an exhibition opening Sunday on the campus of the St. Louis Jewish Community Center.

“Legends of the 36 Unknown” is a display of 36 photographs suggesting faces and figures in rocks, railroad ties and crumbling bricks.

Entrance to the Mercantile Library at the University of Missouri-St. Louis
Provided by the library

If your job were to nourish and to advance a venerable cultural institution so skillfully that its dignity and integrity would be burnished while, at the same time, you send it riding high into the cultural and civic mainstream by selling it to an over-stimulated, word and image weary public, what would you do, what should you do?

Fabiano Caruana
Provided by the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

The 2016 Candidates Tournament in Moscow has come to a close. This event determined the challenger for the World Chess Championship against Grandmaster Magnus Carlsen — a match to be held in New York this November.

Eight hopeful players, the crème de la crème in the chess world, qualified to participate in this pinnacle of their chess careers by various methods. It was a winner-takes-all event; finishing second was virtually the same as finishing last (besides the thousands of dollars in prizes, minuscule amounts compared to the millions the winner will be playing for against Carlsen).

The North America Outgames in St. Louis would have featured several running events, including half and full marathons, as well as softball and swimming.
Courtesy STL Equality Games, LLC

The 3rd North America OutGames, which was to be held in St. Louis around Memorial Day weekend, has been canceled due to low registration numbers and lacking financial support.

Painkiller
Tom Walker | Flickr | http://bit.ly/22McgqC

Raymond Tait, Ph.D., is the vice president for research at Saint Louis University and recently served on a federal committee that was one of five groups to help draft the National Institute of Health’s National Pain Strategy.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, Tait joined host Don Marsh to discuss the new strategy for treating chronic pain to ensure patients get the most appropriate treatment to manage pain and avoid opioid addiction.

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