Arts & Culture

Chuck Berry
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

This month marks one year since Chuck Berry wrapped up his iconic run at Blueberry Hill in the Delmar Loop. The musician’s performing status is up in the air, according to Blueberry Hill owner Joe Edwards.

“The fact he’s almost 89 years old, who knows? He has the interest in doing it but he’s also working on some songs,” said Edwards. 

John Thavis covered the Vatican for 30 years.
Provided by the author

When veteran Vatican journalist John Thavis interviewed exorcists for his new book, many said right off that exorcism was “nothing at all like the movie.”

These American and Italian priests were referring to the 1973 movie “The Exorcist” made from William Peter Blatty’s novel, which was based on a St. Louis event.

Parking lots disappear in renderings of the new east entrance of Washington University.
Renderings from Washington University

Two of the most important civic, cultural, educational and recreational institutions in the region — Washington University and Forest Park — announced building and renovation plans over the weekend, plans that include transformative changes to come as well as some work already completed.

The plans also include a campaign for bulking up endowment funds for the future for Forest Park. Together, the plans represent a total of about $370 million and include five buildings and a green on the eastern part of the university campus.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for October 4 is  “The Career of Jeff Hamilton.”  Born in Richmond, Indiana, drummer Jeff Hamilton is comfortable playing in all styles of music, equally at home in trio, combo or big band settings.  He went to Indiana University and started his career with Lionel Hampton in 1974.  Jeff first came to prominence with Monty Alexander trio in 1976.  Since then, he has played with a wide variety of artists, including Woody Herman, Oscar Peterson, Ray Brown and the LA Four.  His drumming is very melodic and is characterized by the use of an older style Chinese cymbal.  He teaches,

Commentary: The art form of dance thrives in St. Louis

Oct 2, 2015

The art form of dance is thriving in its many guises throughout our city.

Dance St. Louis, led by Michael Uthoff, presents the best dance companies from around the world at both The Touhill and The Fox.

During Uthoff's ten year tenure, the organization not only focuses on the art form, but has through time, energy, and money been committed to preparing St. Louis's youth interested in dance with comprehensive educational programs.

Director of Sheldon Art Galleries Olivia Lahs-Gonzales joined artist Larry Krone to discuss Krone's exhibit at the Sheldon, "The Best, Best Everything."
Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

Nationally-known multimedia artist Larry Krone grew up in St. Louis, but has not returned for a major exhibition of his work since 2006. On Friday, Oct. 2, that changes when the Sheldon Art Galleries opens an exhibition of his pieces, which combine found textiles, graphics and craft materials with his own artistic stamp.

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

Heather McGinley was born in St. Louis and graduated from O’Fallon Township High School in 2001. Now, she’s returned to the region with the Paul Taylor Dance Company, performing Oct. 2 and 3 at the Touhill Performing Arts Center as the 50th season opener for Dance St. Louis.

“I’ve been dancing professionally in New York for seven years,” said McGinley on Friday’s “Cityscape.” “This will be my first performance in St. Louis since beginning that career.”

The west wing of Soldiers Memorial Museum
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

The person in charge of the Soldiers Memorial Museum is excited about management shifting from the city to the Missouri History Museum. A bill to do just that is now before the St. Louis Board of Aldermen. And   Superintendent Lynnea Magnuson says she's hopeful that the building may now receive the care it deserves.

“This is something that when I started, I would never have dreamed of it happening,” said Magnuson.

A new report finds the rate of homeownership among foreign-born residents in St. Louis is lower than the nation's.
Jim Larrison | Flickr

As St. Louis leaders are looking to turn the city into the fastest-growing metro region for immigrants in the next few years to spur economic growth, a new report shows that a majority of the city's foreign-born residents don't own their own homes. 

Then and Now (Cape Collaboration)
Larry Krone

Nationally-known multi-media artist Larry Krone grew up in St. Louis but has not returned to exhibit his work since 2006. On Friday, Oct. 2, that changes when the Sheldon Art Galleries opens an exhibition of his pieces, which combine found textiles, graphics and craft materials with his own artistic stamp.

Wikimedia Commons

The Guardian has called it “compulsively readable.” Dame Helen Mirren has said it to be a “masterpiece.” On Thursday’s “St. Louis on the Air,” host Don Marsh spoke with prolific theatre critic John Lahr about his biography of St. Louis’ famous playwright, Tennessee Williams, which was released in paperback earlier this month. Turns out, Tennessee Williams was not as fond of claiming St. Louis as St. Louis is of claiming him.

On Chess: World Cup works its way from 128 players to two

Sep 30, 2015
Screen shot from the Baku World Chess Cup
Provided by the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

The World Cup was “demoted” some years ago. It used to be called the World Championship and was the sole way FIDE determined its top title holder. However, since there was a divide between FIDE and what most chess players considered to be the true World Championship cycle, the winners of FIDE's monstrous 128 player knock-out event were never fully recognized as World Champions by many.

Missouri History Museum Photos and Prints Collection.

If you’re a caffeine junkie, you know that St. Louis has a plethora of delicious coffee shops from which to seek your fix. Likewise, with several big coffee roasters such as Kaldi’s and Ronnoco and local icons such as Dana Brown with his famous Safari Coffee commercials, you may even think of St. Louis as a modern-day center for Midwestern coffee nuts. But did you know that St. Louis’ history with coffee reaches back almost 200 years?

Larissa White, Sicily Mathenia and Cameisha Cotton as the Heathers in New Line Theatre's "Heathers"
Jill Ritter Lindberg / Provided by New Line Theatre

When Scott Miller founded St. Louis’ New Line Theatre in 1991, his mission was to present edgy musicals. Problem was, hardly any were available.

“So in the early years, we did some shows that I wrote and we did some re-imagined shows, like ‘Camelot’ with a really small cast, that kind of thing,” Miller said.

Twenty-five years later, it’s a very different story.

Sculpture by George Julian Zolnay was commissioned by Gov. David Francis in memory of his wife, Jane, who died in 1924.
Provided

Bellefontaine Cemetery is magnificent in all seasons. But this vast and celebrated necropolis on West Florissant Avenue in north St. Louis seems most rewarding in autumn. At this season now upon us, nature surrenders some of its vitality: leaves fall; grass turns brown; days go dark earlier. Time and the weather and changing colors poetically find common cause with the cycle of existence.

In collaboration with the cemetery, we are reminded by autumnal transformations that death is an aspect, however heartbreaking, of life; and that since ancient times, the fundamental business of the cemetery is to be maintained as hallowed ground as a city of the dead.

Author David Grossman
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

Internationally recognized author David Grossman returns to St. Louis this week for the first time in 30 years. And 30 years ago, his visit to St. Louis marked a different milestone for the author.

“It was the first time I opened my mouth in English and I realized that I’m able more or less to communicate. Until then I was sure I could only do it in Hebrew,” he said.

Young students learn about design, architecture and working together at the Alberti Program.
Alberti Program blog

With middle age comes maturity and often maturity brings resources, making it possible to look around and discover how one can help out in the community. It’s wonderful when you land on something appropriate, something close to home, and something that just might make a difference in someone’s life. For the Mackey Mitchell Architecture firm, The Alberti Program-Architecture for Young People presented such a possibility.

Mackey Mitchell is almost a half-century old. The Alberti Program is almost 10 years old. Alberti is for children, and it is named for Leon Battista Alberti, the 15th century polymathic Florentine genius whose animated intelligence and aesthetic prowess seemed to know no boundaries.

Kali greets his visitors.
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

Update: This article has been updated to include a State Auditor's approved recoupment of $.0001 for each of the Zoo Museum District institutions.

The Zoo Museum District board is lowering tax rates for the coming year. This will amount to St. Louisans paying a fraction of a cent less per one hundred dollars of taxable property.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, September 27 will be “Keys and Strings Hour + New Music.”  In the “Keys and Strings Hour,” we will hear the compositions of Bud Powell, who, in his heyday, was considered the technical equal to Art Tatum.  Powell was the progenitor of the more open bebop style of piano playing with “shells” of the chords in his left hand.  Jacky Terrasson, Medeski, Martin & Wood, George Shearing, Gonzalo Rubalcaba, Chick Corea, Danilo Pérez, Geri Allen, Keith Jarrett and Bud Powell himself will interpret his works.  In the new music segment of the show, we will hear a Mozart P

Alex Heuer, St. Louis Public Radio

Grand Center advertises itself as the intersection of the arts and life in St. Louis. Home to Powell Hall, the Fox Theatre, the Sheldon, and several other cultural institutions, Grand Center has the ‘arts’ half of that label taken care of. Now, Karin Hagaman, Grand Center, Inc.’s new president and CEO, wants to develop the ‘life’ half.

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