Arts & Culture

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

The Jazz Unlimited show for January 6 will begin a series on listening to musicians who were born or nurtured in specific urban centers.  This is the first of two parts on Detroit and its environs.  On tonight's show the featured musicians include guitarist Kenny Burrell.

The arts community in St. Louis offers a wide variety of performances and venues with music, art, theater, dance, and more.

As we continue our “A Good Year” series, host Steve Potter talked with Vince Schoemehl, President of Grand Center, Inc., and Cynthia Prost, President of the Arts and Education Council of Greater St. Louis, about why it was a “good year” for the arts.

In addition to a wide ranging discussion with guests, we asked our listeners to contribute their highlights. 

Some of that feedback is below.

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Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The voice of a great soul classic has died. Fontella Bass sang the 1965 hit "Rescue Me." She was 72 years old and died from complications caused by a recent heart attack. NPR's Elizabeth Blair has this appreciation.

ELIZABETH BLAIR, BYLINE: It's a perfect song with a perfect voice.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "RESCUE ME")

FONTELLA BASS: (Singing) Rescue me. Take me in your arms. Rescue me. I love your tender charms. I'm rather lonely and I'm blue. I need you and your love, too. Come on and rescue me.

(Courtesy: DA CAPO PRESS)

St. Louis is home to one of the country’s great urban parks.

Forest Park encompasses more than 1,300 acres and in addition to walking, running and bike trails, it includes institutions such as The Muny, Missouri History Museum, Saint Louis Zoo and Saint Louis Science Center.

While he didn’t design Forest Park, landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted did design New York City’s Central Park, Stanford University in California and the Capitol Grounds in Washington, D.C.

John Langholz / Via Flickr

Photo taken at the newly restored St. Louis Public library in downtown St. Louis by John Langholz on Flickr.com.

Join the St. Louis Public Radio Flickr group to see interesting photos taken in the St. Louis region and submit your own. Each week on our website and Facebook page we feature one outstanding photo from the group.

via YouTube video/nyrainbow5

Fontella Bass, a St. Louis-born soul singer who hit the top of the R&B charts with "Rescue Me" in 1965, has died.

The singer's daughter, Neuka Mitchell, says Bass died at a St. Louis hospice Wednesday night of complications from a heart attack suffered three weeks ago. She was 72. Bass had also suffered several strokes since 2005.

(via Flickr/AndrewEick)

The holiday season abounds with well-known Christmas stories and cherished family traditions.

In this St. Louis Public Radio holiday special, we asked our listeners and some members of our staff to share with us their favorite holiday memories, stories and gifts.

We included those stories and well-known stories such as a staff-reading of “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” “Yes Virginia, There is a Santa Claus,” and part of “A Christmas Carol.”

We also featured music by the Ambassadors of Harmony of St. Charles and Bach Society of Saint Louis.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley
Ellwyn Kauffman

The renowned Marchiachi Los Camperos de Nati Cano joins the Compton Heights Concert Band in its 15th Annual Holiday Spectacular on Saturday, December 23 in the Peabody Opera House. 

William Bascomb

Philip Barnes conducts the Saint Louis Chamber Chorus in "Wonder Upon Wonder Will Arrive to Me,"
the third concert of the ensemble's 57th season, on Sunday, December 23.  The a cappella chorus will perform three major works to explore the wonder of the mystery of Christ's birth including Spanish Renaissance composer Tomas Luis de Victoria's "Missa O Magnum Mysterium," a series of motets for the Nativity and the Epiphany by French composer Francis Poulenc and another setting of "O Magnum Mysterium" by Sir Maxwell Davies. 

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